Making Games Is Fun is creating Unique Videogame Photodocumentaries
10

patrons

$55
per Episode
Making games is fun.

It's pure, unadulterated, joyous fun. Apart from when it's stressful, or exhausting, or terrifying, of course. That said, it's also exciting and rewarding, except for when it's lonely, or really, really difficult, or infuriating.

Who Is This Man Talking To Me?



I'm Gareth, (or GaryDooton to many - don't ask). I'm a full time, self employed, freelance portrait photographer. I've been a long time contributor to GamesTM Magazine as well as other publications and I really flipping love taking photos. You can see some of them here

I also take photographs and write for the excellent, delightful videogames website Midnight Resistance. You may also have heard my incomprehensible mess of a voice being pumped into your ears via the videogame-leaning general chatter podcast Chat Very Good.

Finally, I am the creator of Making Games Is Fun, an ongoing series of documentaries about videogame developers. Series one was a 14 month long photo documentary of Hello Games and the people who work there, prior to their announcement of No Man's Sky. It was created in conjunction with David Woollard, an extraordinary web developer without whose input this would not have been even remotely possible. Without David, it would be like writing words and printing photos without any paper to put them on, which would be very stupid indeed. He is the gallery and I am hanging my art stuff inside him.

This was just the beginning. We are now into Series Two of MGIF, where each chapter is an in-depth, intimate look at people working within the games industry.


Why Are You Doing This?



I am creating something different to most current games writing and reportage: I am a portrait photographer, so what I'm doing here is creating portraits of and documenting people who all happen to be involved with the games industry. I'm giving the idea of a portrait a broader perspective, however, by combining writing, an interview podcast AND photography to create something unique and refreshing. By focusing on the people behind the games, I'm looking at the games industry from an angle that is rarely considered.

I do this by separating the creators from their games. By combining photography, writing and podcasting, I can create a comprehensive portrait of a person beyond a single photograph.

Why Patreon?



My plan is to make series two of Making Games Is Fun an ongoing story, where each chapter looks at a different developer, be it a single, bedroom coder, a tiny team of hopefuls, or an individual person in a large company. I have a broad selection of volunteers on the list already, all of whom have agreed to be involved, including some very prominent people and companies (ALL TOP SECRET RIGHT NOW). 

Using Patreon to fund this means that I am not beholden to an editor and I can be totally and independently in control of what, who and how. The people involved are not on their guard because I'm not press, I'm just me. That way, you get to find out about the person and not the media trained face of a company.

What Will My Patreon Cash Pay For?

I believe that Patreon should be about total transparency, so let me break down for you my working week as a freelancer:

-----

As a house husband and dad, I have three days a week to work - Tuesday to Thursday. This is when I either work on processing images from home or I carry out paid commissions that I've previously booked in. My working days last from however long it takes to get my daughter into nursery and get back home until 5pm

Weekends are a wildcard, and I tend to attempt to sneak off and fit some stuff in as and when possible. In fact, it's Sunday right now as I escape upstairs to edit and tweak this Patreon text! I also sometimes get a chance to sneak some work in after 9pm.

-----

By taking on such a huge body of ongoing work, it has to come second to seeking out other paid work; each chapter in series two takes around 50 to 60 hours.

This means the ongoing support would be for the following:

* Exciting bills / reducing the need for other commissions

* Travel and expenses to allow me to visit people and studios, especially to places outside of London

* Service charges for the upkeep and tech support of the website where the content is hosted, as well as possible further web development (basically, paying David for his hard work and expertise)

This means that you, as a patron, are helping me to create a huge, sprawling, ongoing documentary series that simply cannot happen through any current videogames site or publication.

What Will A Chapter From Series Two Look Like?

Each chapter in series two will look at a different studio or individual and will consist of:

* Photodocumentary and portrait photography
* Portraits
* Writing about the individual or studio
* A podcast interview
* Other embedded bits of video or relevant media

Please take the time to see what I've created so far, and judge for yourself whether you enjoy them enough to support me.

FINALLY, And Most Importantly

No matter what level of support I receive, or if everyone runs away and feels like it's not worth supporting me anymore, I will still create these documentaries. More support means I can make more chapters more quickly with greater ease, because it means I don't have to spread that 50 to 60 hour time commitment over a longer period of time.

If you can't spare your money, don't feel beholden to giving it to some idiot on the Internet. I will completely understand if, at any point, you need to alter or withdraw your support. If you swap monetary support for just tweeting and talking about it, that's just as valuable to me.

You don't owe me anything, I'm just using a system available to me to attempt to increase the volume and frequency of my artistic output. If funds dry up, the chapters will become fewer and less frequent, but I won't stop making them, no matter what, so they'll always be here for you to enjoy.

