John Bramblitt is creating Paintings and helping others to do the same!
8

patrons

If you just arrived here click on "Posts" up above for a sampling of what you get. If you want to know more about me then keep reading.

Thank you for being interested in my art enough to want to stop by, and to even think about supporting what I do; that makes you pretty incredible in my book! I want to chat with you, paint with you, show you how I paint, give away free art, and basically have some fun and explore this incredible world of art with you.

We are creating exclusive content for Patreon only supporters - if you are on here then you are a super fan and we want to show you some love. Exclusive videos, bigger chances to win art giveaways, inside peeks into the studio, one on one talks and instruction, step by step art tutorials, materials to help your art such as drawings and reference photos, live models, Live exclusive web shows with chat, and much more all for our supporters.

We have a name for our supporters: Drastic Art Members
Taken from the word: Drastic - (adjective) Likely to have a strong or far-reaching effect; radical and extreme.

Hello, my name is John, and I’m a Drastic Art Member (I sound like I just joined a support group or something doesn’t it, ha)



I've been a professional artist since 2005 working with museums, galleries, non-profits and charities all over the world. We’ve received presidential recognition for my work three times, as well as the Most Inspirational Video on Youtube Award, as well as a host of other awards from all over including being ranked as the #1 blind painter in the world by TopTenz. I’ve worked with celebrities a little bit, but mostly it is my friends and people that I meet that end up in my paintings. I’ve been featured on every major network, and in dozens of papers and media outlets all over the world including the BBC, New York times, Washington Post, Discovery Channel, etc. The attention that I have received for my work is humbling to me. The truth is that I’m a simple painter who feels most at home behind an easel. Painting is very personal to me; it is my way of dealing with the ups and downs in life, and also my way of viewing the world. My goal is to make the best paintings that I can, to express myself a little better everyday, and one of my greatest joys is to help others to do the same.

I lost the last bit of my eyesight in 2001, and then began painting in 2002 - seems backwards doesn’t it? To be honest I thought I was crazy - I mean surely it is called the ‘Visual’ arts for a reason, but as it turns out… nope. Your eyes have very little to do with art. Art is about your ideas and feeling and communicating that to others. If your hands can take the place of your eyes then you have leveled the playing field, and the only thing that is left that can hold you back is yourself. If you can have belief and persistence in yourself and what you want to do there is very little that can hold you back.

Our Work with Museums, Charities and Non-profits
The first art shows I did I didn’t tell people I was blind. I just wanted people’s focus to be on the art rather than me. The shows did well, and some stories were written and it came out that I was blind - this led to something wonderful happening. I was contacted by various charities and non-profits that wanted me to come and speak to their people and lead workshops catered to their needs. This was at a time when I was still adjusting to being blind, and a funny thing happened. I would travel around the country speaking to different groups, and even though they were far away from where I lived, and might be going through very different experiences such as soldiers with PTSD, or children with Autism I felt like I was home. Even though the particulars of what we were going through were different, the shared experience of dealing with problems in our lives made us kindred spirits.

As I traveled and worked I began to realize that my Epilepsy and Visual Impairment didn’t separate me from everyone else; instead it brought me closer. Everyone deals with issues or events in their lives that tries them; that sometimes feels bigger than they are. Working with people that were actively trying to make their lives better inspired me, and the help that I brought might not be much, but it was something that I cherished and it made me feel good in a way that I hadn’t felt in a long time. As an Epileptic and a blind person I had felt that I couldn’t make a change in the world anymore - that for all intents and purposes I was done. Working with these groups proved to me that each of us has the power to affect a change in others, and that working together that change is amplified. Most charities and non-profits operate on a shoestring so I began piggybacking events together. A major gallery or museum that could afford to have me out to a city, and paid the expenses for me being there meant that I could add a few days to my trip, and I could visit groups and organizations that never would have been able to afford the expense of flying someone out. Instead of flying into a city and just working with one organization I would work with sometimes up to 6. One or two being able to foot the bill, and the others who are just as important being able to join in as well.

Through the art auctions and ticket sales for workshops and talks we have been able to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for charity - we raise far more money on any given year than we actually make ourselves, but more valuable to me than this are the people I have met and friends that I have made all over. Once I had thought I was incapable of doing anything new and I felt alone and isolated, but today I have friendships that span the globe. When I say that I feel blessed, and that my life is more colorful and that I’m happier than ever before I hope you can see why, and that these aren’t just mere words. It is the people around us that color our world, and I am so thankful that my life is colored by such a rich palette thanks to the amazing people I meet.



