On Record

is creating podcasts

0

patrons

$0

per month

What you will get for subscribing

I will be producing bonus content on a somewhat frequent basis. The Patreon will contain the main episode feed as well as interviews, side stories, basically anything that doesn’t fit into the in-depth album analysis that the main feed will contain. I’ll talk about everything from a perfectly placed song in a movie scene to my favorite wrestler’s entrance music. Additionally, every subscriber will be entered into monthly sweepstakes to receive a vinyl copy of the album that’s covered on the main feed. All of this for only $5 a month. That means you’ll receive all On Record episodes, bonus episodes, side stories, interviews, and possibly even a brand new record each month for only $5. Obviously subscribing is not mandatory and the main feed will always be free and fully archived, but since this podcast takes a lot of time and effort to produce, a little bit would go a long way.

How this music podcast came to be

The first time I can really recall loving music was with a birthday song. Not the birthday song, that family members and coworkers come together every so often and sing, with no mind for key or rhythm, but a rather different one, sung from outer space through a creaky cassette tape at ungodly early hours on every birthday morning. The singer was Captain Zoom, of Space Command, wishing me a happy birthday and searching the cosmos for the perfect gift. He was surely an inspiration for Buzz Lightyear, on the off chance that John Lasseter happened by the same spinning rack of cassettes in the same Arkansas gas station or souvenir shop that my mom did in the early nineties, where she found tapes for both mine and my sister's names. The song was at once eerie and whimsical, compounded by the fact that I would typically be in a state of hypnopompic reluctance. In this land between sleep and wakefulness, Captain Zoom's odd tones and descriptions of far-off lands and creatures had a transportive effect. Of course, as time went by, the cassette's creakiness grew with my I'm just over it, mom attitude, but something of those early years stuck.

It wasn't that Captain Zoom was a profound songwriter or master of melody and rhythm, though the song definitely had an earworm quality to it. It was something more elemental, to me. That song signified something each birthday morning: that there was love in our household, no matter how embarrassing it all got to me in my teens, and that love was going to drive our family to make whatever day that creaky tape played a good one for whomever it was that it played, long before the roosters crowed. It was an evoker of feeling, of happiness, and still is, as our family was able to track down Captain Zoom online and purchase all of our names on MP3, forever to be played, texted, or sung, however far we might be. We have even welcomed new members of the family with their own song, from my wife to my nephew and his father. Perhaps best of all, I even got to return the favor after all of those years and send my mom the MP3 way too early in the morning on her birthdays.

That elemental connection between music and feeling is ultimately what led me here, to this podcast. Many cassettes came and went, from the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III soundtrack, on which I would endlessly loop the Barrio Boyzz's cover of Gloria Estefan's "Conga," Baltimora's "Tarzan Boy," and Technotronic's "Rocking Over the Beat," all songs that could really only ever call to mind the feudal Japan setting of the film, to the last I owned on that medium, Michael Jackson's compilation album, History. As a kid, music was often experienced in a dark bedroom after listening to a Braves game on the radio, making me feel happy and safe in the same way Zoom did each year.

With the compact disc came my preteen and teen years. I remember the first CDs I got, alongside my first CD player, were Mariah Carey's Butterfly and Jock Rock, a compilation album of songs meant to be played from stadium PA systems. Perhaps you can already see that my tastes were fractured into a million different directions early on. Boy bands came, and I was not ashamed. Pop-punk took over, I have had many Dave Matthews phases. Around middle school, I discovered the guitar, and with it, classic rock. My path was set in that direction for many years as I learned that music felt even better when coming from and through my own body. Songs became little three-dimensional puzzles or trinkets to take apart and solve, learning how and why the various mechanisms served to make me feel this way or that.

I believe that this podcast will ultimately serve as a continuation of that quest, one which I've never really abandoned. I may not play music much anymore, but the ways in which a song can pull the feelings in one direction or another remains, to this day, the most fascinating aspect of the art form to me. It is the language that eschews all translation and strikes right at the meaning of a thing, somewhere deep and often untapped. Over the years I have acquired many touchstone pieces of music that evoke that wonder most deeply within myself, as CDs made way for digital files, and I discovered a love for vinyl records. My goal here is to both attempt to convey why and how it is that this song or that album is able to achieve this, but also unearth a bit of the story behind how the stars somehow aligned to create the circumstances under which it was possible for the artists to make it happen. Think of this podcast as one part analysis and one part history, with probably a lot of parts of tearing up just talking about all of this stuff that has enriched all of our lives. I'm an emotional guy, what can I say?

