Jannis R is creating JavaScript tools for better public transportation services
3

patrons

$3
per month

What do you do? Why do you do it?


Public transportation is a great thing, but stuck within the status quo. Help me making public transport more user-friendly, machine-readable and accessible.

Right now, much is being organised using closed systems. This does not play well with our connected, fast-paced digital world. Proper APIs and open data need to be the basis for useful apps and accessible services. Public transportation will only have its positive impact on social mobility, the environment and the city if is being used. In terms of user-friendliness, it must be able to compete with private means of transport, such as cars, taxis.

After I had gotten in touch with the Berlin public transport APIs by accident, I went down the rabbit hole, exploring what can be done in order to make using public transport services in Berlin, Germany and Europe more convenient. Fast forward three years, this has become my daily endeavor:

I run multiple APIs that provide public transport data to apps and services. I want to maintain and enhance them further, e.g. by combining data from multiple sources.
- Because the IT behind public transport networks is mostly monopolised throughout Europe, many of my libraries can also be used to access other systems. Expanding their coverage is something that requires work.
- With friends, I created the Friendly Public Transport Format, which is an attempt (yet another) to create a truly user-friendly and un-overengineered format for public transport data. I want to create tooling to convert from and to other common formats like GTFS.
- All of my code is open source and I try to document all the knowledge I acquire. If I stopped working on this, others would be able to continue.

Why do you need money for this?

Recently, I've started to work at Deutsche Bahn. I'm aware that I'm in a privileged position. Nevertheless, the sector of public transport is a place where open source work like mine is often not valued, let alone seen as necessary. Especially connecting public transport networks, for the benefit of everyone, is something that almost no company pursues. Independent support will allow me to keep working on what I – and assume you as well – think is truly important for passenger-friendly, accessible public transport services.
Goals
$3 of $60 per month
I need 60€ per month for my monthly public transport ticket.
1 of 1

What do you do? Why do you do it?


Public transportation is a great thing, but stuck within the status quo. Help me making public transport more user-friendly, machine-readable and accessible.

Right now, much is being organised using closed systems. This does not play well with our connected, fast-paced digital world. Proper APIs and open data need to be the basis for useful apps and accessible services. Public transportation will only have its positive impact on social mobility, the environment and the city if is being used. In terms of user-friendliness, it must be able to compete with private means of transport, such as cars, taxis.

After I had gotten in touch with the Berlin public transport APIs by accident, I went down the rabbit hole, exploring what can be done in order to make using public transport services in Berlin, Germany and Europe more convenient. Fast forward three years, this has become my daily endeavor:

I run multiple APIs that provide public transport data to apps and services. I want to maintain and enhance them further, e.g. by combining data from multiple sources.
- Because the IT behind public transport networks is mostly monopolised throughout Europe, many of my libraries can also be used to access other systems. Expanding their coverage is something that requires work.
- With friends, I created the Friendly Public Transport Format, which is an attempt (yet another) to create a truly user-friendly and un-overengineered format for public transport data. I want to create tooling to convert from and to other common formats like GTFS.
- All of my code is open source and I try to document all the knowledge I acquire. If I stopped working on this, others would be able to continue.

Why do you need money for this?

Recently, I've started to work at Deutsche Bahn. I'm aware that I'm in a privileged position. Nevertheless, the sector of public transport is a place where open source work like mine is often not valued, let alone seen as necessary. Especially connecting public transport networks, for the benefit of everyone, is something that almost no company pursues. Independent support will allow me to keep working on what I – and assume you as well – think is truly important for passenger-friendly, accessible public transport services.

Recent posts by Jannis R