Kyrgyz Space Program is creating the first Kyrgyz satellite, built by girls
103

patrons

$811
per month
We are running a school of satellite-building for girls from Kyrgyzstan, a country in Central Asia.

Wait! What?

Yes. A group of girls from Kyrgyzstan has gathered to build a CubeSat, a miniature satellite that will then be sent to the orbit.


March 5, 2018, Day 1 of the school.

But why?

Because we are tired of discrimination against women in Kyrgyzstan. This way we want to prove to the whole world that girls can create anything they want. This might sound obvious to you, but unfortunately there are still too many people who don't believe this.

Is it so easy to build and send a satellite to space?

It is not that easy, but it is also not as difficult as many people might imagine. In fact, CubeSat is the most popular class of satellites among amateur space explorers. The cost of its production can be as low as $100,000 (this is really low for a satellite!), and at the same time it does really count as a satellite!

If we build this satellite, it is going to be the first satellite produced in Kyrgyzstan. Isn't it cool that it will be designed and built by girls?



What will the satellite actually do?

We have a couple of ideas, but we think it would be better if girls decide the satellite's purpose by themselves.

It should not be something too complicated, we don't want the first satellite to be super-expensive. This experience will allow us to understand how to build and send satellites in general. The second one can then be larger and more complicated.

Who are 'we' you are always referring to?

We are Kloop Media Foundation, the organization based in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. We are most famous for the media outlet that we've been running since 2007: it is called Kloop, and most of its authors are young people aged 14 to 25. They cover politics, investigate corruption, and report on human rights violations.

Despite the young age of its authors, Kloop has become one of the leading online media in Kyrgyzstan, and was even featured at TED.

Kloop Media has been running its own journalism school since the year of establishment. We have always been proud that our students have equal access to knowledge, no matter what their gender is. This is how we brought up the whole generation of female investigative journalists, editors, video engineers, camera operators, and sports reporters.

Listen to the TEDx talk of Anna Lelik, one of the most famous alumni, reporters, and editors in Kloop's history:



But what journalism has to do with space exploration?

We decided to reach new heights, and in 2016 Kloop Media launched new courses on programming and robotics.

Unfortunately, robotics course was mostly attended by boys. This is when we decided that we should launch a STEM course aimed specifically at girls.

The same year Bektour Iskender, one of Kloop founders, met Alex MacDonald from NASA at TED Summit. Alex travels around the world inspiring people to launch local space programs. After hearing what Kloop Media does, he proposed the idea of setting up Kyrgyz Space Program, saying that launching satellites has become "as cheap as never before".

We at Kloop Media then decided to combine two ideas (STEM for girls + satellite), and that's how the satellite-building school for girls was born.

When does the school start and how long will it last?

The school started on March 5, 2018. It will last until the moment the satellite is sent to the space. We hope that it won't take more than two years, but with satellite-building it is pretty unpredictable.

Who will train?

At the first stage, it will be Kloop's own team of trainers, led by co-founder Rinat Tuhvatshin. Kloop has been famous in Kyrgyzstan for introducing technical innovations into journalism. For example, in 2012 the team led by Rinat built Kloop's first drone by themselves (because drones were not sold in the country back then). That drone flew several times and shot 15 minutes of footage.

Since 2014, Kloop has been experimenting with cheapest possible technologies for live video broadcasting, and that turned us into the leading media outlet in Kyrgyzstan in terms of the quality (and quantity) of online live video coverage.

At the second stage of the satellite-building school we will invite our friends from the Lithuanian company NanoAvionics. It will happen if we manage to reach $2500-a-month funding. NanoAvionics are famous for launching the first Lithuanian satellite, which was also a CubeSat, so their knowledge will be the most useful we can imagine.

All illustrations used for this campaign are by Tatyana Zelenskaya
Rewards
Valentina
$2 or more per month 16 patrons
As Valentina Tereshkova's flight was important to inspire women to explore space, this smallest donation is fundamental for the Kyrgyz Space Program to become a reality. As a reward, you'll be able to tell your grandchildren that you helped a truly historic event to happen!
Special reward against hate speech online
$3.33 or more per month 9 of 100 patrons
This reward was created as a response to the growing hate speech online that our girls started facing since we announced the project.


Please use it if you read Bektour Iskender's post on Facebook. If you don't understand Russian, we will publish the English language version later.