I’ve had the pleasure of working as a consultant, lecturer, guest artist, and my most favorite leading workshops and classes at dozens of museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Dallas Museum of Art, Meadows Museum, and others. The reason museums ask to have me in is simply my philosophy that art is for everyone and the methods I use creates an environment where that is possible. If you are visually impaired, have a hearing impairment, Autism, Alzheimer's or some other disability, if you are visiting this country and English isn’t your first language, if you have no disability but you actually want to get hands on and more involved with the art, and who doesn’t, then we actually make that happen. I’ve sat on panels next to the Guggenheim and attended by museums all over the world all wanting to know how to change their museum to be more interactive and accommodating for everyone. We change the museum environment from one that feels like you are in a stuffy library to one where people are laughing and energized by the art.

How I Paint
If you’re wondering how a visually impaired (blind) person paints, let me fill you in, and surprisingly it is very much how a sighted person paints except that I use my hands to do the work that a person’s eyes would normally do. First off, art was always a big part of my life as a kid, and I’ll get into that later. For now though it is enough to know that I understood composition and was and experienced at drawing and illustrating - so even though I hadn’t painted before I wasn’t starting completely from scratch. If you are blind you use your sense of touch to feel and understand the world around you, to spatially orient yourself, in other words to know where one thing is in relation to another. When I first lost my sight I began Orientation and Mobility training - this is where you learn how to use the white cane and touch to navigate around a room or even a city. You learn how to sew on buttons, and and how to cook and eat and every other thing you would normally do in a day, but by just using your other senses such as touch and hearing.

When I was finally able to travel independently from my apartment and find my classes at University I began to think that perhaps I could use the same techniques and guide myself across a canvas in the same way. I was using my sense of touch for everything else so why not that? I began drawing using paint that left raised lines that I could feel. With every new line that I drew it gave me more to feel on the canvas making navigating my way around easier. At first the drawings were incredibly simple - circles, squares, etc. I went from being sighted and being able to draw pretty much anything I wanted to now doing simple geometric shapes, but I found it exhilarating - I had thought that art was lost to me forever, but now I was finding my way back in. I practiced constantly when not in class; up to 16 hours a day on some days. Growing up art had been with me everyday helping me deal with all sorts of issues, and now that I had it again I just couldn’t get enough. My drawings began to improve, and most thrilling to me was I had begun to experiment with color.

I would Braille my paints so that I could just read the labels to sort my colors. When it came to mixing the different hues I would mix different mediums into the paint to actually make each color feel different. I could mix the Titanium White to feel thick like toothpaste, and then mix a Bone Black to feel runny like oil. The textures were so different from each other keeping the colors separate was easy - while a sighted person would tell a color by looking it became more and more normal for me to tell color by the way it felt once I mixed it. If I wanted a grey halfway between black and white I would just mix the thick white and thin black together until the viscosity of the paint was halfway in between the two. In this way I could control the color through touch alone. I started with only 2 colors (black, white, and red), and then would add another color onto my palette every few months or so. Looking back it was slow going, but everyday I was learning something new, with every mistake I learned what not to do, and began a process I continue to this day - experimentation and persistence.

You don’t need eyesight to appreciate or even create art - art comes from our minds and hearts. Anyone can learn to express themselves through paint.

Our crew:
John - you’ve probably heard an ear full about me already so nuff said; I’ll just take this moment to thank you again for being here.

Jacqi - The brains of the operation (Don’t tell her I said that). Jacqi runs the business and deals with the museums, galleries, non-profits and charities, international and national art sales, as well as all of the images of the art. She got her undergrad in Art photography and her Masters in Design, and is just a powerhouse when it comes to info about the modern art market, and how to navigate these changing waters.

Jack - Our son and resident consultant on all things Minecraft, Lego, and video games from vintage to what’s not even out yet. He’s on a 2 year winning streak at his school for being voted sweetest kid in class, and also class clown - what a combination!

Eagle - My new Guide Dog. When you work with a guide dog you are a team; I tell her where to go and she gets me there. Half the time I don’t know who’s in charge, me or her, all I know is that we always end up at the same place together, and that’s good enough for me. Wherever you find me you will also find this yellow furry ball of cuteness by my side.

