Ahi Wi-Hongi is creating trans community support, resources, and advocacy
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Tena koutou katoa, I'm Ahi, my people are Ngapuhi in the far north, and Ngati Maniapoto in the Waikato. I'm takataapui taahine, which for me is sort of like transgender, non-binary, transmasculine, and hard femme. I guess I think of it like turning up the masculine dial and turning up the feminine dial. I'm very gender. lol. I'm the person with the bright magenta hair in the video trailer for Elizabeth Kerekere's Takataapui - Part of the Whaanau, and the video below is me delivering a training seminar to medical health care providers.
(You are welcome to use these videos).


Rather than he or she, I like to be referred to by te reo Maori genderless pronoun ia, or similar English pronouns like they/their/them.

Names and pronouns are only a very small part of learning how to respect someone as a whole person, but they can be a great place to start. They make you have to remember to respect a person every time you talk about them.

There are lots of other important things that people need to know so they can treat trans folks with respect and care. Some of these things are about being a loving and supportive whanau, being a good friend, knowing how to treat a partner, taking care of people in your community.

If you are a doctor, nurse, or other health care or service provider, there are even more things you need to know about trans people, so you can be supportive and effective in your work.

Some of these things are issues that various Ministries of the Government need to know about and understand, so they can make nation wide changes with regard to things like discrimination in health care, education, the justice system, and such.



There are so many things that are really hard for trans people, because society doesn't understand us, is prejudiced against us, or discriminates against us. Many of these things are covered in The Human Rights Act (1990), but we need an active, dedicated, and informed organisation run by trans peers to make sure that everyone is following through on treating trans people as equal humans.

We need a peer run organisation to assist trans, takataapui, and intersex folks to access the things they need and to have a chance to flourish.

So, with the help of trans, intersex, and takataapui friends, lovers, colleagues, and community, I set up an organisation, Gender Minorities Aotearoa, to do just that.

Gender Minorities Aotearoa is a peer led and cross cultural organisation for sex and gender minorities in Aotearoa. We run a national database of trans-friendly healthcare providers, community support groups, laser clinics, and other services, as well as hosting an up to date database of useful resources for trans, takataapui, and intersex folks and their partners, parents, whanau, and wider communities. We also run an op shop to raise funds and create a point of access, and we plan to open our first gender centre in 2018.

We are doing so much great work, and our communities are really involved and sending us info and feedback, sitting on panels with us, inviting us to speak at conferences, accessing our training workshops and using our resources, and working on various other projects.
We're flat out busy.

However, there are currently only two part time paid positions, and I work at least 20 hours a week on this but only get paid for 8 hours at an extremely modest rate for an ''executive director'' type job. I live in a squat with no proper bathroom because I can't afford to house my family.

So, here's my pitch: please become a patron and help pay my bills, so I can keep helping trans people and advancing trans health care and other rights. Community models rely on communities, and I really believe in us.

Thank you millions <3

Kia ora,

Ahi

**Note** Any donations made through this page help to support me directly, so I can coordinate or create resources for trans communities in Aotearoa.

You can read more about me and the other work I do on my website, which you can find here.

If you would like to support Gender Minorities Aotearoa directly you can find a list of ways to do that on GMA's website here.



Tena koutou katoa, I'm Ahi, my people are Ngapuhi in the far north, and Ngati Maniapoto in the Waikato. I'm takataapui taahine, which for me is sort of like transgender, non-binary, transmasculine, and hard femme. I guess I think of it like turning up the masculine dial and turning up the feminine dial. I'm very gender. lol. I'm the person with the bright magenta hair in the video trailer for Elizabeth Kerekere's Takataapui - Part of the Whaanau, and the video below is me delivering a training seminar to medical health care providers.
(You are welcome to use these videos).


Rather than he or she, I like to be referred to by te reo Maori genderless pronoun ia, or similar English pronouns like they/their/them.

Names and pronouns are only a very small part of learning how to respect someone as a whole person, but they can be a great place to start. They make you have to remember to respect a person every time you talk about them.

There are lots of other important things that people need to know so they can treat trans folks with respect and care. Some of these things are about being a loving and supportive whanau, being a good friend, knowing how to treat a partner, taking care of people in your community.

If you are a doctor, nurse, or other health care or service provider, there are even more things you need to know about trans people, so you can be supportive and effective in your work.

Some of these things are issues that various Ministries of the Government need to know about and understand, so they can make nation wide changes with regard to things like discrimination in health care, education, the justice system, and such.



There are so many things that are really hard for trans people, because society doesn't understand us, is prejudiced against us, or discriminates against us. Many of these things are covered in The Human Rights Act (1990), but we need an active, dedicated, and informed organisation run by trans peers to make sure that everyone is following through on treating trans people as equal humans.

We need a peer run organisation to assist trans, takataapui, and intersex folks to access the things they need and to have a chance to flourish.

So, with the help of trans, intersex, and takataapui friends, lovers, colleagues, and community, I set up an organisation, Gender Minorities Aotearoa, to do just that.

Gender Minorities Aotearoa is a peer led and cross cultural organisation for sex and gender minorities in Aotearoa. We run a national database of trans-friendly healthcare providers, community support groups, laser clinics, and other services, as well as hosting an up to date database of useful resources for trans, takataapui, and intersex folks and their partners, parents, whanau, and wider communities. We also run an op shop to raise funds and create a point of access, and we plan to open our first gender centre in 2018.

We are doing so much great work, and our communities are really involved and sending us info and feedback, sitting on panels with us, inviting us to speak at conferences, accessing our training workshops and using our resources, and working on various other projects.
We're flat out busy.

However, there are currently only two part time paid positions, and I work at least 20 hours a week on this but only get paid for 8 hours at an extremely modest rate for an ''executive director'' type job. I live in a squat with no proper bathroom because I can't afford to house my family.

So, here's my pitch: please become a patron and help pay my bills, so I can keep helping trans people and advancing trans health care and other rights. Community models rely on communities, and I really believe in us.

Thank you millions <3

Kia ora,

Ahi

**Note** Any donations made through this page help to support me directly, so I can coordinate or create resources for trans communities in Aotearoa.

You can read more about me and the other work I do on my website, which you can find here.

If you would like to support Gender Minorities Aotearoa directly you can find a list of ways to do that on GMA's website here.


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