Maja Stabel is creating drawings and zero waste fashion
2

patrons

Hello!
My name is Maja Stabel and I’m a Norwegian fashion designer, teacher and illustrator. I would be thrilled if you want to join me on this journey of drawing, designing, making and crafting. I get a rush from making things - it's a pretty special feeling to be in this flow of creating and I would love to show you how I work and inspire you to start crafting and creating yourself! I draw and make clothes and would like to share both worlds with you. I draw with my left hand even though I'm right handed and I make clothes with as little waste as possible - a practice called zero waste fashion design.

Could you say a little about what zero waste design is and your fascination for it?
Zero waste design within the fashion industry is about pattern construction - about designing waste out of the production of clothes. I have figured a way to do this by only putting different sized rectangles together as a jigsaw puzzle.
The idea is that this pattern should fit the fabric roll and not waste anything, but this is not always easy to attain as different fabrics has different width. That’s why I want to underline that it’s the principal that is important here where we try to waste as little as possible and if there are any scraps left it’s usually rectangled and you can use it to make shoppingbags or maybe you can add another detail to your item! If the pattern doesn’t fit your fabric – either because the fabric width is too small or you have added centimeters to make the item bigger I would recommend to just puzzle the pattern pieces together as best as you can on the fabric – as they’re all rectangles it should be quite easy.

Because this is another thing I need to pinpoint; I’m not a perfectionist – far from it! I love to work spontanously and intuitively and add fabric pieces as I go. Actually this way of designing is a reversed process where you start with the pattern and figure out a way to make it work with the fabric you got instead of designing a finished item on a piece of paper. And this is what I love about it; that you are challenged to find new solutions and that you have to be creative with what you got. So jump in there and use my patterns as a base, but by all means; be creative with it if you feel like it! Find your own solutions and twists and try to make use of all the fabric you got. The focus is not on the technical side of sewing, but on the creative side ;)  When you distance yourself from the conventional way of constructing patterns, zero waste design can be a tool for innovation.

Sizes
I work with one size only and this would probably fit an European size 38-40 . With that said I make clothes that are meant to be loose so it would probably fit a 42 and be perfectly oversized for a size 36. I would recommend that you make your measurements (around the breast, the waist and the hips) and either add or cut centimeters to make it fit you. Try a bit and see what works for you.

What was your motivation for bringing zero waste fashion design to the home sewing market?
I really wanted to have a sustainable business model that was different from the conventional one where you produce new collections all the time that encourage consumerism and contribute to a growing waste problem. I wanted to cut the production face - at least the one where I produce a bunch of clothes in India or China and would be forced to sell a huge quantity of clothes to make it go around. Probably I would have to sell a lot on sale as well because it's impossible to estimate how much you are going to sell.

Then I thought that the way I make my zero waste patterns are very easy to learn and understand, so why not make people produce their own clothes? Last year I studies pedagogics and discovered how much I enjoyed teaching. I ran a zero waste assignment in a class and it was so much fun so that's when I figured I could run my own zero waste workshops as well. And now I had two successful workshops! Then a friend of mine tipped me about this amazing page where I could put out my patterns and people could subscribe and I couldn’t be more excited about it! Hopefully this can help me explore zero waste design even more and at the same time I get to share it with the world in the most sustainable way (no wrong productions, big storages, shipping’s around the world, poor working conditions etc etc.)

Love to see your finished zero waste clothes on Instagram - tag me @majastabel ;)
I'm truly grateful that you support my work and for those of you that want to use my patterns; I wish you the best of luck with the sewing and don't hesitate to ask questions :) Enjoy!

//Maja

Goals
1% complete
I would love to have more time to create, explore, inspire, teach and share. This would be the first step on the way towards creative freedom.
1 of 1
Hello!
My name is Maja Stabel and I’m a Norwegian fashion designer, teacher and illustrator. I would be thrilled if you want to join me on this journey of drawing, designing, making and crafting. I get a rush from making things - it's a pretty special feeling to be in this flow of creating and I would love to show you how I work and inspire you to start crafting and creating yourself! I draw and make clothes and would like to share both worlds with you. I draw with my left hand even though I'm right handed and I make clothes with as little waste as possible - a practice called zero waste fashion design.

Could you say a little about what zero waste design is and your fascination for it?
Zero waste design within the fashion industry is about pattern construction - about designing waste out of the production of clothes. I have figured a way to do this by only putting different sized rectangles together as a jigsaw puzzle.
The idea is that this pattern should fit the fabric roll and not waste anything, but this is not always easy to attain as different fabrics has different width. That’s why I want to underline that it’s the principal that is important here where we try to waste as little as possible and if there are any scraps left it’s usually rectangled and you can use it to make shoppingbags or maybe you can add another detail to your item! If the pattern doesn’t fit your fabric – either because the fabric width is too small or you have added centimeters to make the item bigger I would recommend to just puzzle the pattern pieces together as best as you can on the fabric – as they’re all rectangles it should be quite easy.

Because this is another thing I need to pinpoint; I’m not a perfectionist – far from it! I love to work spontanously and intuitively and add fabric pieces as I go. Actually this way of designing is a reversed process where you start with the pattern and figure out a way to make it work with the fabric you got instead of designing a finished item on a piece of paper. And this is what I love about it; that you are challenged to find new solutions and that you have to be creative with what you got. So jump in there and use my patterns as a base, but by all means; be creative with it if you feel like it! Find your own solutions and twists and try to make use of all the fabric you got. The focus is not on the technical side of sewing, but on the creative side ;)  When you distance yourself from the conventional way of constructing patterns, zero waste design can be a tool for innovation.

Sizes
I work with one size only and this would probably fit an European size 38-40 . With that said I make clothes that are meant to be loose so it would probably fit a 42 and be perfectly oversized for a size 36. I would recommend that you make your measurements (around the breast, the waist and the hips) and either add or cut centimeters to make it fit you. Try a bit and see what works for you.

What was your motivation for bringing zero waste fashion design to the home sewing market?
I really wanted to have a sustainable business model that was different from the conventional one where you produce new collections all the time that encourage consumerism and contribute to a growing waste problem. I wanted to cut the production face - at least the one where I produce a bunch of clothes in India or China and would be forced to sell a huge quantity of clothes to make it go around. Probably I would have to sell a lot on sale as well because it's impossible to estimate how much you are going to sell.

Then I thought that the way I make my zero waste patterns are very easy to learn and understand, so why not make people produce their own clothes? Last year I studies pedagogics and discovered how much I enjoyed teaching. I ran a zero waste assignment in a class and it was so much fun so that's when I figured I could run my own zero waste workshops as well. And now I had two successful workshops! Then a friend of mine tipped me about this amazing page where I could put out my patterns and people could subscribe and I couldn’t be more excited about it! Hopefully this can help me explore zero waste design even more and at the same time I get to share it with the world in the most sustainable way (no wrong productions, big storages, shipping’s around the world, poor working conditions etc etc.)

Love to see your finished zero waste clothes on Instagram - tag me @majastabel ;)
I'm truly grateful that you support my work and for those of you that want to use my patterns; I wish you the best of luck with the sewing and don't hesitate to ask questions :) Enjoy!

//Maja

Recent posts by Maja Stabel