Matt Keene

is creating a nature documentary

1

patron

$18

per month
Following up on "Lost Springs" and "River be dammed,"

Matt Keene has started a new film
about Florida's struggling
Ocklawaha River.


Dirt Poor Sweet Water



A film about how difficult it is to not be a human.

"Dirt Poor Sweet Water" is the story of a young cypress seedling growing behind an old dam.

This project aims to document a floodplain forest on the edge of the Ocklawaha River in north-central Florida during the 2019-20 drawdown of the Rodman Impoundment. The audience will see a floodplain ecosystem during its winter to spring cycle with the swamp's diverse and important flora and fauna captured in 4K. The principal character will be a cypress seedling and the main focus will be this seedling's growth amidst a temporary but fantastic natural community. Timelapse and macro photography will be used and the film will tell a fully scripted story via audio and closed-caption narration.

The continued operation of the Kirkpatrick Dam and the shadow of the Rodman Impoundment will be a direct antagonist to the floodplain forest as the end of the drawdown means a permanent and likely-fatal end to the seedling and other emerging swamp habitat due to prolonged flooding.

"Dirt Poor Sweet Water" will be a nature film with a haunting tone and lasting message about how lively and rich natural communities remain in spite of the carelessness and continued harm of human activity.


What can you expect?

Patreon provides space for an intimate look at the floodplains of the Ocklawaha River through the development of the film. It is the journal to this project with original nature writings and photography of Matt Keene as well as exclusive, behind-the-scenes photos and video of the production and techniques used.

This film is a passion project and will reflect Matt's writing, editing and visual style.

It will not compromise in its reproach of the dam.

Thank you for your support. I look forward to sharing this journey with you.

For a wild and free Ocklawaha around every bend,

Matt Keene

Following up on "Lost Springs" and "River be dammed,"

Matt Keene has started a new film
about Florida's struggling
Ocklawaha River.


Dirt Poor Sweet Water



A film about how difficult it is to not be a human.

"Dirt Poor Sweet Water" is the story of a young cypress seedling growing behind an old dam.

This project aims to document a floodplain forest on the edge of the Ocklawaha River in north-central Florida during the 2019-20 drawdown of the Rodman Impoundment. The audience will see a floodplain ecosystem during its winter to spring cycle with the swamp's diverse and important flora and fauna captured in 4K. The principal character will be a cypress seedling and the main focus will be this seedling's growth amidst a temporary but fantastic natural community. Timelapse and macro photography will be used and the film will tell a fully scripted story via audio and closed-caption narration.

The continued operation of the Kirkpatrick Dam and the shadow of the Rodman Impoundment will be a direct antagonist to the floodplain forest as the end of the drawdown means a permanent and likely-fatal end to the seedling and other emerging swamp habitat due to prolonged flooding.

"Dirt Poor Sweet Water" will be a nature film with a haunting tone and lasting message about how lively and rich natural communities remain in spite of the carelessness and continued harm of human activity.


What can you expect?

Patreon provides space for an intimate look at the floodplains of the Ocklawaha River through the development of the film. It is the journal to this project with original nature writings and photography of Matt Keene as well as exclusive, behind-the-scenes photos and video of the production and techniques used.

This film is a passion project and will reflect Matt's writing, editing and visual style.

It will not compromise in its reproach of the dam.

Thank you for your support. I look forward to sharing this journey with you.

For a wild and free Ocklawaha around every bend,

Matt Keene

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