Echo - My retired Guide Dog. Mostly these days in between snores she’s holding the floor down, but always ready to give a little encouragement when needed. She has definitely earned a rest; she was inducted into the Texas Animal Hall of Fame for all the work she has done - over 600 flights in her career, she has rolled on the floor with Jeff Bridges, been the center of attention at Children's hospitals, she has met senators and governor's, romped in the back yard with my son, launched countless art openings, and has never been more than a few steps away from my side for a decade.

One last thing
I have to be the luckiest person in the world; think about it - a blind guy has this crazy dream of being an artist, and instead of people laughing and walking away some of you accept me into the fold and allow me to share this journey with you. I’ve had some tough times, but one thing I’ve learned that instead of this making me different from everyone else it does just the opposite. All of us have had to deal with bad situations, and been put into tough spots. I’ve been able to navigate these dark waters thanks to the people around me. I love the stories of artists hanging out in coffee shops in Paris in the 20's, or of groups of artists getting together to make movements - where do you think all those isms in the art books come from - it is just people like you and I who get together and share ideas and experiences, and that grows into something bigger than any one person. I got into art because I needed to - it is the way I deal with the world, and also celebrate the world, but I started showing not really to put my art out there; that was a side effect, but the real reason was to meet other people as obsessed with art as I was, and that is still true today.

I am one of those crazy people that think about art all day and then dream about it all night, but I do have a reason was I’m so obsessed with art. I was born with Epilepsy and kidney disease - had my left kidney removed by the time I was 7, and then ended up getting Lyme’s Disease. I began drawing I think before I could walk, and quickly discovered that creating artwork was a great way to deal with a bad day, but it was also an incredible way to celebrate a good day. I literally drew everyday. As I grew older I read every book I could about art, and took every class I could get into. I did art every day of my life until I lost my eyesight, and then I thought it was gone forever. Even when I started painting it never occurred to me anyone would ever see a painting of mine, or that I’d be able to share conversations with other artists. I have never been so happy to be wrong in my life, and as much as I’d like to say it was all me I know in my heart that as it was true then, and is still true now, it was the people around me that pushed me up and made my art come true. I wish the same drastic goodness for you too. Thanks for listening; I hope you’ll join me in creating something special! 
Rewards
Drastic Art Member
$1 or more per month
$1 - Congratulations you are officially a Drastic Art Member! Pat your DAM self on the back - you deserve it! You are officially invited to all the exclusive member's only DAM LIVE Shows (at least one a month), and get a look at what's coming out of the studio before it hits social media 
  • Behind the scenes look at the studio before others (photos, videos, media content)
  • Exclusive Access to a Member's Only DAM LIVE show
Drastic Art Maker
$7 or more per month
$7 - Your name in Lights! Your name will be placed in the credits at the end of every Video. We'll shoot 1 exclusive video (at least) every month - We'll take polls to see what you want in the videos, and we'll choose some too. PLUS: Access to drawings, line art, and reference photos to help your art along. 10% discount code for the store. Automatic Entry into give-a-ways. We play games to win free art during the live shows, but you don't have to even be there to win - your name is automatically put into the hat!
  • Credit in videos
  • Exclusive Videos
  • Drawings, Reference Photos for your own making
  • 10% discount
  • Automatic Entry into contests
  • Plus all previous awards
Drastic Art Master
$25 or more per month
$25 - Everything from the lower tiers PLUS: Live sip and paint style workshops (Step by step tutorials) with chat. We will do at least one new painting a month - all info will be made available in advance as well as access to all past Sip and Paint workshops. Plus a gift bag including a free print, a DAM t-shirt, and some other goodies as well as a 15% discount code for the store.
  • Sip and Paint style online workshop (up to 2 hours) with no more than 10 participants, multiple times will be scheduled.
  • 15% discount from online store
  • Gift bag 
  • Plus all previous awards
DAM Royalty
$100 or more per month
$100 - What are ya nuts?! This level is for those that order top shelf everywhere they go, and sit at the high rollers table while the rest of us peek at ya from the other side of the velvet ropes. You get everything from the lower tiers plus, and this next part makes this tier actually free... you know, sorta. With the purchase of an original piece of art you can apply all of your Patreon donations to it - that's up to $1200 for the year. So you get the artwork the same as anyone would who bought my work from a gallery or online, but with all the added bonuses of being an incredible supporter.
  • Credit towards an original or consultant/speaking fee visit
  • Plus all previous awards
Goals
8 of 100 patrons
When we hit the 100 mark we will throw a Drastic Live Show Art Party! The Drastic Art Members will decide what we do at the party - the theme, live models, the art we do, art give a ways - the possibilities are endless! 
1 of 1
If you just arrived here click on "Posts" up above for a sampling of what you get. If you want to know more about me then keep reading.

