Tomas Hood (NW7US) is creating the NW7US Worldwide Radio Communications YouTube Channel
4

patrons

$17
per month
Welcome.

The NW7US Worldwide Radio Communications YouTube Channel is your source for detailed usable information about radio communications, especially shortwave radio technologies, techniques, nuances, News, and more.

This Patreon connection is here to enable you and I to interact  in a more direct and practical, supportive way. I appreciate your real support, as well as your suggestions and feedback. 

I am the space weather and radio propagation editor for CQ Amateur Radio Magazine, The Spectrum Monitor magazine, and RadioUser (in the UK). Before they went extinct, I also wrote monthly or regular columns in Popular Communications, The Monitoring Times, and CQ VHF. I study the Sun-Earth connection and how it influences radio communications, especially shortwave radio propagation.

I create videos and other media regarding space weather, radio propagation, and related topics. The NW7US Worldwide Radio Communications YouTube Channel is one primary effort by which I give back to the radio community. I'm thankful for the incredible support I've had throughout my life, from many in the radio hobby community, and beyond.  I appreciate YOU.

I continually need your financial support, the funds used for updating my video gear and software, for the monthly fees I have for such things as the Adobe software, and the website servers with the bandwidth I must fund. Most of this funding has and still comes from my own salary I get from my day job (I program). It is a relief when supporters like you help me offset these expenses. Thank you! 

MORE ABOUT ME

I am an amateur (ham) radio communicator, a shortwave radio listener (known as an SWLer, a person into shortwave radio listening, or SWLing for short.). My FCC-assigned call sign is NW7US - - hence the use of my call sign in the channel's title. 

When I am on the high frequencies (or, HF, another way of reference to the shortwave radio spectrum, which is from 3 MHz to 30 MHz), I often transmit and receive digital radio modes such as JT65A, JT9, and Olivia.  These are digital communications modes that enable radio hobbyists to transmit using very low power on shortwave radio (an operation known as QRP, or Low-Power Radio Telecommunications).

I also enjoy communicating on the radio using International Morse Code, modulating a radio transmitter continuous wave with my antique straight key that turns on and off the radio in the long and short key-downs that make up the Morse code language.  This mode of Morse-code signaling is known as CW.

Sometimes, I use voice communications on the HF amateur radio allocations, and on some VHF and UHF allocations. The acronym VHF stands for Very High Frequency, while UHF stands for Ultra-high Frequency. 

Most of my life, I have been involved in computer sciences and telecommunications. Software engineering, hardware and networking, and systems engineering have all been part of my job at one time or another. I've been a radio DJ, an emergency communications director, dispatcher, US Army communications Signal Corps member, and have filled a variety of other capacities in communications.

I first discovered shortwave radio communications during the early years of the 1970s. Within the first year of exploring the unique signals on the high frequencies, I discovered the WWV time station out of Boulder, Colorado.  That station transmitted the time, every second of every hour of every day.  One feature of WWV is an hourly solar and terrestrial bulletin. Hearing those bulletins that reported how many sunspots were visible on the Sun, and other information, triggered my life-long passion for space weather and radio propagation.

I became a Signal Corps soldier in 1985.  During my US Army service I received several Army Achievement Medals for exceptional performance in my unit's communications mission. Part of my effort was
establishing a standard operating procedure (SOP) manual.  Using this, I helped train fellow soldiers on proper and effective communications process and skill. I also actively participated with the engineering of successful trans-European communications circuits during my tour of duty in Germany.

After my service in the US Army, I was ready to get an amateur radio license. My Novice ticket arrived early in 1990, so I began daily sessions filled with Morse code conversations on shortwave (a two-way radio communications session is also known as a QSO) that resulted in my first DX contact. The term DX typically refers to a QSO between people located in different countries. Since then, I've progressed to the Amateur Extra ham radio license (having taken the Morse-code element of my test session, years ago).

I've been involved in AM and FM radio broadcasting, emergency communications, professionally as a 911 dispatcher, and as a volunteer in various capacities including being the Washington State Army MARS Director.

I authored and administer the first, longest-running space weather and radio propagation website, and one of the most popular Facebook space weather and radio propagation page (See the Space Weather and Radio Propagation Facebook Page). 

