Finding Ada

is creating resources for women in STEM

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Supporter

$4.50
per month
You love Ada Lovelace Day and the work we do year round and just want to help keep us going. You'll see our public posts and earn our undying gratitude for your generosity.

Articles and book chapters

$7.50
per month
You'll get access to regular articles from the Finding Ada Network as well as chapters from our two Passion for Science books. 

Video talks and workshops

$14.50
per month
Catch up on all the video content from the Finding Ada Conference, plus all the video content we record in future. You'll also get access to all our articles and book chapters. 

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About Finding Ada

At FindingAda.com, we run three projects for girls and women in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM): 

  • Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of the achievements of women in STEM.
  • The Finding Ada Network, an online mentorship and knowledge sharing network for women in STEM
  • The Finding Ada Conference, on online conference for women in STEM and advocates for gender equality.

Ada Lovelace Day
Ada Lovelace Day
is a global celebration of the achievements of women in STEM. We aim to increase the profile of women in STEM and, in doing so, create new role models to encourage girls and women to study STEM and support them in their careers. Each year on the second Tuesday of October, we host a flagship 'science cabaret' event in London – you can watch all of our talks on YouTube – whilst around the world independent groups put on their own events.

The Finding Ada Network
The Finding Ada Network is an online mentoring and knowledge sharing network for women and advocates for gender equality in STEM. We provide subscribers with access to a world class online peer-to-peer mentorship platform, alongside exclusive content covering careers advice, personal and professional development, plus HR policy and advocacy advice.

Our aim is to make high quality mentorship available to women in STEM regardless of where they work, whether they are at an SME, a large corporate, in academia, working full time or part time, or even if they are not currently in the workforce.

The Finding Ada Conference
The Finding Ada Conference is a fully online global conference for women in STEM and advocates for gender equality. The first was held in November 2020, beginning at 9am on 10 November in Wellington, New Zealand, and ending 29 hours later at 5pm on the West Coast of America. 

Our headlines speakers were Caroline Walker from J.P. Morgan, DeLisa Alexander from Red Hat and Chi Onwurah MP. We had panel discussions on panel discussions indigenous women in STEM, using children’s books to encourage girls into STEM, mitigating the impacts of COVID-19 on women’s careers, and launching and running an advocacy group. Plus there were over 30 other speakers from around the globe providing pre-recorded talks and live Q&As. 

You’re supporting even more than that

By donating to us here on Patreon, you are also funding our other activities, including: 

  • All the behind-the-scenes work that goes into producing Ada Lovelace Day Live each year
  • Talks about women in STEM and Ada Lovelace, which Suw gives to schools and at public events for free throughout the year
  • Giving help and advice to grassroots events organisers
  • Giving interviews and information about both Ada Lovelace and the Day to TV, radio and print journalists and researchers

The more support we get, the more help we can provide women in STEM. So the more you give, the more we can do!

If you want to learn more about what we do, then take a look at our End of Year Reports!

Who was Ada Lovelace?

Ada Lovelace was the world's  first computer programmer, writing and publishing a program to calculate Bernoulli numbers for Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine, a mechanical computer that was never built. 

In 1842 Lovelace translated a short article describing the Analytical Engine by the Italian mathematician Luigi Menabrea, for publication in England. Babbage asked her to expand the article, “as she understood the machine so well”. The final article is over three times the length of the original and contains several early ‘computer programs,’ as well as strikingly prescient observations on the potential uses of the machine, including the manipulation of symbols and creation of music.

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