Thank you for being interested in my art enough to want to stop by, and to even think about supporting what I do; that makes you pretty incredible in my book! I want to chat with you, paint with you, show you how I paint, give away free art, and basically have some fun and explore this incredible world of art with you.

We are creating exclusive content for Patreon only supporters - if you are on here then you are a super fan and we want to show you some love. Exclusive videos, bigger chances to win art giveaways, inside peeks into the studio, one on one talks and instruction, step by step art tutorials, materials to help your art such as drawings and reference photos, live models, Live exclusive web shows with chat, and much more all for our supporters.

We have a name for our supporters: Drastic Art Members
Taken from the word: Drastic - (adjective) Likely to have a strong or far-reaching effect; radical and extreme.

Hello, my name is John, and I’m a Drastic Art Member (I sound like I just joined a support group or something doesn’t it, ha)



I've been a professional artist since 2005 working with museums, galleries, non-profits and charities all over the world. We’ve received presidential recognition for my work three times, as well as the Most Inspirational Video on Youtube Award, as well as a host of other awards from all over including being ranked as the #1 blind painter in the world by TopTenz. I’ve worked with celebrities a little bit, but mostly it is my friends and people that I meet that end up in my paintings. I’ve been featured on every major network, and in dozens of papers and media outlets all over the world including the BBC, New York times, Washington Post, Discovery Channel, etc. The attention that I have received for my work is humbling to me. The truth is that I’m a simple painter who feels most at home behind an easel. Painting is very personal to me; it is my way of dealing with the ups and downs in life, and also my way of viewing the world. My goal is to make the best paintings that I can, to express myself a little better everyday, and one of my greatest joys is to help others to do the same.

I lost the last bit of my eyesight in 2001, and then began painting in 2002 - seems backwards doesn’t it? To be honest I thought I was crazy - I mean surely it is called the ‘Visual’ arts for a reason, but as it turns out… nope. Your eyes have very little to do with art. Art is about your ideas and feeling and communicating that to others. If your hands can take the place of your eyes then you have leveled the playing field, and the only thing that is left that can hold you back is yourself. If you can have belief and persistence in yourself and what you want to do there is very little that can hold you back.

Our Work with Museums, Charities and Non-profits
The first art shows I did I didn’t tell people I was blind. I just wanted people’s focus to be on the art rather than me. The shows did well, and some stories were written and it came out that I was blind - this led to something wonderful happening. I was contacted by various charities and non-profits that wanted me to come and speak to their people and lead workshops catered to their needs. This was at a time when I was still adjusting to being blind, and a funny thing happened. I would travel around the country speaking to different groups, and even though they were far away from where I lived, and might be going through very different experiences such as soldiers with PTSD, or children with Autism I felt like I was home. Even though the particulars of what we were going through were different, the shared experience of dealing with problems in our lives made us kindred spirits.

As I traveled and worked I began to realize that my Epilepsy and Visual Impairment didn’t separate me from everyone else; instead it brought me closer. Everyone deals with issues or events in their lives that tries them; that sometimes feels bigger than they are. Working with people that were actively trying to make their lives better inspired me, and the help that I brought might not be much, but it was something that I cherished and it made me feel good in a way that I hadn’t felt in a long time. As an Epileptic and a blind person I had felt that I couldn’t make a change in the world anymore - that for all intents and purposes I was done. Working with these groups proved to me that each of us has the power to affect a change in others, and that working together that change is amplified. Most charities and non-profits operate on a shoestring so I began piggybacking events together. A major gallery or museum that could afford to have me out to a city, and paid the expenses for me being there meant that I could add a few days to my trip, and I could visit groups and organizations that never would have been able to afford the expense of flying someone out. Instead of flying into a city and just working with one organization I would work with sometimes up to 6. One or two being able to foot the bill, and the others who are just as important being able to join in as well.

Through the art auctions and ticket sales for workshops and talks we have been able to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for charity - we raise far more money on any given year than we actually make ourselves, but more valuable to me than this are the people I have met and friends that I have made all over. Once I had thought I was incapable of doing anything new and I felt alone and isolated, but today I have friendships that span the globe. When I say that I feel blessed, and that my life is more colorful and that I’m happier than ever before I hope you can see why, and that these aren’t just mere words. It is the people around us that color our world, and I am so thankful that my life is colored by such a rich palette thanks to the amazing people I meet.



