Wildbow is creating Web Serials
1,250

patrons

$5,105
per month
Hello, and welcome,

I'm 'Wildbow', and I write web serials, putting chapters online every Tuesday and Saturday, and some Thursdays too, if and when funding hits certain benchmarks. I wrote Worm, Pact, and Twig which have all completed.  The fourth work, Ward, sequel to Worm, has begun as of November 2017.

My first series, Worm, was something of a sleeper hit.   Word spread, and is still spreading, about the story, which features a teenager with a superpower that lets her control bugs.  She is mistaken for a supervillain on an early outing, and is thrust into a world where hero and villain and good and evil don't always match up.

In Pact, our protagonist inherits his grandmother's house in a small town and her trove of diabolic tomes, along with all of the enemies and negative attention that come with being a diabolist. Allies are few and far between, and the best weapons at his disposal have consequences for use that could readily surpass whatever his enemies have in store for him.

Twig featured a small group of protagonists, and they're small in more ways than one. In a world where biology is a plaything of scientists and great mysteries and challenges of life are being solved and ticked off one by one, we see a group of eerily competent children taking a hand in events.  The genre is biopunk - it is bent to the science of biology much as the Matrix is bent to the cybernetic, and our characters are investigators and saboteurs.

Ward continues from two years after Worm left off.  We follow one of the side characters from Worm as she finds her way through a fragile climate where public perception of the superheroes and supervillains has changed, and where the 'game' and cape politics have taken on a new dynamic.

Worm kicked off and quickly became a niche hit, topping charts at Webfictionguide, at Muse's Success, while Pact has done well enough, placing fifth overall on Webfictionguide for Webfiction in general. Both soared in the vote rankings on Topwebfiction, earning their share of fanart and a great deal of fanfiction as well, which continues to be produced even after they finished their respective runs.  Twig was more of an experimental project, dwelling on the characters' coming of age and relationships in a dark, science-fantasy setting.  Responses to Twig were largely positive among its readership, though its experimental nature and break from conventional genres may have led to that readership being smaller.

Consistency and professionalism are big priorities for me as an author, and all stories maintain dedicated Tuesday-and-Saturday schedules, with extra chapters released on Thursdays as income comes in from Paypal and Patreon.  Worm and Twig both took roughly two and a half years to conclude (give or take a few months) and were upwards of 1,600,000 words, an excess of twenty novels worth of material each. Pact took one year and two months to write, and was roughly 950,000 words long, covering about half the length and wordcount of the works preceding & following it.

As you might guess, this means I write a lot, more than a book every month in terms of raw wordcount. I put in 50-60 hours a week to make this possible, and I have no plans to stop anytime soon. Recognizing that support from readers makes it possible for me to provide more content, I offer additional chapters, as described above.

Thank you for your time, and thank you for your support.
Hello, and welcome,

I'm 'Wildbow', and I write web serials, putting chapters online every Tuesday and Saturday, and some Thursdays too, if and when funding hits certain benchmarks. I wrote Worm, Pact, and Twig which have all completed.  The fourth work, Ward, sequel to Worm, has begun as of November 2017.

My first series, Worm, was something of a sleeper hit.   Word spread, and is still spreading, about the story, which features a teenager with a superpower that lets her control bugs.  She is mistaken for a supervillain on an early outing, and is thrust into a world where hero and villain and good and evil don't always match up.

In Pact, our protagonist inherits his grandmother's house in a small town and her trove of diabolic tomes, along with all of the enemies and negative attention that come with being a diabolist. Allies are few and far between, and the best weapons at his disposal have consequences for use that could readily surpass whatever his enemies have in store for him.

Twig featured a small group of protagonists, and they're small in more ways than one. In a world where biology is a plaything of scientists and great mysteries and challenges of life are being solved and ticked off one by one, we see a group of eerily competent children taking a hand in events.  The genre is biopunk - it is bent to the science of biology much as the Matrix is bent to the cybernetic, and our characters are investigators and saboteurs.

Ward continues from two years after Worm left off.  We follow one of the side characters from Worm as she finds her way through a fragile climate where public perception of the superheroes and supervillains has changed, and where the 'game' and cape politics have taken on a new dynamic.

Worm kicked off and quickly became a niche hit, topping charts at Webfictionguide, at Muse's Success, while Pact has done well enough, placing fifth overall on Webfictionguide for Webfiction in general. Both soared in the vote rankings on Topwebfiction, earning their share of fanart and a great deal of fanfiction as well, which continues to be produced even after they finished their respective runs.  Twig was more of an experimental project, dwelling on the characters' coming of age and relationships in a dark, science-fantasy setting.  Responses to Twig were largely positive among its readership, though its experimental nature and break from conventional genres may have led to that readership being smaller.

Consistency and professionalism are big priorities for me as an author, and all stories maintain dedicated Tuesday-and-Saturday schedules, with extra chapters released on Thursdays as income comes in from Paypal and Patreon.  Worm and Twig both took roughly two and a half years to conclude (give or take a few months) and were upwards of 1,600,000 words, an excess of twenty novels worth of material each. Pact took one year and two months to write, and was roughly 950,000 words long, covering about half the length and wordcount of the works preceding & following it.

As you might guess, this means I write a lot, more than a book every month in terms of raw wordcount. I put in 50-60 hours a week to make this possible, and I have no plans to stop anytime soon. Recognizing that support from readers makes it possible for me to provide more content, I offer additional chapters, as described above.

Thank you for your time, and thank you for your support.

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