Felli is creating Film and Alternative Photography
3

patrons

$22
per month
My name is Felicita "Felli" Maynard and I create artwork as a way to further understand myself, and help others understand themselves. I focus on themes revolving around the African diaspora, the Black body and issues concerning gender and sexuality. I am inspired by artists like African American photographer Carrie Mae Weems and South African photographer Zanele Muholi, who use Black bodies to challenge institutional stereotypes. Through straight photography my work brings to the forefront issues that are occurring within communities of color such as oppression and exploitation. I work across alternative photography processes (specifically wet and dry plate), digital art, altar work and an exploration of organic materials.

Wet Plate Photography or the Wet-collodion process, also called collodion process, early photographic technique invented by Englishman Frederick Scott Archer in 1851. The process involved adding a soluble iodide to a solution of collodion (cellulose nitrate) and coating a glass plate with the mixture. In the darkroom the plate was immersed in a solution of silver nitrate to form silver iodide. The plate, still wet, was exposed in the camera. It was then developed by pouring a solution of pyrogallic acid over it and was fixed with a strong solution of sodium thiosulfate, for which potassium cyanide was later substituted. Immediate developing and fixing were necessary because, after the collodion film had dried, it became waterproof and the reagent solutions could not penetrate it. The process was valued for the level of detail and clarity it allowed. A modification of the process, in which an underexposed negative was backed with black paper or velvet to form what was called an ambrotype, became very popular from the mid- to late 19th century, as did a version on black lacquered metal known as a tintype, or ferrotype. (Britannica) 


Currently I am interested in creating a positive imagery regarding how the Black body has been portrayed by methods of early photography, specifically wet plate photography. In doing so I want to change the narrative that has been put in place by early ethnographic and anthropometric images made of Black bodies by historical hierarchies. I have learned the process of making modern "tintypes" and ambrotypes through the Penumbra Foundation and have fallen in love with the medium at the same time.

I've always paid out of pocket for all my film cameras, film, lighting supplies, development, etc. I am now at a point where I can no longer afford it on my own. I believe I am destined to do this work and with your help I will be able to continue to learn and create.

I am creator and educator. Outside of art I am also the 1/3 of Support Black Art, which exists solely for the promotion and awareness of black artists worldwide. We engage our community via social media, art events, and social activism.

GOALS:
  • Support purchasing film photography supplies
  • Help me fund the materials needed to be a working wet plate photographer (including chemistry, plates, & dark boxes)
  • Ongoing support with the expansion of Support Black Art

Tiers
Level 1
$2 or more per month 0 patrons
For those who just want to Support my journey plus access to exclusive previews and work in progress projects.


Level 1.5
$5 or more per month 1 patron
 Access to patron-only exclusive content 
Level 2
$10 or more per month 2 patrons

  • Gift of Support Black Art memorabilia
  • Patron-only polls
  • Plus all previous rewards 
Level 3
$20 or more per month 0 patrons
  • Access to private videos showing my art process and events
  • Plus all previous rewards
Level 4
$40 or more per month 0 patrons
  • Bi-Yearly exclusive one of a kind Polaroid gift
  • Plus all previous rewards
Level 5
$60 or more per month 0 patrons
  • Name added to contributors section of website
  • Plus all previous rewards
Level 6
$100 or more per month 0 patrons
  •  A tier exclusive artwork by the artist
  •  Plus all previous rewards 
Goals
3 of 50 patrons
I'm working on setting up my chemistry for Wet Plate Photography and becoming a working wet plate photographer. With your contributions I can buy chemicals, aluminum plates, glass plates, trays, chemistry storage, etc.
Thank you for helping to make my dream come true.
1 of 1
My name is Felicita "Felli" Maynard and I create artwork as a way to further understand myself, and help others understand themselves. I focus on themes revolving around the African diaspora, the Black body and issues concerning gender and sexuality. I am inspired by artists like African American photographer Carrie Mae Weems and South African photographer Zanele Muholi, who use Black bodies to challenge institutional stereotypes. Through straight photography my work brings to the forefront issues that are occurring within communities of color such as oppression and exploitation. I work across alternative photography processes (specifically wet and dry plate), digital art, altar work and an exploration of organic materials.

Wet Plate Photography or the Wet-collodion process, also called collodion process, early photographic technique invented by Englishman Frederick Scott Archer in 1851. The process involved adding a soluble iodide to a solution of collodion (cellulose nitrate) and coating a glass plate with the mixture. In the darkroom the plate was immersed in a solution of silver nitrate to form silver iodide. The plate, still wet, was exposed in the camera. It was then developed by pouring a solution of pyrogallic acid over it and was fixed with a strong solution of sodium thiosulfate, for which potassium cyanide was later substituted. Immediate developing and fixing were necessary because, after the collodion film had dried, it became waterproof and the reagent solutions could not penetrate it. The process was valued for the level of detail and clarity it allowed. A modification of the process, in which an underexposed negative was backed with black paper or velvet to form what was called an ambrotype, became very popular from the mid- to late 19th century, as did a version on black lacquered metal known as a tintype, or ferrotype. (Britannica) 


Currently I am interested in creating a positive imagery regarding how the Black body has been portrayed by methods of early photography, specifically wet plate photography. In doing so I want to change the narrative that has been put in place by early ethnographic and anthropometric images made of Black bodies by historical hierarchies. I have learned the process of making modern "tintypes" and ambrotypes through the Penumbra Foundation and have fallen in love with the medium at the same time.

I've always paid out of pocket for all my film cameras, film, lighting supplies, development, etc. I am now at a point where I can no longer afford it on my own. I believe I am destined to do this work and with your help I will be able to continue to learn and create.

I am creator and educator. Outside of art I am also the 1/3 of Support Black Art, which exists solely for the promotion and awareness of black artists worldwide. We engage our community via social media, art events, and social activism.

GOALS:
  • Support purchasing film photography supplies
  • Help me fund the materials needed to be a working wet plate photographer (including chemistry, plates, & dark boxes)
  • Ongoing support with the expansion of Support Black Art

Recent posts by Felli

Tiers
Level 1
$2 or more per month 0 patrons
For those who just want to Support my journey plus access to exclusive previews and work in progress projects.


Level 1.5
$5 or more per month 1 patron
 Access to patron-only exclusive content 
Level 2
$10 or more per month 2 patrons

  • Gift of Support Black Art memorabilia
  • Patron-only polls
  • Plus all previous rewards 
Level 3
$20 or more per month 0 patrons
  • Access to private videos showing my art process and events
  • Plus all previous rewards
Level 4
$40 or more per month 0 patrons
  • Bi-Yearly exclusive one of a kind Polaroid gift
  • Plus all previous rewards
Level 5
$60 or more per month 0 patrons
  • Name added to contributors section of website
  • Plus all previous rewards
Level 6
$100 or more per month 0 patrons
  •  A tier exclusive artwork by the artist
  •  Plus all previous rewards