Emma Ridgway is creating illustrations and comics
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patron

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I studied illustration at University College Falmouth and my first published illustrations appeared in a free poster magazine in Amsterdam called Unfold



When the Van Gogh Museum commissioned Unfold to create a fold out poster magazine for their Picasso exhibition, Unfold invited me to design the poster. 



I moved to Norwich and struggled to find a new job in the recession. I started to draw a comic called Les Jardin (about a man who inherits his father's exotic plant collection) which interested some fellow artists and a publisher, but not having a job made drawing feel like the biggest indulgence in the world.



I had a few temp jobs, but they didn't work out.







I still kept drawing, and I sold a couple of paintings in local cafes, but not enough to survive on. 

Around that time, WeAdmire - a tshirt company based in Shoreditch - contacted me, asking about some portraits I'd recently made, including one of Nikola Tesla. 



Their ethos was to make tshirts celebrating things people admired. It was nice to think of people connecting with my work and wearing my drawings.



After that, I started "Portraits on Postcards" as a way of reconnecting with people. I've always felt that my best work was made with people in mind, so I put out an open invitation for people to commission a postcard sized portrait of a person they admired, which I would paint in watercolours and ink and post to them.



I made about 15 portraits in total, and scanned and printed them all, collecting them together as part of a zine designed to be shared. 



I had a few personal portrait commissions after that, from friends and from a couple of people in New York who contacted me out of the blue. I began to develop my portrait illustrations further and to feel more connected with people again.

WeAdmire then invited me to create a tshirt design for their pop-up shop collaboration with The Barbican, during the "baddest girl gangs" season of films.


My friend B offered me some freelance transcription work, and my friend J gave me a job proofreading. Then my friend L got in touch to see if I could make some portrait illustrations for her cousin's company magazine, The Journal. I felt so grateful to all my friends for their help when I was struggling.



Around that time, two of my record sleeve designs were also selected for inclusion in the Secret 7" exhibition at Somerset House, London. 






Then I had the opportunity to move to London and work full time as a transcriber. 

When I first moved to London, the lead designer at Smithsonian Magazine saw my portraits on postcards (somehow??) and commissioned me to illustrate a set of portraits for them. I worked on it every day after work. 



The art director at Gentleman's Journal saw my portrait illustrations for The Journal and commissioned me to illustrate for them.



In 2016 my illustrations for Smithsonian Magazine won in the editorial category of Communcation Arts Magazine's annual Illustration competition.

I recently left the transcription job and I now work full-time as an artist's assistant. I would love to be able to devote more time to making my own art.

Thank you!

 http://www.emma-ridgway.co.uk/

Rewards
Pledge $2 or more per month
0 patrons
Access to my Patreon-only posts, including comics and work-in-progress for magazine commissions.
Goals
$3 of $50 per month
At $50 I will make available a PDF collection of sketchbook pages, comics and drawings exclusively for my patrons to download. 
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I studied illustration at University College Falmouth and my first published illustrations appeared in a free poster magazine in Amsterdam called Unfold



When the Van Gogh Museum commissioned Unfold to create a fold out poster magazine for their Picasso exhibition, Unfold invited me to design the poster. 



I moved to Norwich and struggled to find a new job in the recession. I started to draw a comic called Les Jardin (about a man who inherits his father's exotic plant collection) which interested some fellow artists and a publisher, but not having a job made drawing feel like the biggest indulgence in the world.



I had a few temp jobs, but they didn't work out.







I still kept drawing, and I sold a couple of paintings in local cafes, but not enough to survive on. 

Around that time, WeAdmire - a tshirt company based in Shoreditch - contacted me, asking about some portraits I'd recently made, including one of Nikola Tesla. 



Their ethos was to make tshirts celebrating things people admired. It was nice to think of people connecting with my work and wearing my drawings.



After that, I started "Portraits on Postcards" as a way of reconnecting with people. I've always felt that my best work was made with people in mind, so I put out an open invitation for people to commission a postcard sized portrait of a person they admired, which I would paint in watercolours and ink and post to them.



I made about 15 portraits in total, and scanned and printed them all, collecting them together as part of a zine designed to be shared. 



I had a few personal portrait commissions after that, from friends and from a couple of people in New York who contacted me out of the blue. I began to develop my portrait illustrations further and to feel more connected with people again.

WeAdmire then invited me to create a tshirt design for their pop-up shop collaboration with The Barbican, during the "baddest girl gangs" season of films.


My friend B offered me some freelance transcription work, and my friend J gave me a job proofreading. Then my friend L got in touch to see if I could make some portrait illustrations for her cousin's company magazine, The Journal. I felt so grateful to all my friends for their help when I was struggling.



Around that time, two of my record sleeve designs were also selected for inclusion in the Secret 7" exhibition at Somerset House, London. 






Then I had the opportunity to move to London and work full time as a transcriber. 

When I first moved to London, the lead designer at Smithsonian Magazine saw my portraits on postcards (somehow??) and commissioned me to illustrate a set of portraits for them. I worked on it every day after work. 



The art director at Gentleman's Journal saw my portrait illustrations for The Journal and commissioned me to illustrate for them.



In 2016 my illustrations for Smithsonian Magazine won in the editorial category of Communcation Arts Magazine's annual Illustration competition.

I recently left the transcription job and I now work full-time as an artist's assistant. I would love to be able to devote more time to making my own art.

Thank you!

 http://www.emma-ridgway.co.uk/

Recent posts by Emma Ridgway

Rewards
Pledge $2 or more per month
0 patrons
Access to my Patreon-only posts, including comics and work-in-progress for magazine commissions.