Sandra M. Lopes is creating Essays on transgender issues, videos about smoking fetishism
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Around 15 years ago or so, I started writing about crossdressing and transgender issues. At that time, there was not that much to read about those subjects, and what little you found was mostly about makeup tips and clothing for MtF crossdressers. But there is so much more to transgenderity than the right choice of lipstick colour! So I started to write about the subject (while also mentioning makeup...).
We currently have mostly activists, academics from the social sciences, and some doctors writing on transgender issues. Each, of course, has their own agenda, and their particular point of view on the subject. I write from the point of view of the community — or at least from someone who is part of the community and struggles every day about her gender identity, even though my answers might not be the same that others have found for themselves.
There is more to transgender studies than political activism, social sciences, or medical sciences. I believe we also need to go a step further, and ask about the issue from a philosophic point of view — the meta view, the ontological perspective on transgender issues. It deals with an incredible lot of stuff, much of which is brushed over lightly by so many people.
So, yes, I'm an aspiring transgender philosopher. And, like Diogenes, at the current state of my life, I'm pretty much stuck to living in a barrel with whatever clothes I've still got, and survive thanks to the generous contributions of some of my familiars. It comes to no surprise to many of you who have been struggling with your own gender identity that, at some point, your gender dysphoria has been so overwhelming that it brought a severe clinical depression upon you. In my personal case, it's been four years which the depression has robbed me from the ability to do my work. It's way strange how the mind works, and why exactly I have no problem in continuing to write 15k-word essays on my blog, but cannot write a single line for my work, even though my survival allegedly depends on the ability to continue to work and get paid for it.
Many transgender people who have been affected with severe clinical depression had the luck of having partners or familiars to support them, until medication and therapy had a chance to help them out to go ahead with their lives. Others, not so fortunately, had no choice but to commit suicide. I'm part of the lucky ones: although I live way below the poverty line of my own country, I still manage to get plenty to eat (you can see how fat I am!) and have a roof over my head (which does not leak) and a lot of clothes generously gifted by friends and family. I survive, but barely so; and all because I cannot work to get paid.
So, it hurts me deeply to turn to complete strangers in order to ask them for money in return of what I have given them to read (and to watch!) over the past decade or so. I'm a strong believer that the Internet is supposed to be free, or as free as possible, and as much information ought to be provided for free. But it comes a time when we must ask ourselves: yes, that's all very nice, but who is going to pay for those who create content for free to be able to survive? We need different revenue models in a new society, where people are able to share their knowledge and their thoughts, contribute to the overall information shared for free, but somehow are still able to get something to eat and a place to sleep with some clothes on their body.
I thought, at some point, that ad revenue was the answer. I have more than a million views on my YouTube videos — I thought that would be reasonable enough to get some money out of it; and I run Google AdSense ads on my blog. But as it turns out, for the past 15 years, Google has been slashing their payment for ads more and more, as more and more websites (and YouTube channels) have been created. Nowadays it's incredibly hard to live on ad revenues, unless you are very lucky and by some chance you become viral. But that is really one-in-a-million chance!
So, while I will still keep those pesky ads around, I will nevertheless experiment with Patreon as well.
I'm not a new user of Patreon; I have been here for a while, mostly encouraging artists who write or paint or create comic books where transgender characters are frequent, if not in the main role. My contributions to them are tiny — literally spare change, the kind that allows you to buy a coffee per month and not more. But that's the whole point: get people together, all contributing with a few cents, and that sums up nicely. Some people here on Patreon struggle hard to be able to keep their art alive; Patreon at least has enabled them to have something extra at the end of a tough month, so that at least they can have something to eat. You don't realise how powerful and useful Patreon is for so many people around here.
I'm no artist. My YouTube videos are just a fantasy for the tiny, insignificant smoking fetishist community, and are constantly misunderstood; no wonder, because that community is so far removed from everyday, mainstream tastes that they are not understandable by the average guy. And my essays are not quite an art, and not quite scientific studies; they point out a direction which hopefully some real, bona fide scientists may one day research. Still, I'm also aware that some people enjoy what I write, and are even fond of quoting me. So all I'm asking is to drink one cup of coffee less per month and send the money my way :-) Surely that's not really much to ask for! :-)
Cheers, hugs and kisses to you all!
Tiers
Dāna Master
$50 or more per creation 0 patrons
Dāna is Sanskrit for generosity, and while I cannot send you any expensive gifts in return for your kindness (at least for now), I will at least grant you access to the reserved area of my own website, where you'll become a registered user.