I am also professionally involved in software programming, computer systems engineering, and related activities.

Recently, I became a recipient of the YASME Excellence Award for my "sustained education of the amateur community regarding propagation, solar and geomagnetic physics." 

Since 2001, I monthly write about radio propagation and space weather in various magazines (such as CQ Amateur Radio Magazine and The Spectrum Monitor). I have been published as a contributor to an ARRL publication on QRP communication.

This year, I started as a contributing editor in the RadioUser (UK) Magazine.  I write a monthly column in which I explore space weather, geophysical science, and radio propagation. The column covers news and science in a balanced approach without getting academic. The column enables readers to gain a working knowledge in a way that encourages effective radio communications.

My long background in space weather exploration and radio communications provides a foundation on which I create each edition of the column.

AGAIN, THANK YOU FOR YOUR FINANCIAL SUPPORT!  IT IS APPRECIATED.

73 (best regards),
Tomas Hood, NW7US
Tiers
Monthly Support
$1 or more per month 1 patron
 Please be a patron because...
  • You like what I'm doing.
  • You want me to make more.
  • Thank you for your support!
Monthly Support at Five Bucks...
$5 or more per month 3 patrons
If you become a $5.00 per month patron and stay a patron for at least 12 months (one year), you will get a special T-Shirt with cool artwork (the Sun and space weather graphics). Be sure to indicate your shipping information.
 

Please be a patron because...

  • You like what I'm doing.
  • You want me to make more.
  • Thank you for your support!
Premium Patron Monthly support
$25 or more per month 0 patrons
At this level of support, you get a t-shirt featuring great graphics. This is the premium support level, deeply appreciated. 
The Executive Patron Monthly Support
$50 or more per month 0 patrons
At this level of support, you get a t-shirt featuring great graphics. This is the premium support level, deeply appreciated. You will also be listed on tbe chsnnel page, and in videos. 
Goals
$17 of $100 per month
When my YouTube channel reaches $100 per month, I’ll launch a special video series, "The Three-Minute Ham Radio Elmer."

This is a three-minute-per-episode teachable moment covering ham radio knowledge, from how to work a pile-up to mini radio expeditions.

Thank you for making this possible.  Your suggestions about topics to cover in episodes are welcome!
1 of 2
Welcome.

The NW7US Worldwide Radio Communications YouTube Channel is your source for detailed usable information about radio communications, especially shortwave radio technologies, techniques, nuances, News, and more.

This Patreon connection is here to enable you and I to interact  in a more direct and practical, supportive way. I appreciate your real support, as well as your suggestions and feedback. 

I am the space weather and radio propagation editor for CQ Amateur Radio Magazine, The Spectrum Monitor magazine, and RadioUser (in the UK). Before they went extinct, I also wrote monthly or regular columns in Popular Communications, The Monitoring Times, and CQ VHF. I study the Sun-Earth connection and how it influences radio communications, especially shortwave radio propagation.

I create videos and other media regarding space weather, radio propagation, and related topics. The NW7US Worldwide Radio Communications YouTube Channel is one primary effort by which I give back to the radio community. I'm thankful for the incredible support I've had throughout my life, from many in the radio hobby community, and beyond.  I appreciate YOU.

I continually need your financial support, the funds used for updating my video gear and software, for the monthly fees I have for such things as the Adobe software, and the website servers with the bandwidth I must fund. Most of this funding has and still comes from my own salary I get from my day job (I program). It is a relief when supporters like you help me offset these expenses. Thank you! 

MORE ABOUT ME

I am an amateur (ham) radio communicator, a shortwave radio listener (known as an SWLer, a person into shortwave radio listening, or SWLing for short.). My FCC-assigned call sign is NW7US - - hence the use of my call sign in the channel's title. 

When I am on the high frequencies (or, HF, another way of reference to the shortwave radio spectrum, which is from 3 MHz to 30 MHz), I often transmit and receive digital radio modes such as JT65A, JT9, and Olivia.  These are digital communications modes that enable radio hobbyists to transmit using very low power on shortwave radio (an operation known as QRP, or Low-Power Radio Telecommunications).

