Heather Heying

is creating content on evolution, and that which it has wrought.

Select a membership level

DarkHorse Membership

reward item
reward item
$5
per month
  • Support DarkHorse Livestreams!
  • Get exclusive access to a ~1-2 hour livestream on the last Sunday of every month (11am Pacific) with Bret Weinstein and me, which will remain posted (but private) for those who miss it when it's live. 
  • Access to the private, invite-only Dark Horse Discord.

Pose A Question

reward item
reward item
$11
per month
Benefits of DarkHorse Members, plus
  • During the exclusive livestreams at 11am Pacific on the last Sunday of each month, we will answer 10 - 20 questions which have been solicited from $11+ patrons, and vetted.

This'll keep you busy

reward item
reward item
$17
per month
But wait, there's more!
  • All rewards for lower tiers, plus: 
  • a recommended reading list (starting small, with sporadic updates and expansions over time), and 
  • a pdf of my 2002 book, Antipode.

988

patrons

About Heather Heying

Thank you for joining me. If you are here, I am grateful. I hope that you will find things here to challenge you, illuminate your world, make you laugh, fill you with wonder.

As of June 2020, Bret Weinstein and I are using this Patreon, in part, to build subscribers to our Dark Horse Livestreams, which we began on his YouTube channel in March 2020. We are both evolutionary biologists, and also married to one another, who are talking about how we understand the world, through an evolutionary lens.

The livestreams began as the SARS-CoV2 pandemic prompted lockdowns across the world, and we assessed the virus, and its societal impacts, for many episodes. Then we pivoted, as protests, and then riots, became common on the streets of America in the wake of the killing of George Floyd by a policeman in Minneapolis. What else will we speak to, as the world continues to change?

In evolution space, the questions often begin with “why.” Why are so many birds monogamous? Why does infanticide persist in lions and langur monkeys? Why do we have a dominant hand (foot, eye, ear), and why are 10% of people lefties (like me)?

I am also fascinated by the evolution of jaws and flight and language; and have spent much of my life as a scientist thinking about sexual selection and the evolution of mating systems and territoriality and parental care; and about the crazy chromosomal arrangements of frogs, and how songbirds learn to sing, and what dolphins, elephants, crows, parrots and apes have in common.

In the somewhat narrower domain of human sex and gender, some questions I’m interested in include: Which differences between men and women are immutable, and which aren’t? What do lipstick and fast cars have in common? What if the most critical gender gap is one of confidence? Why is “believe all women” bad policy, and bad for women, men, and society? How can women navigate the distinction between hotness and beauty? We hear a lot about toxic masculinity—what about toxic femininity?

I taught undergraduates for 15 years, and didn't think, before then, that I would ever think of myself as an educator. But I came to love teaching, and I have a lot of thoughts about education, too. Some of those are focused on the intolerance and anti-Enlightenment ideology that is taking over universities, and spreading outwards to places like google (also: this). Many of you already know what happened at Evergreen, and while I’d rather that story not be primary in what happens next, if you don’t know it and you want to, you can start here.

Nature may be a theme here as well, especially tropical nature, especially the jungle. Also: the value of doing things with your hands, and your body and, not unrelated, about risk and adventure (here is my New York Times op-ed on this topic, here is my story of the boat accident in Galápagos in which I nearly died, and here is an essay, related but not at all the same, exploring the nature of memory, as told through the story of being mugged at knifepoint in Quito). I may write about food, and play, and childhood, and music—in every case, with an evolutionary lens. I also care about numeracy, which isn’t considered as important as literacy, but should be. I may write about math, a little, probably basic statistics, and if you’re a math-phobe, you should stick around for that, because math is fun, and powerful. And did I mention fun?

I also write fiction. Science fiction, mostly, and no, none of it is out there in the universe, yet, and I don’t know if I will post any here, but I might.

So this is kind of a black box yet, but a fun one, and, at least when I’m doing non-fiction, we’ll minimize assumptions and try to figure out what’s what as much as possible.

Finally, go to my personal website to find more of my writings, interviews, and talks.
By becoming a patron, you'll instantly unlock access to 87 exclusive posts
86
Images
10
Links
13
Polls
51
Writings
By becoming a patron, you'll instantly unlock access to 87 exclusive posts
86
Images
10
Links
13
Polls
51
Writings

Recent posts by Heather Heying

How it works

Get started in 2 minutes

Choose a membership
Sign up
Add a payment method
Get benefits