Hansha Teki is creating philopoetic space
6

patrons

Haere mai e te whanau
tena koutou katoa
a kia noho te Ariki ki a koutou


In the language and the spirit of my homeland, Aotearoa / New Zealand, I welcome you and wish you the best of all good things. 

Concurrent with my rediscovery of a decades-long dormant ability to write, the efficacy of my breathing has lessened in inverse proportion pointing to poems that would not strain the viability of my breathing ability. With the happy conjunction of these discoveries, I began writing short form poetry that has some of its origins in the Japanese haikai tradition. I am learning creative techniques from within that tradition and also in its adoption/adaptation by English Language haiku poets.

To make such short poems is like being the midwife of language—language in the process of being born while still tied to and being nourished by the silence of its origin. Haiku opens up a gap for presence to be simultaneously present and absent. That which exists only in silence is given form and utterance that is akin to the vocalisations of "Mitochondrial Eve" or the vocalisations of a human infant moving towards communication.

Haiku celebrates the existence of mystery with very few words that evoke rather than explain that which lies forever in mystery.

You are welcome to participate in the unfolding of my efforts.

Tiers
Moral Support
$1 or more per month
early access to new posts

Haere mai e te whanau
tena koutou katoa
a kia noho te Ariki ki a koutou


In the language and the spirit of my homeland, Aotearoa / New Zealand, I welcome you and wish you the best of all good things. 

Concurrent with my rediscovery of a decades-long dormant ability to write, the efficacy of my breathing has lessened in inverse proportion pointing to poems that would not strain the viability of my breathing ability. With the happy conjunction of these discoveries, I began writing short form poetry that has some of its origins in the Japanese haikai tradition. I am learning creative techniques from within that tradition and also in its adoption/adaptation by English Language haiku poets.

To make such short poems is like being the midwife of language—language in the process of being born while still tied to and being nourished by the silence of its origin. Haiku opens up a gap for presence to be simultaneously present and absent. That which exists only in silence is given form and utterance that is akin to the vocalisations of "Mitochondrial Eve" or the vocalisations of a human infant moving towards communication.

Haiku celebrates the existence of mystery with very few words that evoke rather than explain that which lies forever in mystery.

You are welcome to participate in the unfolding of my efforts.

Recent posts by Hansha Teki

Tiers
Moral Support
$1 or more per month
early access to new posts