Abdulrahim

is creating Music, Music Videos.

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M. Abdulrahim. Alsiadi received his B.A. from the Damascus Music Conservatory, where he specialized in oud performance and conducting. He studied with renowned oudist Nadim Al Darwish, the son of composer and scholar Ali Al Darwish, for many years. He performs on an Iraqi oud made by the oud master Yaroub Mohammed Fadel. A regular guest of international festivals both as a soloist and chamber musician, Alsiadi has recently performed at the Royal Conservatory in Toronto, the national auditorium in Madrid, the historic Nidaros Cathedral in Norway, GUST University in Kuwait, and Merkin Hall in New York City. Other highlights include his debuts at Vienna Konserthaus in 2012 and Carnegie Hall in 2015 with The Malek Jandali Trio, Skoll World Forum 2016, and Sydney Opera House. Alsiadi is particularly excited to be working with Aleppo Ensemble in recording his new album (Music of Aleppo). Alsiadi has also directed several concert series and festivals on Arabic music, and he has developed an extensive and exceptionally varied catalogue of Arabic music recordings. At various international conferences, he has presented research on song forms central to Middle Eastern music, namely Arabic-sung poetry called qasida, and the Aleppian Wasla, a song-form that is one of the foundations of Syrian songs. Alsiadi moved from Aleppo, Syria to New York City in 1996, becoming a professor of Arabic Language, Literature and Culture. He is currently the lead professor and director for the Arabic studies program at Fordham University, and he is the chair of the US-MidEast program at the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University. He is finalizing his doctorate in American Studies at Rutgers University and his research interests include Arab-American relations; the impact of Mideast-West relations on contemporary Arabic music and literature; and the diaspora of the Aleppian Wasla in the West. Over the last two decades, he has provided academic leadership, engaged in discussions and offered advice and support to fellow Syrians on civic society, academia and human rights. Alsiadi has been interviewed and been an analyst on TV and radio for a wide range of media sources including PBS, HuffPost LIVE, Al JazeeraABC, CBS , and Great Decisions in Foreign Policy. Each year, Alsiadi supports concerts for young audiences, and his performance groups offer master classes and other performance opportunities for our public schools and universities. Alsiadi is a dedicated professor committed to educating our youth about Middle Eastern chamber music and introducing students to the joys of the Aleppian Wasla, a traditional genre of Arab music. Alsiadi currently serves on the faculty of Rutgers University and Fordham University in New York City and teaches master classes in the U.S. and abroad.
M. Abdulrahim. Alsiadi received his B.A. from the Damascus Music Conservatory, where he specialized in oud performance and conducting. He studied with renowned oudist Nadim Al Darwish, the son of composer and scholar Ali Al Darwish, for many years. He performs on an Iraqi oud made by the oud master Yaroub Mohammed Fadel. A regular guest of international festivals both as a soloist and chamber musician, Alsiadi has recently performed at the Royal Conservatory in Toronto, the national auditorium in Madrid, the historic Nidaros Cathedral in Norway, GUST University in Kuwait, and Merkin Hall in New York City. Other highlights include his debuts at Vienna Konserthaus in 2012 and Carnegie Hall in 2015 with The Malek Jandali Trio, Skoll World Forum 2016, and Sydney Opera House. Alsiadi is particularly excited to be working with Aleppo Ensemble in recording his new album (Music of Aleppo). Alsiadi has also directed several concert series and festivals on Arabic music, and he has developed an extensive and exceptionally varied catalogue of Arabic music recordings. At various international conferences, he has presented research on song forms central to Middle Eastern music, namely Arabic-sung poetry called qasida, and the Aleppian Wasla, a song-form that is one of the foundations of Syrian songs. Alsiadi moved from Aleppo, Syria to New York City in 1996, becoming a professor of Arabic Language, Literature and Culture. He is currently the lead professor and director for the Arabic studies program at Fordham University, and he is the chair of the US-MidEast program at the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University. He is finalizing his doctorate in American Studies at Rutgers University and his research interests include Arab-American relations; the impact of Mideast-West relations on contemporary Arabic music and literature; and the diaspora of the Aleppian Wasla in the West. Over the last two decades, he has provided academic leadership, engaged in discussions and offered advice and support to fellow Syrians on civic society, academia and human rights. Alsiadi has been interviewed and been an analyst on TV and radio for a wide range of media sources including PBS, HuffPost LIVE, Al JazeeraABC, CBS , and Great Decisions in Foreign Policy. Each year, Alsiadi supports concerts for young audiences, and his performance groups offer master classes and other performance opportunities for our public schools and universities. Alsiadi is a dedicated professor committed to educating our youth about Middle Eastern chamber music and introducing students to the joys of the Aleppian Wasla, a traditional genre of Arab music. Alsiadi currently serves on the faculty of Rutgers University and Fordham University in New York City and teaches master classes in the U.S. and abroad.

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