Maren Hunsberger is creating science videos
7

patrons

$39
per creation
I'm a creator. Of videos, words, art, performances, and stories of all kinds—but especially about science, tech, and our natural world. You can count on me to ask a lot of questions, wear loud colors, and be interested, enthusiastic and curious about pretty much everything. I'm making videos answering your questions about why the universe, our bodies and our technology are the way they are...and how they work. I make things for Seeker Media, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and many more, but this page is for my personal work on my YouTube channel.
Tiers
Planula Larvae
$5 or more per creation

For $5, you will receive a surprise science-themed sticker for the month that you donated!


Planula Larvae: The life cycle stage of a jellyfish after the eggs of the female jellyfish are fertilized by the male's sperm. The free-swimming "planula" larvae emerge from the female's mouth or brood pouch and set out on their own. A planula is a tiny oval structure the outer layer of which is lined with minute hairs called cilia, which beat together to propel the larva through the water (however, this motive force is minimal compared to ocean currents, which can transport the larva over very long distances). The planula larva floats for a few days on the surface of the water; if it isn't eaten by predators, it soon drops down to settle on a solid substrate and begin its development into a polyp.


Thanks so much for supporting this first tier!

Polyps
$10 or more per creation

When you donate $10, I will write your name in the end credits of the videos that I post in the month that you donated!


Polyp: After settling to the sea floor, the planula larva stage of the jellyfish attaches itself to a hard surface and transforms into a polyp (also known as a scyphistoma), a cylindrical, stalk-like structure. At the base of the polyp is a disc that adheres to the substrate, and at its top is a mouth opening surrounded by small tentacles. The polyp feeds by drawing food into its mouth, and as it grows it begins to bud new polyps from its trunk, forming a polyp hydroid colony (or strobilating scyphistomata; try saying that ten times fast) in which the individual polyps are linked together by feeding tubes. When the polyps reach the appropriate size (which can take several years), they begin the next stage in the jellyfish life cycle.


Thanks so much for supporting this second tier!

Ephyra
$15 or more per creation

When you donate $15, I will send you a handwritten note with my thanks and a fun science fact (if you want a science fact on a specific topic, please indicate what topic you'd prefer at checkout).


Ephyra: When the polyp hydroid colony is ready for the next stage in its development, the stalk portions of their polyps begin to develop horizontal grooves, a process known as strobilation. These grooves continue to deepen until the polyp resembles a stack of saucers; the topmost groove matures the fastest and eventually buds off as a tiny baby jellyfish, technically known as an ephyra, characterized by its arm-like protrusions rather than full, round bell. (The budding process by which polyps release ephyrae is asexual, meaning that jellyfish reproduce both sexually and asexually!).


Thanks so much for supporting this third tier!

Medusa
$25 or more per creation

When you donate $20, you will receive a channel t-shirt (design TBD).


Medusa: The free-swimming ephyra jellyfish stage grows in size and gradually turns into an adult jellyfish (known as a medusa) possessing a smooth, translucent bell.


Thanks so much for supporting this fourth tier!

I'm a creator. Of videos, words, art, performances, and stories of all kinds—but especially about science, tech, and our natural world. You can count on me to ask a lot of questions, wear loud colors, and be interested, enthusiastic and curious about pretty much everything. I'm making videos answering your questions about why the universe, our bodies and our technology are the way they are...and how they work. I make things for Seeker Media, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and many more, but this page is for my personal work on my YouTube channel.

Recent posts by Maren Hunsberger

Tiers
Planula Larvae
$5 or more per creation

For $5, you will receive a surprise science-themed sticker for the month that you donated!


Planula Larvae: The life cycle stage of a jellyfish after the eggs of the female jellyfish are fertilized by the male's sperm. The free-swimming "planula" larvae emerge from the female's mouth or brood pouch and set out on their own. A planula is a tiny oval structure the outer layer of which is lined with minute hairs called cilia, which beat together to propel the larva through the water (however, this motive force is minimal compared to ocean currents, which can transport the larva over very long distances). The planula larva floats for a few days on the surface of the water; if it isn't eaten by predators, it soon drops down to settle on a solid substrate and begin its development into a polyp.


Thanks so much for supporting this first tier!

Polyps
$10 or more per creation

When you donate $10, I will write your name in the end credits of the videos that I post in the month that you donated!


Polyp: After settling to the sea floor, the planula larva stage of the jellyfish attaches itself to a hard surface and transforms into a polyp (also known as a scyphistoma), a cylindrical, stalk-like structure. At the base of the polyp is a disc that adheres to the substrate, and at its top is a mouth opening surrounded by small tentacles. The polyp feeds by drawing food into its mouth, and as it grows it begins to bud new polyps from its trunk, forming a polyp hydroid colony (or strobilating scyphistomata; try saying that ten times fast) in which the individual polyps are linked together by feeding tubes. When the polyps reach the appropriate size (which can take several years), they begin the next stage in the jellyfish life cycle.


Thanks so much for supporting this second tier!

Ephyra
$15 or more per creation

When you donate $15, I will send you a handwritten note with my thanks and a fun science fact (if you want a science fact on a specific topic, please indicate what topic you'd prefer at checkout).


Ephyra: When the polyp hydroid colony is ready for the next stage in its development, the stalk portions of their polyps begin to develop horizontal grooves, a process known as strobilation. These grooves continue to deepen until the polyp resembles a stack of saucers; the topmost groove matures the fastest and eventually buds off as a tiny baby jellyfish, technically known as an ephyra, characterized by its arm-like protrusions rather than full, round bell. (The budding process by which polyps release ephyrae is asexual, meaning that jellyfish reproduce both sexually and asexually!).


Thanks so much for supporting this third tier!

Medusa
$25 or more per creation

When you donate $20, you will receive a channel t-shirt (design TBD).


Medusa: The free-swimming ephyra jellyfish stage grows in size and gradually turns into an adult jellyfish (known as a medusa) possessing a smooth, translucent bell.


Thanks so much for supporting this fourth tier!