I also enjoy communicating on the radio using International Morse Code, modulating a radio transmitter continuous wave with my antique straight key that turns on and off the radio in the long and short key-downs that make up the Morse code language.  This mode of Morse-code signaling is known as CW.

Sometimes, I use voice communications on the HF amateur radio allocations, and on some VHF and UHF allocations. The acronym VHF stands for Very High Frequency, while UHF stands for Ultra-high Frequency. 

Most of my life, I have been involved in computer sciences and telecommunications. Software engineering, hardware and networking, and systems engineering have all been part of my job at one time or another. I've been a radio DJ, an emergency communications director, dispatcher, US Army communications Signal Corps member, and have filled a variety of other capacities in communications.

I first discovered shortwave radio communications during the early years of the 1970s. Within the first year of exploring the unique signals on the high frequencies, I discovered the WWV time station out of Boulder, Colorado.  That station transmitted the time, every second of every hour of every day.  One feature of WWV is an hourly solar and terrestrial bulletin. Hearing those bulletins that reported how many sunspots were visible on the Sun, and other information, triggered my life-long passion for space weather and radio propagation.

I became a Signal Corps soldier in 1985.  During my US Army service I received several Army Achievement Medals for exceptional performance in my unit's communications mission. Part of my effort was
establishing a standard operating procedure (SOP) manual.  Using this, I helped train fellow soldiers on proper and effective communications process and skill. I also actively participated with the engineering of successful trans-European communications circuits during my tour of duty in Germany.

After my service in the US Army, I was ready to get an amateur radio license. My Novice ticket arrived early in 1990, so I began daily sessions filled with Morse code conversations on shortwave (a two-way radio communications session is also known as a QSO) that resulted in my first DX contact. The term DX typically refers to a QSO between people located in different countries. Since then, I've progressed to the Amateur Extra ham radio license (having taken the Morse-code element of my test session, years ago).

I've been involved in AM and FM radio broadcasting, emergency communications, professionally as a 911 dispatcher, and as a volunteer in various capacities including being the Washington State Army MARS Director.

I authored and administer the first, longest-running space weather and radio propagation website, and one of the most popular Facebook space weather and radio propagation page (See the Space Weather and Radio Propagation Facebook Page). 

I am also professionally involved in software programming, computer systems engineering, and related activities.

Recently, I became a recipient of the YASME Excellence Award for my "sustained education of the amateur community regarding propagation, solar and geomagnetic physics." 

Since 2001, I monthly write about radio propagation and space weather in various magazines (such as CQ Amateur Radio Magazine and The Spectrum Monitor). I have been published as a contributor to an ARRL publication on QRP communication.

This year, I started as a contributing editor in the RadioUser (UK) Magazine.  I write a monthly column in which I explore space weather, geophysical science, and radio propagation. The column covers news and science in a balanced approach without getting academic. The column enables readers to gain a working knowledge in a way that encourages effective radio communications.

My long background in space weather exploration and radio communications provides a foundation on which I create each edition of the column.

AGAIN, THANK YOU FOR YOUR FINANCIAL SUPPORT!  IT IS APPRECIATED.

73 (best regards),
Tomas Hood, NW7US

Recent posts by Tomas Hood (NW7US)

Tiers
Monthly Support
$1 or more per month 1 patron
 Please be a patron because...
  • You like what I'm doing.
  • You want me to make more.
  • Thank you for your support!
Monthly Support at Five Bucks...
$5 or more per month 3 patrons
If you become a $5.00 per month patron and stay a patron for at least 12 months (one year), you will get a special T-Shirt with cool artwork (the Sun and space weather graphics). Be sure to indicate your shipping information.
 

Please be a patron because...

  • You like what I'm doing.
  • You want me to make more.
  • Thank you for your support!
Premium Patron Monthly support
$25 or more per month 0 patrons
At this level of support, you get a t-shirt featuring great graphics. This is the premium support level, deeply appreciated. 
The Executive Patron Monthly Support
$50 or more per month 0 patrons
At this level of support, you get a t-shirt featuring great graphics. This is the premium support level, deeply appreciated. You will also be listed on tbe chsnnel page, and in videos.