Curtis H. Stratton

is creating Throne of Thorns

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Following King Arthur’s death, claimants and invaders fight for control of Camelot. A historical fantasy serial written by Curtis H. Stratton.

After nearly four hundred years of Roman control, Britain was free to rule itself once the final legions withdrew at the turn of the 5th century. The Britons were a disunified people, scattered from the shores of Brittany to the upper boundaries of the Antonine Wall. Their shared Celtic-Roman roots did little to dissuade the petty kings from warring with each other, and Britain bled without any true master. Then, a prince descended from the hills of Wales and bent the seven Briton kings to his will, raising a fortress on the ruins of a Roman fort in Somerset. The man was hailed as "the King of the Britons," and his home at Camelot became famous for his equites, or Roman-era knights, who sat around a round table and helped him maintain peace across Britain.

By the mid-400s CE, Britain was again broken. King Arthur, despite his ability to unify the kingdoms, made a fatal error in trusting the foreign Saxons to help against the raiding Picts and Irish. The subsequent rebellion against Arthur, led by his own nephew Mordred and joined by many of Arthur’s oldest vassals — who found his decision to allow foreigners onto their lands unacceptable — resulted in Arthur’s defeat and disappearance.

A decade passed before the remaining seven Briton kings were called together in assembly to decide a successor. The battle for the throne of Camelot was a treacherous one, especially as two of Arthur's greatest equites, Lancelot and Gawain, wrestled with the changing world.

As the Briton kings struggled and coalesced, the second and third threats loomed from abroad. The Romans battled Attila the Hun in modern-day France, but a mysterious letter to their commander implored Roman intervention in Britain against the Saxons, whose east coast dominance crept inland with each passing month.

The third and most dangerous threat was not one of sword or banner, but weather and faith. The Irish tribes were unified by the legendary Niall of Nine Hostages, and their native island was plagued by poor crops: a European-wide phenomenon which saw the River Rhine freeze and barbarian tribes head west. Weather alone didn't motivate the Irish High King to mobilize his people to invade Britain, as a fiery religion, birthed by Saint Patrick, instilled a sense of purpose in converting the still quasi-pagan Britons north of Hadrian’s Wall — beyond which, the tribal Picts lived untouched.

These threads interwove and dominated a generational saga, one which asked: who should be the master of Britain and true successor to Arthur? As Merlin awakened and new players joined the fray, the battle would define a people and decide the ultimate fate of Camelot, the Knights of the Round Table, and Britain itself.
Tiers
Eques
$5 or more per month
  • Featured in special shout-out.
  • Gets a character named after them.
Bannerman
$10 or more per month
  • Early access to chapters as soon as they're written, instead of waiting until publication.
  • Featured in special shout-out.
  • Gets a character named after them.
Claimant
$20 or more per month
  • Exclusive background content, maps, insights, and lore.
  • Early access to chapters as soon as they're written, instead of waiting until publication.
  • Featured in special shout-out.
  • Gets a character named after them.
Following King Arthur’s death, claimants and invaders fight for control of Camelot. A historical fantasy serial written by Curtis H. Stratton.

After nearly four hundred years of Roman control, Britain was free to rule itself once the final legions withdrew at the turn of the 5th century. The Britons were a disunified people, scattered from the shores of Brittany to the upper boundaries of the Antonine Wall. Their shared Celtic-Roman roots did little to dissuade the petty kings from warring with each other, and Britain bled without any true master. Then, a prince descended from the hills of Wales and bent the seven Briton kings to his will, raising a fortress on the ruins of a Roman fort in Somerset. The man was hailed as "the King of the Britons," and his home at Camelot became famous for his equites, or Roman-era knights, who sat around a round table and helped him maintain peace across Britain.

By the mid-400s CE, Britain was again broken. King Arthur, despite his ability to unify the kingdoms, made a fatal error in trusting the foreign Saxons to help against the raiding Picts and Irish. The subsequent rebellion against Arthur, led by his own nephew Mordred and joined by many of Arthur’s oldest vassals — who found his decision to allow foreigners onto their lands unacceptable — resulted in Arthur’s defeat and disappearance.

A decade passed before the remaining seven Briton kings were called together in assembly to decide a successor. The battle for the throne of Camelot was a treacherous one, especially as two of Arthur's greatest equites, Lancelot and Gawain, wrestled with the changing world.

As the Briton kings struggled and coalesced, the second and third threats loomed from abroad. The Romans battled Attila the Hun in modern-day France, but a mysterious letter to their commander implored Roman intervention in Britain against the Saxons, whose east coast dominance crept inland with each passing month.

The third and most dangerous threat was not one of sword or banner, but weather and faith. The Irish tribes were unified by the legendary Niall of Nine Hostages, and their native island was plagued by poor crops: a European-wide phenomenon which saw the River Rhine freeze and barbarian tribes head west. Weather alone didn't motivate the Irish High King to mobilize his people to invade Britain, as a fiery religion, birthed by Saint Patrick, instilled a sense of purpose in converting the still quasi-pagan Britons north of Hadrian’s Wall — beyond which, the tribal Picts lived untouched.

These threads interwove and dominated a generational saga, one which asked: who should be the master of Britain and true successor to Arthur? As Merlin awakened and new players joined the fray, the battle would define a people and decide the ultimate fate of Camelot, the Knights of the Round Table, and Britain itself.

Recent posts by Curtis H. Stratton

Tiers
Eques
$5 or more per month
  • Featured in special shout-out.
  • Gets a character named after them.
Bannerman
$10 or more per month
  • Early access to chapters as soon as they're written, instead of waiting until publication.
  • Featured in special shout-out.
  • Gets a character named after them.
Claimant
$20 or more per month
  • Exclusive background content, maps, insights, and lore.
  • Early access to chapters as soon as they're written, instead of waiting until publication.
  • Featured in special shout-out.
  • Gets a character named after them.