I’ve had the pleasure of working as a consultant, lecturer, guest artist, and my most favorite leading workshops and classes at dozens of museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Dallas Museum of Art, Meadows Museum, and others. The reason museums ask to have me in is simply my philosophy that art is for everyone and the methods I use creates an environment where that is possible. If you are visually impaired, have a hearing impairment, Autism, Alzheimer's or some other disability, if you are visiting this country and English isn’t your first language, if you have no disability but you actually want to get hands on and more involved with the art, and who doesn’t, then we actually make that happen. I’ve sat on panels next to the Guggenheim and attended by museums all over the world all wanting to know how to change their museum to be more interactive and accommodating for everyone. We change the museum environment from one that feels like you are in a stuffy library to one where people are laughing and energized by the art.

How I Paint
If you’re wondering how a visually impaired (blind) person paints, let me fill you in, and surprisingly it is very much how a sighted person paints except that I use my hands to do the work that a person’s eyes would normally do. First off, art was always a big part of my life as a kid, and I’ll get into that later. For now though it is enough to know that I understood composition and was and experienced at drawing and illustrating - so even though I hadn’t painted before I wasn’t starting completely from scratch. If you are blind you use your sense of touch to feel and understand the world around you, to spatially orient yourself, in other words to know where one thing is in relation to another. When I first lost my sight I began Orientation and Mobility training - this is where you learn how to use the white cane and touch to navigate around a room or even a city. You learn how to sew on buttons, and and how to cook and eat and every other thing you would normally do in a day, but by just using your other senses such as touch and hearing.

When I was finally able to travel independently from my apartment and find my classes at University I began to think that perhaps I could use the same techniques and guide myself across a canvas in the same way. I was using my sense of touch for everything else so why not that? I began drawing using paint that left raised lines that I could feel. With every new line that I drew it gave me more to feel on the canvas making navigating my way around easier. At first the drawings were incredibly simple - circles, squares, etc. I went from being sighted and being able to draw pretty much anything I wanted to now doing simple geometric shapes, but I found it exhilarating - I had thought that art was lost to me forever, but now I was finding my way back in. I practiced constantly when not in class; up to 16 hours a day on some days. Growing up art had been with me everyday helping me deal with all sorts of issues, and now that I had it again I just couldn’t get enough. My drawings began to improve, and most thrilling to me was I had begun to experiment with color.

I would Braille my paints so that I could just read the labels to sort my colors. When it came to mixing the different hues I would mix different mediums into the paint to actually make each color feel different. I could mix the Titanium White to feel thick like toothpaste, and then mix a Bone Black to feel runny like oil. The textures were so different from each other keeping the colors separate was easy - while a sighted person would tell a color by looking it became more and more normal for me to tell color by the way it felt once I mixed it. If I wanted a grey halfway between black and white I would just mix the thick white and thin black together until the viscosity of the paint was halfway in between the two. In this way I could control the color through touch alone. I started with only 2 colors (black, white, and red), and then would add another color onto my palette every few months or so. Looking back it was slow going, but everyday I was learning something new, with every mistake I learned what not to do, and began a process I continue to this day - experimentation and persistence.

You don’t need eyesight to appreciate or even create art - art comes from our minds and hearts. Anyone can learn to express themselves through paint.

Our crew:
John - you’ve probably heard an ear full about me already so nuff said; I’ll just take this moment to thank you again for being here.

Jacqi - The brains of the operation (Don’t tell her I said that). Jacqi runs the business and deals with the museums, galleries, non-profits and charities, international and national art sales, as well as all of the images of the art. She got her undergrad in Art photography and her Masters in Design, and is just a powerhouse when it comes to info about the modern art market, and how to navigate these changing waters.

Jack - Our son and resident consultant on all things Minecraft, Lego, and video games from vintage to what’s not even out yet. He’s on a 2 year winning streak at his school for being voted sweetest kid in class, and also class clown - what a combination!

Eagle - My new Guide Dog. When you work with a guide dog you are a team; I tell her where to go and she gets me there. Half the time I don’t know who’s in charge, me or her, all I know is that we always end up at the same place together, and that’s good enough for me. Wherever you find me you will also find this yellow furry ball of cuteness by my side.

