Joe Roots is creating Paintings, Combine Paintings / Readymades and Murals
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I'm classical, modern and contemporary. My job roughly consists of merging these 3 paradigms into the next new thing. I was born in 1990 and I was raised traditionally, on what came to be called an "organic" farm. That is to say, I grew up in a very classical environment.. Because of my countryside perspective, I often notice things that people don't. Let's say that I love to talk about the elephant in the room. In the last ten years, I have lived in Quebec City, Vancouver, and I am currently based in Montreal. However, I wonder if I will ever get used to urban life... I do not paint on canvas anymore; I only paint on what is rendered prematurably obsolete, useless and worthless.I am fascinated with what citizens throw away. I roam the streets looking for "useless" and "worthless" stuff, so as to use them as canvases. I think this how we are going to change the world: by seeing value where other people find none.I am greatly influenced by the work of Marcel Duchamp, even though unlike him, I do grant tremendous importance to the aesthetic aspect of my work. I choose objects in a very similar manner to him. In short, I look for objects that are commonly perceived as worthless, then I paint on them some surrealistic imagery that conveys meaning. Moreover, my practice is also very similar to Robert Rauchenberg's combine paintings, but unlike him I do not put random objects on the canvas: I rather use the object as a canvas. There are endless associations and analogies that emerge when you put an image on an object. I painted an oriental rat flea on a king-sized mattress; I painted the last meal on a bag of chips; I painted a parody of a milk advertisement on a broken flat screen, I painted a dinosaur on an unrepairable laptop; etc. I do this so as to provides us with a lot of questions. The goal is to stimulate a deeper reflexion in the mind of the viewer, and this is my way of stealthily pointing at various elephants living in what we call reality. I find a lot of joy in exhibiting those things. The things that we have come to forget; that we have taken for granted, that have become invisible to us, or simply the things that we refuse to see.
I am greatly influenced by the work of Marcel Duchamp, even though unlike him, I do grant tremendous importance to the aesthetic aspect of my work. I choose objects in a very similar manner to him. In short, I look for objects that are commonly perceived as unvaluable, then I paint on them some meaningful and visually attractive, either realistic or surrealistic imagery. Recently, I have come to realize that I must have been influenced by the work of Robert Rauschenberg as well, as both our practices are a combination of painting and sculpture. 

What excites me the most is wondering about what I am going to paint on a given object, and what associations would be interesting to make with it. For example, I painted an oriental rat flea on a king-sized mattress; I painted the last meal on a bag of chips; I painted a parody of a milk advertisement on a broken flat screen, I painted a dinosaur on an unrepairable laptop; etc. I do this so as to provides us with a lot of questions. The goal is to stimulate a deeper reflexion in the mind of the viewer, and this is my way of stealthily pointing at various elephants living in what we call reality. I find a lot of joy in exhibiting the things that we have come to forget; that we have taken for granted, that have become invisible to us or simply the things that we refuse to see. 
Goals
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My goal is to influence the course of history.
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I'm classical, modern and contemporary. My job roughly consists of merging these 3 paradigms into the next new thing. I was born in 1990 and I was raised traditionally, on what came to be called an "organic" farm. That is to say, I grew up in a very classical environment.. Because of my countryside perspective, I often notice things that people don't. Let's say that I love to talk about the elephant in the room. In the last ten years, I have lived in Quebec City, Vancouver, and I am currently based in Montreal. However, I wonder if I will ever get used to urban life... I do not paint on canvas anymore; I only paint on what is rendered prematurably obsolete, useless and worthless.I am fascinated with what citizens throw away. I roam the streets looking for "useless" and "worthless" stuff, so as to use them as canvases. I think this how we are going to change the world: by seeing value where other people find none.I am greatly influenced by the work of Marcel Duchamp, even though unlike him, I do grant tremendous importance to the aesthetic aspect of my work. I choose objects in a very similar manner to him. In short, I look for objects that are commonly perceived as worthless, then I paint on them some surrealistic imagery that conveys meaning. Moreover, my practice is also very similar to Robert Rauchenberg's combine paintings, but unlike him I do not put random objects on the canvas: I rather use the object as a canvas. There are endless associations and analogies that emerge when you put an image on an object. I painted an oriental rat flea on a king-sized mattress; I painted the last meal on a bag of chips; I painted a parody of a milk advertisement on a broken flat screen, I painted a dinosaur on an unrepairable laptop; etc. I do this so as to provides us with a lot of questions. The goal is to stimulate a deeper reflexion in the mind of the viewer, and this is my way of stealthily pointing at various elephants living in what we call reality. I find a lot of joy in exhibiting those things. The things that we have come to forget; that we have taken for granted, that have become invisible to us, or simply the things that we refuse to see.
I am greatly influenced by the work of Marcel Duchamp, even though unlike him, I do grant tremendous importance to the aesthetic aspect of my work. I choose objects in a very similar manner to him. In short, I look for objects that are commonly perceived as unvaluable, then I paint on them some meaningful and visually attractive, either realistic or surrealistic imagery. Recently, I have come to realize that I must have been influenced by the work of Robert Rauschenberg as well, as both our practices are a combination of painting and sculpture. 

What excites me the most is wondering about what I am going to paint on a given object, and what associations would be interesting to make with it. For example, I painted an oriental rat flea on a king-sized mattress; I painted the last meal on a bag of chips; I painted a parody of a milk advertisement on a broken flat screen, I painted a dinosaur on an unrepairable laptop; etc. I do this so as to provides us with a lot of questions. The goal is to stimulate a deeper reflexion in the mind of the viewer, and this is my way of stealthily pointing at various elephants living in what we call reality. I find a lot of joy in exhibiting the things that we have come to forget; that we have taken for granted, that have become invisible to us or simply the things that we refuse to see. 

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