Desmond Liang

is creating island life inspired arts and gifts from Okinawa, Japan

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Family

$5
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Includes:
  • Patron-only community
  • 10% discount to shop online
  • Behind the scenes content
  • Free access to all paid digital products.
  • Work-in-progress updates (digital)
  • Behind-the-scenes content
  • Digital downloads

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$10
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  • And everything in the previous tier, plus
  • 20% discount to shop online.
  • Voting power
  • One time, A4 size art print.
  • Early access to new product launch, popup, and proviate exhibition
  • Work-in-progress updates (digital)
  • Behind-the-scenes content
  • Digital downloads
  • Exclusive voting power

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About Desmond Liang

My name is Desmond Liang. I live in Okinawa, Japan - a small island in the south Pacific. I came here to escape the corporate life and start a family. Along the way, I pick up my childhood hobby of making art. I try to inject as much island life to my work for those who seek an escape from their busy life. You may not have heard of Okinawa, you may not know about me until this moment, but I want to invite you to go on a journey with me to build a thriving career as a full time, independent artist on a small island. 

Support my journey, so I can continue to bring you a breath of Okinawa sea breeze through my art every week. 

How did I end up becoming an artist in Okinawa?

I was born and raised in southern China, studied and worked in Canada and the US. My parents sent me to an art weekend program when I was four, and I progressed to more advanced art study programs until I reach high school.

While I was working in the US as a marketing software developer, I like to take a break and walk around the block around 3 P.M. During my walk, I thought a lot about my future.

How many more years am I going to write code on a computer? What is it like at the end of that journey? 

There is a patio restaurant on my route, and I notice a well-dressed man at the restaurant had always drunk Whiskey in the afternoon while he is writing something on his notebook. One day, I approached him and asked

"Sir, can I ask what you do for a living? How do you get to enjoy a drink at this time in a patio when most of us stuck in an office?"

"I am a writer. I write books and articles about a particular topic, and I sell them to publishers"

I know, writers have been around for centuries, but meeting on in-person and hearing those words in person completely changed my view about work. Imagine when you see the original Monalisa. That thrill and excitement when you stand in front of it aren't the same as you see it on the Internet. The idea that I can sell my creativity to others and I get to choose when and where I work was pulling me away from my job little by little, every day from that moment. 

I eventually decided to quit my corporate job and leave everything behind to a place where my beloving blue ocean is at my doorsteps. 

What type of art do I produce?

When I was in art school, I spend most of the time doing the foundational exercises. I remember repeatedly drawing straight lines and circles for hours. I also spent lots of time learning the relations between lights and shadows. In my memories, learning art feels dry and boring. Entering middle school age, I study from a different teacher who taught me about different mediums. Eventually, in the summer of 1995, I installed Adobe Photoshop 3.0 on my computer, and that changed my world. I love how quickly I can color my works on a computer. I also love the power to print out copies of my work so more people can see and own a piece. 

Later I added a photo scanner and a color inkjet printer to my computer's entourage, and that again changed my world. They allow me to transform a hand-drawn artwork into a digital file, which I can color in Photoshop quickly, and then print out as many copies as however many people who a piece of it.  

My arts today are mostly done on a computer, but I still preserve the freehand style. After many years of drawing straight lines and circles, I finally understand one thing. Give a pencil to two artists and ask them to draw a straight line, the lines won't look the same. How an artist draws a line is as important as his/her signature. I draw on a computer/iPad, but I always use a digital pen for sketching and outlining. 

Since COVID19 broke out in Okinawa, with more time on hand, I also started making original artwork on canvas. Digital artworks are fast and low in production cost, and that is exactly why original artwork is valuable and full of personality. 

Check out my online shop and you will see a full collection of artworks and products I made. 


By becoming a patron, you'll instantly unlock access to 22 exclusive posts
32
Images
8
Links
6
Videos
By becoming a patron, you'll instantly unlock access to 22 exclusive posts
32
Images
8
Links
6
Videos

Recent posts by Desmond Liang

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