Echo - My retired Guide Dog. Mostly these days in between snores she’s holding the floor down, but always ready to give a little encouragement when needed. She has definitely earned a rest; she was inducted into the Texas Animal Hall of Fame for all the work she has done - over 600 flights in her career, she has rolled on the floor with Jeff Bridges, been the center of attention at Children's hospitals, she has met senators and governor's, romped in the back yard with my son, launched countless art openings, and has never been more than a few steps away from my side for a decade.

One last thing
I have to be the luckiest person in the world; think about it - a blind guy has this crazy dream of being an artist, and instead of people laughing and walking away some of you accept me into the fold and allow me to share this journey with you. I’ve had some tough times, but one thing I’ve learned that instead of this making me different from everyone else it does just the opposite. All of us have had to deal with bad situations, and been put into tough spots. I’ve been able to navigate these dark waters thanks to the people around me. I love the stories of artists hanging out in coffee shops in Paris in the 20's, or of groups of artists getting together to make movements - where do you think all those isms in the art books come from - it is just people like you and I who get together and share ideas and experiences, and that grows into something bigger than any one person. I got into art because I needed to - it is the way I deal with the world, and also celebrate the world, but I started showing not really to put my art out there; that was a side effect, but the real reason was to meet other people as obsessed with art as I was, and that is still true today.

I am one of those crazy people that think about art all day and then dream about it all night, but I do have a reason was I’m so obsessed with art. I was born with Epilepsy and kidney disease - had my left kidney removed by the time I was 7, and then ended up getting Lyme’s Disease. I began drawing I think before I could walk, and quickly discovered that creating artwork was a great way to deal with a bad day, but it was also an incredible way to celebrate a good day. I literally drew everyday. As I grew older I read every book I could about art, and took every class I could get into. I did art every day of my life until I lost my eyesight, and then I thought it was gone forever. Even when I started painting it never occurred to me anyone would ever see a painting of mine, or that I’d be able to share conversations with other artists. I have never been so happy to be wrong in my life, and as much as I’d like to say it was all me I know in my heart that as it was true then, and is still true now, it was the people around me that pushed me up and made my art come true. I wish the same drastic goodness for you too. Thanks for listening; I hope you’ll join me in creating something special! 

Recent posts by John Bramblitt

Rewards
Drastic Art Member
$1 or more per month
$1 - Congratulations you are officially a Drastic Art Member! Pat your DAM self on the back - you deserve it! You are officially invited to all the exclusive member's only DAM LIVE Shows (at least one a month), and get a look at what's coming out of the studio before it hits social media 
  • Behind the scenes look at the studio before others (photos, videos, media content)
  • Exclusive Access to a Member's Only DAM LIVE show
Drastic Art Maker
$7 or more per month
$7 - Your name in Lights! Your name will be placed in the credits at the end of every Video. We'll shoot 1 exclusive video (at least) every month - We'll take polls to see what you want in the videos, and we'll choose some too. PLUS: Access to drawings, line art, and reference photos to help your art along. 10% discount code for the store. Automatic Entry into give-a-ways. We play games to win free art during the live shows, but you don't have to even be there to win - your name is automatically put into the hat!
  • Credit in videos
  • Exclusive Videos
  • Drawings, Reference Photos for your own making
  • 10% discount
  • Automatic Entry into contests
  • Plus all previous awards
Drastic Art Master
$25 or more per month
$25 - Everything from the lower tiers PLUS: Live sip and paint style workshops (Step by step tutorials) with chat. We will do at least one new painting a month - all info will be made available in advance as well as access to all past Sip and Paint workshops. Plus a gift bag including a free print, a DAM t-shirt, and some other goodies as well as a 15% discount code for the store.
  • Sip and Paint style online workshop (up to 2 hours) with no more than 10 participants, multiple times will be scheduled.
  • 15% discount from online store
  • Gift bag 
  • Plus all previous awards
DAM Royalty
$100 or more per month
$100 - What are ya nuts?! This level is for those that order top shelf everywhere they go, and sit at the high rollers table while the rest of us peek at ya from the other side of the velvet ropes. You get everything from the lower tiers plus, and this next part makes this tier actually free... you know, sorta. With the purchase of an original piece of art you can apply all of your Patreon donations to it - that's up to $1200 for the year. So you get the artwork the same as anyone would who bought my work from a gallery or online, but with all the added bonuses of being an incredible supporter.
  • Credit towards an original or consultant/speaking fee visit
  • Plus all previous awards