Meander Photography is creating Nature Photography/Conservation
0
patrons
Many people take attractive photographs of the natural world, but it's rarer to find someone who is both an artist and a scientist, and able to contribute to both worlds.

I specialize in surveying special places, taking beautiful photographs, and sharing them with the world. But I do more than that. My photographs are not just pretty pictures. Their subjects matter - I communicate why they are important and why the subject is special, rare, or threatened. And most importantly, I write about what I discover, I report it, and I work passionately with local stakeholders, governments, and industry towards the permanent protection of spaces I visit. Everything you see on my page is a photograph of something special, something fragile, a species that needs our assistance. The vast majority of them I find in places that are not yet protected, and they will not be around for our children to enjoy without our help.

I would like to thank anyone who contributes in advance for their patronage. Unlike other photographers, I can thank you more meaningfully - not just with prints of my photographs but with an explanation of why they matter, and why your contribution has made a meaningful change in the world. 
Tiers
Sedge
$2 or more per month
$2 a month makes a meaningful contribution to exploration efforts for rare plants and photography in special places.
Rhododendron
$5 or more per month
$5 a month helps me to plan in advance the level of intensity of field trips and survey effort I'm able to afford to do during each year, and it makes a genuine difference.
Chipmunk
$10 or more per month
$10 a month helps cover the cost of vehicle rentals to survey remote parts of Alberta's public lands for threatened species. 


All patrons at this level will receive a personalized post card at the end of each season thanking them for their support of nature conservation, depicting one of the rarities I've located with their support. 

Whitebark
$20 or more per month
$20 a month makes a significant impact in terms of helping with the exploration and documentation of special spaces that are threatened, but it also begins to help with the 'after season' work, the writing up of survey results and submission of papers to government and industry to push toward the protection of some of the more precious wild spaces in Alberta. This tier is named in recognition of the iconic Whitebark and Limber Pines, which are some of the oldest lived species in Alberta and severely threatened.


Every patron at this level will have a seedling of an endangered five needle pine planted in their name, helping to restore an iconic species. 

Pika
$40 or more per month
$40 a month makes a massive impact, and helps me (and you) make a genuine conservation impact. It helps me to do much more than simple field surveys, but to repeat them, and to focus my efforts on entire study regions that are hotspots of biodiversity, irreplaceable, or uniquely undisturbed. It helps me bring back beautiful photographs and records of unique species, perhaps that have never been reported before (as was the case in 2015, when I found the only nest of an Arctic Yellowjacket species ever reported from Western Canada - to be published). It also helps me to write scientific documents documenting these findings and melding them into persuasive arguments for real, lasting protection of the areas and creatures depicted. I want more than pretty photographs of these areas, and if you're supporting me you likely do too - you want to contribute towards trying to keep them around for future generations. I will contribute all my available energy and time toward this. 


Every patron at this level who has been a patron for a full year (contiguous or not) will receive a personal acknowledgement in any papers submitted to the regulators for their contribution, as well as a hand signed, framed and limited run 8x10 print of a photo of their choice from my portfolio at the end of each season. They will also receive maps of all the survey area covered during the season and a selection of natural history snippets on some of the most major finds made. 


Many people take attractive photographs of the natural world, but it's rarer to find someone who is both an artist and a scientist, and able to contribute to both worlds.

I specialize in surveying special places, taking beautiful photographs, and sharing them with the world. But I do more than that. My photographs are not just pretty pictures. Their subjects matter - I communicate why they are important and why the subject is special, rare, or threatened. And most importantly, I write about what I discover, I report it, and I work passionately with local stakeholders, governments, and industry towards the permanent protection of spaces I visit. Everything you see on my page is a photograph of something special, something fragile, a species that needs our assistance. The vast majority of them I find in places that are not yet protected, and they will not be around for our children to enjoy without our help.

I would like to thank anyone who contributes in advance for their patronage. Unlike other photographers, I can thank you more meaningfully - not just with prints of my photographs but with an explanation of why they matter, and why your contribution has made a meaningful change in the world. 

Recent posts by Meander Photography

Tiers
Sedge
$2 or more per month
$2 a month makes a meaningful contribution to exploration efforts for rare plants and photography in special places.
Rhododendron
$5 or more per month
$5 a month helps me to plan in advance the level of intensity of field trips and survey effort I'm able to afford to do during each year, and it makes a genuine difference.
Chipmunk
$10 or more per month
$10 a month helps cover the cost of vehicle rentals to survey remote parts of Alberta's public lands for threatened species. 


All patrons at this level will receive a personalized post card at the end of each season thanking them for their support of nature conservation, depicting one of the rarities I've located with their support. 

Whitebark
$20 or more per month
$20 a month makes a significant impact in terms of helping with the exploration and documentation of special spaces that are threatened, but it also begins to help with the 'after season' work, the writing up of survey results and submission of papers to government and industry to push toward the protection of some of the more precious wild spaces in Alberta. This tier is named in recognition of the iconic Whitebark and Limber Pines, which are some of the oldest lived species in Alberta and severely threatened.


Every patron at this level will have a seedling of an endangered five needle pine planted in their name, helping to restore an iconic species. 

Pika
$40 or more per month
$40 a month makes a massive impact, and helps me (and you) make a genuine conservation impact. It helps me to do much more than simple field surveys, but to repeat them, and to focus my efforts on entire study regions that are hotspots of biodiversity, irreplaceable, or uniquely undisturbed. It helps me bring back beautiful photographs and records of unique species, perhaps that have never been reported before (as was the case in 2015, when I found the only nest of an Arctic Yellowjacket species ever reported from Western Canada - to be published). It also helps me to write scientific documents documenting these findings and melding them into persuasive arguments for real, lasting protection of the areas and creatures depicted. I want more than pretty photographs of these areas, and if you're supporting me you likely do too - you want to contribute towards trying to keep them around for future generations. I will contribute all my available energy and time toward this. 


Every patron at this level who has been a patron for a full year (contiguous or not) will receive a personal acknowledgement in any papers submitted to the regulators for their contribution, as well as a hand signed, framed and limited run 8x10 print of a photo of their choice from my portfolio at the end of each season. They will also receive maps of all the survey area covered during the season and a selection of natural history snippets on some of the most major finds made.