Rob Landley is creating Open source software
10

patrons

$104
per month
My main projects right now are Toybox and Aboriginal Linux, although I do some work on toolchains, kernel, qemu, and documentation too.

My modus operandi is to dig down through superfluous layers of complexity to create simple, flexible systems you can reproduce from scratch, port wherever you like, and built from a small enough amount of code you can understand what it's doing and audit it for security problems. Treat complexity is a cost, and try to get the best bang for the buck.

It's basically glorified janitorial work. Most people race towards the new frontier, I follow behind cleaning up the mess. My goal is to figure out how to reproduce the experts' black magic, then make it look so easy that being an expert in it no longer means anything.

These days, turning Android into a self-hosting development environment seems like the best path forward, for reasons explained in the above video. (There are literally a billion smartphones preinstalled with Android. Having a phone ought to be enough to let you program the phone, down to the deepest level.) Releasing new code under a license that places it into the public domain allows the most flexible and widespread use.
Tiers
Pledge $1 or more per month
3 patrons
Do the thing. (General expression of support.)
Pledge $5 or more per month
0 patrons
Do the thing! (Louder expression of support.)
Pledge $5 or more per month
2 patrons
Do toybox. (Encourage me to spend more time on toybox, which has its own roadmap.)
Pledge $5 or more per month
2 patrons
Do system bootstrapping. (Encourage me to spend more time on Aboriginal Linux, which includes getting the Android Open Source Project to build under the minimal development environment it provides.)
Pledge $5 or more per month
1 patron
Do toolchains. (Come up with cross and native compiler/linker/assemblers that can build a runnable system and are freely binary distributable without obvious risk of license lawsuit. This includes writing a new "make", "lex", "yacc", and so on.)
Pledge $25 or more per month
2 patrons
Do all the things! (Enthusiastic expression of support.)
Pledge $25 or more per month
0 patrons
Do toybox! (Louder encouragement to spend time on toybox.)
Pledge $25 or more per month
0 patrons
Do system bootstrapping! (Louder encouragement to spend time on Aboriginal Linux and cleaning up AOSP.)
Pledge $25 or more per month
1 patron
Do toolchains! (Lounder encouragement to spend time getting a new toolchain working.)
Pledge $2,000 or more per month
0 of 5 patrons
Corporate sponsorship. Send me your todo list, I'll review it (via email, phone, or google hangouts), then take your priorities into account when choosing what order to work on things in one or more of the above projects, and send you monthly reports on progress towards your goals.

This won't change the nature of the projects, but can encourage me to include features I wouldn't otherwise bother with.
Goals
$104 of $500 per month
Do a weekly podcast about open source development.
2 of 3
My main projects right now are Toybox and Aboriginal Linux, although I do some work on toolchains, kernel, qemu, and documentation too.

My modus operandi is to dig down through superfluous layers of complexity to create simple, flexible systems you can reproduce from scratch, port wherever you like, and built from a small enough amount of code you can understand what it's doing and audit it for security problems. Treat complexity is a cost, and try to get the best bang for the buck.

It's basically glorified janitorial work. Most people race towards the new frontier, I follow behind cleaning up the mess. My goal is to figure out how to reproduce the experts' black magic, then make it look so easy that being an expert in it no longer means anything.

These days, turning Android into a self-hosting development environment seems like the best path forward, for reasons explained in the above video. (There are literally a billion smartphones preinstalled with Android. Having a phone ought to be enough to let you program the phone, down to the deepest level.) Releasing new code under a license that places it into the public domain allows the most flexible and widespread use.

Recent posts by Rob Landley

Tiers
Pledge $1 or more per month
3 patrons
Do the thing. (General expression of support.)
Pledge $5 or more per month
0 patrons
Do the thing! (Louder expression of support.)
Pledge $5 or more per month
2 patrons
Do toybox. (Encourage me to spend more time on toybox, which has its own roadmap.)
Pledge $5 or more per month
2 patrons
Do system bootstrapping. (Encourage me to spend more time on Aboriginal Linux, which includes getting the Android Open Source Project to build under the minimal development environment it provides.)
Pledge $5 or more per month
1 patron
Do toolchains. (Come up with cross and native compiler/linker/assemblers that can build a runnable system and are freely binary distributable without obvious risk of license lawsuit. This includes writing a new "make", "lex", "yacc", and so on.)
Pledge $25 or more per month
2 patrons
Do all the things! (Enthusiastic expression of support.)
Pledge $25 or more per month
0 patrons
Do toybox! (Louder encouragement to spend time on toybox.)
Pledge $25 or more per month
0 patrons
Do system bootstrapping! (Louder encouragement to spend time on Aboriginal Linux and cleaning up AOSP.)
Pledge $25 or more per month
1 patron
Do toolchains! (Lounder encouragement to spend time getting a new toolchain working.)
Pledge $2,000 or more per month
0 of 5 patrons
Corporate sponsorship. Send me your todo list, I'll review it (via email, phone, or google hangouts), then take your priorities into account when choosing what order to work on things in one or more of the above projects, and send you monthly reports on progress towards your goals.

This won't change the nature of the projects, but can encourage me to include features I wouldn't otherwise bother with.