Goals
$0 of $50 per creation
This is very roughly what my whole Internet presence costs every month — this includes server fees, domain name fees, and the like. The amount also includes the costs I have to support a dozen or so other people/organisations who are way too poor to have their own decent Internet presence, so this amount is not just for me! It also includes what I pay to a few charities and the handful of patrons I support on Patreon.
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Around 15 years ago or so, I started writing about crossdressing and transgender issues. At that time, there was not that much to read about those subjects, and what little you found was mostly about makeup tips and clothing for MtF crossdressers. But there is so much more to transgenderity than the right choice of lipstick colour! So I started to write about the subject (while also mentioning makeup...).
We currently have mostly activists, academics from the social sciences, and some doctors writing on transgender issues. Each, of course, has their own agenda, and their particular point of view on the subject. I write from the point of view of the community — or at least from someone who is part of the community and struggles every day about her gender identity, even though my answers might not be the same that others have found for themselves.
There is more to transgender studies than political activism, social sciences, or medical sciences. I believe we also need to go a step further, and ask about the issue from a philosophic point of view — the meta view, the ontological perspective on transgender issues. It deals with an incredible lot of stuff, much of which is brushed over lightly by so many people.
So, yes, I'm an aspiring transgender philosopher. And, like Diogenes, at the current state of my life, I'm pretty much stuck to living in a barrel with whatever clothes I've still got, and survive thanks to the generous contributions of some of my familiars. It comes to no surprise to many of you who have been struggling with your own gender identity that, at some point, your gender dysphoria has been so overwhelming that it brought a severe clinical depression upon you. In my personal case, it's been four years which the depression has robbed me from the ability to do my work. It's way strange how the mind works, and why exactly I have no problem in continuing to write 15k-word essays on my blog, but cannot write a single line for my work, even though my survival allegedly depends on the ability to continue to work and get paid for it.
Many transgender people who have been affected with severe clinical depression had the luck of having partners or familiars to support them, until medication and therapy had a chance to help them out to go ahead with their lives. Others, not so fortunately, had no choice but to commit suicide. I'm part of the lucky ones: although I live way below the poverty line of my own country, I still manage to get plenty to eat (you can see how fat I am!) and have a roof over my head (which does not leak) and a lot of clothes generously gifted by friends and family. I survive, but barely so; and all because I cannot work to get paid.
So, it hurts me deeply to turn to complete strangers in order to ask them for money in return of what I have given them to read (and to watch!) over the past decade or so. I'm a strong believer that the Internet is supposed to be free, or as free as possible, and as much information ought to be provided for free. But it comes a time when we must ask ourselves: yes, that's all very nice, but who is going to pay for those who create content for free to be able to survive? We need different revenue models in a new society, where people are able to share their knowledge and their thoughts, contribute to the overall information shared for free, but somehow are still able to get something to eat and a place to sleep with some clothes on their body.
I thought, at some point, that ad revenue was the answer. I have more than a million views on my YouTube videos — I thought that would be reasonable enough to get some money out of it; and I run Google AdSense ads on my blog. But as it turns out, for the past 15 years, Google has been slashing their payment for ads more and more, as more and more websites (and YouTube channels) have been created. Nowadays it's incredibly hard to live on ad revenues, unless you are very lucky and by some chance you become viral. But that is really one-in-a-million chance!
So, while I will still keep those pesky ads around, I will nevertheless experiment with Patreon as well.
I'm not a new user of Patreon; I have been here for a while, mostly encouraging artists who write or paint or create comic books where transgender characters are frequent, if not in the main role. My contributions to them are tiny — literally spare change, the kind that allows you to buy a coffee per month and not more. But that's the whole point: get people together, all contributing with a few cents, and that sums up nicely. Some people here on Patreon struggle hard to be able to keep their art alive; Patreon at least has enabled them to have something extra at the end of a tough month, so that at least they can have something to eat. You don't realise how powerful and useful Patreon is for so many people around here.
I'm no artist. My YouTube videos are just a fantasy for the tiny, insignificant smoking fetishist community, and are constantly misunderstood; no wonder, because that community is so far removed from everyday, mainstream tastes that they are not understandable by the average guy. And my essays are not quite an art, and not quite scientific studies; they point out a direction which hopefully some real, bona fide scientists may one day research. Still, I'm also aware that some people enjoy what I write, and are even fond of quoting me. So all I'm asking is to drink one cup of coffee less per month and send the money my way :-) Surely that's not really much to ask for! :-)
Cheers, hugs and kisses to you all!

Recent posts by Sandra M. Lopes

Tiers
Dāna Master
$50 or more per creation 0 patrons
Dāna is Sanskrit for generosity, and while I cannot send you any expensive gifts in return for your kindness (at least for now), I will at least grant you access to the reserved area of my own website, where you'll become a registered user.