Svetlana
$4 or more per month 18 patrons
Svetlana Savitskaya was the second woman in space. After her flight in 1982, sending women to space has become much more regular than before! Be like Svetlana! As a reward, you'll be subscribed to our exclusive patron-only posts that will notify you about the latest developments of the Kyrgyz Space Program.
Sally
$8 or more per month 37 patrons
Sally Ride was the first American female astronaut. As a reward for a $8-a-month donation, your name will be listed on the website of the Kyrgyz Space Program.
Kathryn
$16 or more per month 12 patrons
Named after Kathryn Sullivan, the first woman to perform a spacewalk, this donation will be rewarded by a postcard from Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, signed by girls who will work on a satellite!
Anna
$32 or more per month 4 of 20 patrons
Anna Lee Fisher was the first mother to fly to space. We encourage mothers to join our program too! With this donation you'll get access to a once-in-three-months video chat with girls who build the satellite. We have to limit this type of a donation, because we won't handle a video chat with more than 20 people at the same time. :(
Mae
$64 or more per month 1 patron
Mae Jameson was the first African-American female astronaut. Yay! This donation is dedicated to all the people of colour who devoted their lives to space exploration. By subscribing to it, you will get an unusual reward -- three free online lessons on the history of Kyrgyzstan, the country you most likely heard little about.
Chiaki
$128 or more per month 0 patrons
Chiaki Mukai was the first Asian female astronaut. Moreover, she had TWO Shuttle flights, how cool was she! Those who donate us $128-a-month will get a t-shirt with illustrations dedicated to the Kyrgyz Space Program. One of these artworks (created by a talented Kyrgyz artist Tatyana Zelenskaya) you can see as the cover of this fundraising campaign.
Eileen
$256 or more per month 0 of 20 patrons
Named after Eileen Collins, the first female Shuttle commander, this donation is rewarded by having your name engraved on a metal plaque and put in a room where the satellite will be designed and built. Unfortunately, we have to limit the number of these rewards, because we don't have enough space for more than 20 plaques.
Anousheh
$512 or more per month 0 patrons
Anousheh Ansari was the first Muslim female astronaut. This means a lot for Kyrgyzstan, where most of the population are Muslims. It is easy to become Islamophobic when right-wing politicians are getting more and more power in the West. This donation will give you a special reward: one-to-one conversation with Muslim feminists or Muslim LGBTQ-activists about how diverse Islam can be! Very refreshing and cliche-breaking!
Peggy
$1,024 or more per month 0 of 10 patrons
Peggy Whitson holds the record for the most time in space among female astronauts. She spent astonishing 665 days cruising around our planet, mostly on the International Space Station. To commemorate her achievement, we are introducing this generous donation option. And there will be a generous reward: your name will be engraved on the cubesat itself (but with very-very small letters, unfortunately, because the satellite is so small).
Goals
$811 of $10,000 per month
This is the ultimate goal. Having $10,000 a month will allow us to build a satellite, to ship it to the International Space Station, and have it launched onto the orbit.
5 of 5
We are running a school of satellite-building for girls from Kyrgyzstan, a country in Central Asia.

Wait! What?

Yes. A group of girls from Kyrgyzstan has gathered to build a CubeSat, a miniature satellite that will then be sent to the orbit.


March 5, 2018, Day 1 of the school.

But why?

Because we are tired of discrimination against women in Kyrgyzstan. This way we want to prove to the whole world that girls can create anything they want. This might sound obvious to you, but unfortunately there are still too many people who don't believe this.

Is it so easy to build and send a satellite to space?

It is not that easy, but it is also not as difficult as many people might imagine. In fact, CubeSat is the most popular class of satellites among amateur space explorers. The cost of its production can be as low as $100,000 (this is really low for a satellite!), and at the same time it does really count as a satellite!

If we build this satellite, it is going to be the first satellite produced in Kyrgyzstan. Isn't it cool that it will be designed and built by girls?



What will the satellite actually do?

We have a couple of ideas, but we think it would be better if girls decide the satellite's purpose by themselves.

It should not be something too complicated, we don't want the first satellite to be super-expensive. This experience will allow us to understand how to build and send satellites in general. The second one can then be larger and more complicated.

Who are 'we' you are always referring to?

We are Kloop Media Foundation, the organization based in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. We are most famous for the media outlet that we've been running since 2007: it is called Kloop, and most of its authors are young people aged 14 to 25. They cover politics, investigate corruption, and report on human rights violations.

Despite the young age of its authors, Kloop has become one of the leading online media in Kyrgyzstan, and was even featured at TED.

Kloop Media has been running its own journalism school since the year of establishment. We have always been proud that our students have equal access to knowledge, no matter what their gender is. This is how we brought up the whole generation of female investigative journalists, editors, video engineers, camera operators, and sports reporters.

Listen to the TEDx talk of Anna Lelik, one of the most famous alumni, reporters, and editors in Kloop's history:



But what journalism has to do with space exploration?

We decided to reach new heights, and in 2016 Kloop Media launched new courses on programming and robotics.

Unfortunately, robotics course was mostly attended by boys. This is when we decided that we should launch a STEM course aimed specifically at girls.

