Ian Street is creating The Quiet Branches
0

patrons

$0
per month
Hello! I'm Ian and welcome to The Quiet Branches, a blog dedicated to telling the under-appreciated stories of science.
 
Thank you for becoming a part of a science writing enthusiast community  (+ sometimes video, stay tuned)! I have a PhD in plant sciences and am fresh out of academia— a postdoc— and building my career as a science writer and editor (hence Patreon and where you come in). 

What does becoming a patron here mean? 
  1. I publish, on average, two posts per month, sometimes more. My Patrons will contribute on a per month basis.
  2. I am new at this and the rewards for patrons will likely evolve. One for top patrons will be name recognition on the blog, thanking you for supporting a closer look at the natural world. Another early reward will be behind the scenes exclusives, like projects in progress, taking your ideas and turning them into posts, and me sharing things I find interesting. But these will evolve over time. 
  3. What I'll be doing with patron contributions: Goal one is to pay for the domain and Wordpress account for the next year and some of the software tools I use to generate images and video for the blog. Beyond that, you're funding my budding science writing career, something I've been working towards for awhile. The more patrons I have and the more I thrive, the better and the more ambitious I can be in the stories I tell/write/create. And all of that will feed back to you, patrons and readers of The Quiet Branches.

The Quiet Branches is my blog dedicated to telling the stories of science. Specifically the stories of science that go under-appreciated in the world. It's a blog I started two years ago where I largely write about plants and plant science. However, now that I'm no longer an academic, I'm expanding its mission to write stories of science that likely won't make news, but are none-the-less important to tell or just plain interesting. It's science, history, connections to culture and society, and maybe a deeper dive into some stories that are in the news. 

Why does this matter? Plants are the medium we exist in and are 100% reliant upon, sometimes in surprising ways. They are also fascinating in and of themselves. It's worth understanding them and how they work. And that is not just true of plants, it's true of other areas of science as well. CRISPR was first an odd observation made about DNA in bacteria and it will now revolutionize biology. These quieter (at first) stories are the ones I will focus on telling.

Science doesn't fit as well with the modern news cycle (progress is incremental and there is a large history and context to be reminded of each time a new study is published. Further, new studies need time to be confirmed and tested. On The Quiet Branches, the slow churn of scientists at work will be brought into relief. It is ideal for students or for teachers wanting more specific stories about science than standard text books provide, but is good for anyone, I hope.

Thank you again for being a part of my communicating science! 

+Ian 

Image: A cyanotype by Anna Atkins, an early pioneer of photography. This is part of the New York Public Library's Digital Collections. Here is my post about her
Rewards
Thank you! See draft blog posts and I'll share stuff I find interesting and interact with patrons
$2 or more per month 0 patrons
  • I'll post drafts of some posts before publication for patrons to see the process of going from idea to final product.
  • I'll share stuff I find interesting, short anecdotes and point to other science writers I love. 
  • My heartfelt thanks.
Shout out in Patron Page on The Quiet Branches.
$10 or more per month 0 patrons
  • Your name will be listed on a patron page on the blog.
  • Each post you support will list your name at the end as a supporter of that content as long as you are a patron.
  • At the end of the year, I'll ask for contact info and send a personal note to you.
  • Plus all previous awards
Goals
$0 of $150 per month
This will allow me to afford some of the tools I use to create content for The Quiet Branches (besides the word processor), internet server fees, and a few other background things. If I reach this goal, I'll re-take up a hobby of mine and share (mostly bad) botanical art I draw with a pencil on a post-it, exclusively for patrons.
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Hello! I'm Ian and welcome to The Quiet Branches, a blog dedicated to telling the under-appreciated stories of science.
 
Thank you for becoming a part of a science writing enthusiast community  (+ sometimes video, stay tuned)! I have a PhD in plant sciences and am fresh out of academia— a postdoc— and building my career as a science writer and editor (hence Patreon and where you come in). 

What does becoming a patron here mean? 
  1. I publish, on average, two posts per month, sometimes more. My Patrons will contribute on a per month basis.
  2. I am new at this and the rewards for patrons will likely evolve. One for top patrons will be name recognition on the blog, thanking you for supporting a closer look at the natural world. Another early reward will be behind the scenes exclusives, like projects in progress, taking your ideas and turning them into posts, and me sharing things I find interesting. But these will evolve over time. 
  3. What I'll be doing with patron contributions: Goal one is to pay for the domain and Wordpress account for the next year and some of the software tools I use to generate images and video for the blog. Beyond that, you're funding my budding science writing career, something I've been working towards for awhile. The more patrons I have and the more I thrive, the better and the more ambitious I can be in the stories I tell/write/create. And all of that will feed back to you, patrons and readers of The Quiet Branches.

The Quiet Branches is my blog dedicated to telling the stories of science. Specifically the stories of science that go under-appreciated in the world. It's a blog I started two years ago where I largely write about plants and plant science. However, now that I'm no longer an academic, I'm expanding its mission to write stories of science that likely won't make news, but are none-the-less important to tell or just plain interesting. It's science, history, connections to culture and society, and maybe a deeper dive into some stories that are in the news. 

Why does this matter? Plants are the medium we exist in and are 100% reliant upon, sometimes in surprising ways. They are also fascinating in and of themselves. It's worth understanding them and how they work. And that is not just true of plants, it's true of other areas of science as well. CRISPR was first an odd observation made about DNA in bacteria and it will now revolutionize biology. These quieter (at first) stories are the ones I will focus on telling.

Science doesn't fit as well with the modern news cycle (progress is incremental and there is a large history and context to be reminded of each time a new study is published. Further, new studies need time to be confirmed and tested. On The Quiet Branches, the slow churn of scientists at work will be brought into relief. It is ideal for students or for teachers wanting more specific stories about science than standard text books provide, but is good for anyone, I hope.

Thank you again for being a part of my communicating science! 

+Ian 

Image: A cyanotype by Anna Atkins, an early pioneer of photography. This is part of the New York Public Library's Digital Collections. Here is my post about her

Recent posts by Ian Street

Rewards
Thank you! See draft blog posts and I'll share stuff I find interesting and interact with patrons
$2 or more per month 0 patrons
  • I'll post drafts of some posts before publication for patrons to see the process of going from idea to final product.
  • I'll share stuff I find interesting, short anecdotes and point to other science writers I love. 
  • My heartfelt thanks.
Shout out in Patron Page on The Quiet Branches.
$10 or more per month 0 patrons
  • Your name will be listed on a patron page on the blog.
  • Each post you support will list your name at the end as a supporter of that content as long as you are a patron.
  • At the end of the year, I'll ask for contact info and send a personal note to you.
  • Plus all previous awards