Thanks for showing an interest in what I'm doing, I really, truly appreciate it.
Making games is fun.

It's pure, unadulterated, joyous fun. Apart from when it's stressful, or exhausting, or terrifying, of course. That said, it's also exciting and rewarding, except for when it's lonely, or really, really difficult, or infuriating.

Who Is This Man Talking To Me?



I'm Gareth, (or GaryDooton to many - don't ask). I'm a full time, self employed, freelance portrait photographer. I've been a long time contributor to GamesTM Magazine as well as other publications and I really flipping love taking photos. You can see some of them here

I also take photographs and write for the excellent, delightful videogames website Midnight Resistance. You may also have heard my incomprehensible mess of a voice being pumped into your ears via the videogame-leaning general chatter podcast Chat Very Good.

Finally, I am the creator of Making Games Is Fun, an ongoing series of documentaries about videogame developers. Series one was a 14 month long photo documentary of Hello Games and the people who work there, prior to their announcement of No Man's Sky. It was created in conjunction with David Woollard, an extraordinary web developer without whose input this would not have been even remotely possible. Without David, it would be like writing words and printing photos without any paper to put them on, which would be very stupid indeed. He is the gallery and I am hanging my art stuff inside him.

This was just the beginning. We are now into Series Two of MGIF, where each chapter is an in-depth, intimate look at people working within the games industry.


Why Are You Doing This?



I am creating something different to most current games writing and reportage: I am a portrait photographer, so what I'm doing here is creating portraits of and documenting people who all happen to be involved with the games industry. I'm giving the idea of a portrait a broader perspective, however, by combining writing, an interview podcast AND photography to create something unique and refreshing. By focusing on the people behind the games, I'm looking at the games industry from an angle that is rarely considered.

I do this by separating the creators from their games. By combining photography, writing and podcasting, I can create a comprehensive portrait of a person beyond a single photograph.

Why Patreon?



My plan is to make series two of Making Games Is Fun an ongoing story, where each chapter looks at a different developer, be it a single, bedroom coder, a tiny team of hopefuls, or an individual person in a large company. I have a broad selection of volunteers on the list already, all of whom have agreed to be involved, including some very prominent people and companies (ALL TOP SECRET RIGHT NOW). 

Using Patreon to fund this means that I am not beholden to an editor and I can be totally and independently in control of what, who and how. The people involved are not on their guard because I'm not press, I'm just me. That way, you get to find out about the person and not the media trained face of a company.

What Will My Patreon Cash Pay For?

I believe that Patreon should be about total transparency, so let me break down for you my working week as a freelancer:

-----

As a house husband and dad, I have three days a week to work - Tuesday to Thursday. This is when I either work on processing images from home or I carry out paid commissions that I've previously booked in. My working days last from however long it takes to get my daughter into nursery and get back home until 5pm

Weekends are a wildcard, and I tend to attempt to sneak off and fit some stuff in as and when possible. In fact, it's Sunday right now as I escape upstairs to edit and tweak this Patreon text! I also sometimes get a chance to sneak some work in after 9pm.

-----

By taking on such a huge body of ongoing work, it has to come second to seeking out other paid work; each chapter in series two takes around 50 to 60 hours.

This means the ongoing support would be for the following:

* Exciting bills / reducing the need for other commissions

* Travel and expenses to allow me to visit people and studios, especially to places outside of London

* Service charges for the upkeep and tech support of the website where the content is hosted, as well as possible further web development (basically, paying David for his hard work and expertise)

This means that you, as a patron, are helping me to create a huge, sprawling, ongoing documentary series that simply cannot happen through any current videogames site or publication.

What Will A Chapter From Series Two Look Like?

Each chapter in series two will look at a different studio or individual and will consist of:

* Photodocumentary and portrait photography
* Portraits
* Writing about the individual or studio
* A podcast interview
* Other embedded bits of video or relevant media

Please take the time to see what I've created so far, and judge for yourself whether you enjoy them enough to support me.

FINALLY, And Most Importantly

No matter what level of support I receive, or if everyone runs away and feels like it's not worth supporting me anymore, I will still create these documentaries. More support means I can make more chapters more quickly with greater ease, because it means I don't have to spread that 50 to 60 hour time commitment over a longer period of time.

If you can't spare your money, don't feel beholden to giving it to some idiot on the Internet. I will completely understand if, at any point, you need to alter or withdraw your support. If you swap monetary support for just tweeting and talking about it, that's just as valuable to me.

You don't owe me anything, I'm just using a system available to me to attempt to increase the volume and frequency of my artistic output. If funds dry up, the chapters will become fewer and less frequent, but I won't stop making them, no matter what, so they'll always be here for you to enjoy.

Thanks for showing an interest in what I'm doing, I really, truly appreciate it.

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