The same year Bektour Iskender, one of Kloop founders, met Alex MacDonald from NASA at TED Summit. Alex travels around the world inspiring people to launch local space programs. After hearing what Kloop Media does, he proposed the idea of setting up Kyrgyz Space Program, saying that launching satellites has become "as cheap as never before".

We at Kloop Media then decided to combine two ideas (STEM for girls + satellite), and that's how the satellite-building school for girls was born.

When does the school start and how long will it last?

The school started on March 5, 2018. It will last until the moment the satellite is sent to the space. We hope that it won't take more than two years, but with satellite-building it is pretty unpredictable.

Who will train?

At the first stage, it will be Kloop's own team of trainers, led by co-founder Rinat Tuhvatshin. Kloop has been famous in Kyrgyzstan for introducing technical innovations into journalism. For example, in 2012 the team led by Rinat built Kloop's first drone by themselves (because drones were not sold in the country back then). That drone flew several times and shot 15 minutes of footage.

Since 2014, Kloop has been experimenting with cheapest possible technologies for live video broadcasting, and that turned us into the leading media outlet in Kyrgyzstan in terms of the quality (and quantity) of online live video coverage.

At the second stage of the satellite-building school we will invite our friends from the Lithuanian company NanoAvionics. It will happen if we manage to reach $2500-a-month funding. NanoAvionics are famous for launching the first Lithuanian satellite, which was also a CubeSat, so their knowledge will be the most useful we can imagine.

All illustrations used for this campaign are by Tatyana Zelenskaya

Recent posts by Kyrgyz Space Program

Rewards
Valentina
$2 or more per month 16 patrons
As Valentina Tereshkova's flight was important to inspire women to explore space, this smallest donation is fundamental for the Kyrgyz Space Program to become a reality. As a reward, you'll be able to tell your grandchildren that you helped a truly historic event to happen!
Special reward against hate speech online
$3.33 or more per month 9 of 100 patrons
This reward was created as a response to the growing hate speech online that our girls started facing since we announced the project.


Please use it if you read Bektour Iskender's post on Facebook. If you don't understand Russian, we will publish the English language version later.

Svetlana
$4 or more per month 18 patrons
Svetlana Savitskaya was the second woman in space. After her flight in 1982, sending women to space has become much more regular than before! Be like Svetlana! As a reward, you'll be subscribed to our exclusive patron-only posts that will notify you about the latest developments of the Kyrgyz Space Program.
Sally
$8 or more per month 37 patrons
Sally Ride was the first American female astronaut. As a reward for a $8-a-month donation, your name will be listed on the website of the Kyrgyz Space Program.
Kathryn
$16 or more per month 12 patrons
Named after Kathryn Sullivan, the first woman to perform a spacewalk, this donation will be rewarded by a postcard from Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, signed by girls who will work on a satellite!
Anna
$32 or more per month 4 of 20 patrons
Anna Lee Fisher was the first mother to fly to space. We encourage mothers to join our program too! With this donation you'll get access to a once-in-three-months video chat with girls who build the satellite. We have to limit this type of a donation, because we won't handle a video chat with more than 20 people at the same time. :(
Mae
$64 or more per month 1 patron
Mae Jameson was the first African-American female astronaut. Yay! This donation is dedicated to all the people of colour who devoted their lives to space exploration. By subscribing to it, you will get an unusual reward -- three free online lessons on the history of Kyrgyzstan, the country you most likely heard little about.
Chiaki
$128 or more per month 0 patrons
Chiaki Mukai was the first Asian female astronaut. Moreover, she had TWO Shuttle flights, how cool was she! Those who donate us $128-a-month will get a t-shirt with illustrations dedicated to the Kyrgyz Space Program. One of these artworks (created by a talented Kyrgyz artist Tatyana Zelenskaya) you can see as the cover of this fundraising campaign.
Eileen
$256 or more per month 0 of 20 patrons
Named after Eileen Collins, the first female Shuttle commander, this donation is rewarded by having your name engraved on a metal plaque and put in a room where the satellite will be designed and built. Unfortunately, we have to limit the number of these rewards, because we don't have enough space for more than 20 plaques.
Anousheh
$512 or more per month 0 patrons
Anousheh Ansari was the first Muslim female astronaut. This means a lot for Kyrgyzstan, where most of the population are Muslims. It is easy to become Islamophobic when right-wing politicians are getting more and more power in the West. This donation will give you a special reward: one-to-one conversation with Muslim feminists or Muslim LGBTQ-activists about how diverse Islam can be! Very refreshing and cliche-breaking!
Peggy
$1,024 or more per month 0 of 10 patrons
Peggy Whitson holds the record for the most time in space among female astronauts. She spent astonishing 665 days cruising around our planet, mostly on the International Space Station. To commemorate her achievement, we are introducing this generous donation option. And there will be a generous reward: your name will be engraved on the cubesat itself (but with very-very small letters, unfortunately, because the satellite is so small).