Isaac Meyer is creating The History of Japan Podcast
89

patrons

$141
per Per weekly episode
Hello, my name is Isaac Meyer, and I’m a former PhD student in History at the University of Washington in Seattle. I’m also the showrunner for the History of Japan podcast, weekly show that runs, on average, about 20-30 minutes per episode. We cover a huge variety of topics, from the power politics of the ancient Imperial Court to the legacy and impact of Japan’s video game industry.

Why Did I Start the Podcast?
First, I think Japanese history specifically is extremely important and hugely under-served by what’s out there in English. Japan is one of the most important states in the modern world; it’s hugely wealthy, hugely influential, and its relationship with China and the United States is likely to be one of the driving forces of the 21st century. That’s not even touching on its cultural influence in things like the manga industry or anime. For all that, however, there’s not a lot of great material available to the general public on Japan or Japanese history; most of what’s out there is either very general or relies on the reader having some degree of prior knowledge. My hope is to make Japan’s history accessible to everyone.
Second, history as an academic discipline in general serves the majority of interested amateurs out there very poorly. Most academic history – though certainly not all of it – is written in such a way as to make it either very boring or just too jargon-laden to be comprehensible for anyone who doesn’t have years of training sifting through this kind of stuff. I firmly believe that history is both interesting and worthwhile for everyone to know, and the podcast is one of the ways I want to prove that. I try to make every show interesting, and I try to also make it clear for each topic why this is worth knowing, and what value it has for us as citizens of the modern world.

Why support the show?
Well, hopefully because you like it! I strive to make the show both educational and entertaining for everyone who listens to it, and if you enjoy it please do consider donating. While I try to keep costs related to the show to a minimum they do exist – in terms of hosting fees, book purchases or rentals, and simple man-hours – and your help defraying those costs would mean a lot.
Beyond that, you’ll also be helping to support the idea that history is for everyone, not just those with the training to decipher it. I firmly believe that history belongs to us all, and that historians have a public duty to share their knowledge with the world in a format that is accessible to the general public. This is history presented without jargon and without the assumption that listeners need to have years of expensive education before they can be introduced to tough subjects – all you need is interest and a willingness to learn. If you agree, I hope you’ll consider supporting the show.
Your support will also help me get through my graduate education. As some of you already know, graduate education in general and the liberal arts in particular are hugely underfunded in the United States; in part, this is our own fault for making our subjects so opaque that no one outside the academy can see their value, but it’s also part of a massive shift in the way we fund and think about education in the United States. It’s my hope that as a historian I can use my degree and my training to help people see the value in history and why it’s so important to keep our discipline alive. I don’t receive any assistance for the show from my university, financial or otherwise; this whole project is supported by my own time and funds.

Why Patreon?
There are three reasons I chose Patreon over other potential donation options (for example, PayPal). First, Patreon's got a nice, clean, and easy to use interface, making it easier on users (at least in my opinion). Second, Patreon allows for recurring donations -- you can pledge a certain amount per show, making it better for long-form projects like a podcast. Third, Patreon does better by creators like me; I see more of the money than I would through PayPal. In addition, PayPal has some very restrictive policies that make it easy for them to freeze your account and deny you funding.

Thanks for reading, and for all your support. The reaction to the podcast over the last year and a half has been absolutely incredible and far beyond anything I ever expected; the tremendous outpouring of interest and enthusiasm that has come my way has meant so much, and I can’t really say enough how much I appreciate it. So, thanks very much to each and every one of you for listening, and I’m excited to learn with you where the show will go from here!
Hello, my name is Isaac Meyer, and I’m a former PhD student in History at the University of Washington in Seattle. I’m also the showrunner for the History of Japan podcast, weekly show that runs, on average, about 20-30 minutes per episode. We cover a huge variety of topics, from the power politics of the ancient Imperial Court to the legacy and impact of Japan’s video game industry.

Why Did I Start the Podcast?
First, I think Japanese history specifically is extremely important and hugely under-served by what’s out there in English. Japan is one of the most important states in the modern world; it’s hugely wealthy, hugely influential, and its relationship with China and the United States is likely to be one of the driving forces of the 21st century. That’s not even touching on its cultural influence in things like the manga industry or anime. For all that, however, there’s not a lot of great material available to the general public on Japan or Japanese history; most of what’s out there is either very general or relies on the reader having some degree of prior knowledge. My hope is to make Japan’s history accessible to everyone.
Second, history as an academic discipline in general serves the majority of interested amateurs out there very poorly. Most academic history – though certainly not all of it – is written in such a way as to make it either very boring or just too jargon-laden to be comprehensible for anyone who doesn’t have years of training sifting through this kind of stuff. I firmly believe that history is both interesting and worthwhile for everyone to know, and the podcast is one of the ways I want to prove that. I try to make every show interesting, and I try to also make it clear for each topic why this is worth knowing, and what value it has for us as citizens of the modern world.

Why support the show?
Well, hopefully because you like it! I strive to make the show both educational and entertaining for everyone who listens to it, and if you enjoy it please do consider donating. While I try to keep costs related to the show to a minimum they do exist – in terms of hosting fees, book purchases or rentals, and simple man-hours – and your help defraying those costs would mean a lot.
Beyond that, you’ll also be helping to support the idea that history is for everyone, not just those with the training to decipher it. I firmly believe that history belongs to us all, and that historians have a public duty to share their knowledge with the world in a format that is accessible to the general public. This is history presented without jargon and without the assumption that listeners need to have years of expensive education before they can be introduced to tough subjects – all you need is interest and a willingness to learn. If you agree, I hope you’ll consider supporting the show.
Your support will also help me get through my graduate education. As some of you already know, graduate education in general and the liberal arts in particular are hugely underfunded in the United States; in part, this is our own fault for making our subjects so opaque that no one outside the academy can see their value, but it’s also part of a massive shift in the way we fund and think about education in the United States. It’s my hope that as a historian I can use my degree and my training to help people see the value in history and why it’s so important to keep our discipline alive. I don’t receive any assistance for the show from my university, financial or otherwise; this whole project is supported by my own time and funds.

Why Patreon?
There are three reasons I chose Patreon over other potential donation options (for example, PayPal). First, Patreon's got a nice, clean, and easy to use interface, making it easier on users (at least in my opinion). Second, Patreon allows for recurring donations -- you can pledge a certain amount per show, making it better for long-form projects like a podcast. Third, Patreon does better by creators like me; I see more of the money than I would through PayPal. In addition, PayPal has some very restrictive policies that make it easy for them to freeze your account and deny you funding.

Thanks for reading, and for all your support. The reaction to the podcast over the last year and a half has been absolutely incredible and far beyond anything I ever expected; the tremendous outpouring of interest and enthusiasm that has come my way has meant so much, and I can’t really say enough how much I appreciate it. So, thanks very much to each and every one of you for listening, and I’m excited to learn with you where the show will go from here!

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