I hope to come a little closer to making sense of the magic of music and how it is so moving toward whatever emotional goal is sought after, and I hope that you will come along with me. The structure of the show will largely be threefold: I'll tell the story of how the album has come to affect my life, then I'll tell the story of how that album came to be, and finally I will ask that you tell your story as well, about why music is important to you. We will have some laughs, wax poetic, probably make totally incorrect claims about the meaning of songs, all in the service of simply paying homage to the hard work and glorious bouts of inspiration that have come to the geniuses throughout our history. Together, we will cover all types of music, genres, and artists. My goal is for there to be something for everyone. We will go from grimy London pubs to massive American stadiums. From tight, confined bedrooms to state-of-the-art studios. We will go from the hills of Appalachia to the streets of Compton. We will even go beyond the stars, where maybe we will get a glimpse of Captain Zoom blasting by in his ship, packed full of alien birthday presents.

I am Jeff Pearson of the Bit Players Network, and this is On Record.
Tiers
On Record PLUS+
$5 or more per month

Main Episode Feed

  • Every main feed episode of On Record
  • Monthly breakdowns of some of history's greatest albums

Bonus Episode Feed

  • Interviews
  • Minisodes
  • Side Stories
  • Lists
  • Q&As
  • Monthly Mixes
  • Trivia Episodes
  • Lots of other randomness!

Monthly Vinyl Sweepstakes

  • Chance to win a new vinyl copy of one of the main feed albums

What you will get for subscribing

I will be producing bonus content on a somewhat frequent basis. The Patreon will contain the main episode feed as well as interviews, side stories, basically anything that doesn’t fit into the in-depth album analysis that the main feed will contain. I’ll talk about everything from a perfectly placed song in a movie scene to my favorite wrestler’s entrance music. Additionally, every subscriber will be entered into monthly sweepstakes to receive a vinyl copy of the album that’s covered on the main feed. All of this for only $5 a month. That means you’ll receive all On Record episodes, bonus episodes, side stories, interviews, and possibly even a brand new record each month for only $5. Obviously subscribing is not mandatory and the main feed will always be free and fully archived, but since this podcast takes a lot of time and effort to produce, a little bit would go a long way.

How this music podcast came to be

The first time I can really recall loving music was with a birthday song. Not the birthday song, that family members and coworkers come together every so often and sing, with no mind for key or rhythm, but a rather different one, sung from outer space through a creaky cassette tape at ungodly early hours on every birthday morning. The singer was Captain Zoom, of Space Command, wishing me a happy birthday and searching the cosmos for the perfect gift. He was surely an inspiration for Buzz Lightyear, on the off chance that John Lasseter happened by the same spinning rack of cassettes in the same Arkansas gas station or souvenir shop that my mom did in the early nineties, where she found tapes for both mine and my sister's names. The song was at once eerie and whimsical, compounded by the fact that I would typically be in a state of hypnopompic reluctance. In this land between sleep and wakefulness, Captain Zoom's odd tones and descriptions of far-off lands and creatures had a transportive effect. Of course, as time went by, the cassette's creakiness grew with my I'm just over it, mom attitude, but something of those early years stuck.

It wasn't that Captain Zoom was a profound songwriter or master of melody and rhythm, though the song definitely had an earworm quality to it. It was something more elemental, to me. That song signified something each birthday morning: that there was love in our household, no matter how embarrassing it all got to me in my teens, and that love was going to drive our family to make whatever day that creaky tape played a good one for whomever it was that it played, long before the roosters crowed. It was an evoker of feeling, of happiness, and still is, as our family was able to track down Captain Zoom online and purchase all of our names on MP3, forever to be played, texted, or sung, however far we might be. We have even welcomed new members of the family with their own song, from my wife to my nephew and his father. Perhaps best of all, I even got to return the favor after all of those years and send my mom the MP3 way too early in the morning on her birthdays.

That elemental connection between music and feeling is ultimately what led me here, to this podcast. Many cassettes came and went, from the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III soundtrack, on which I would endlessly loop the Barrio Boyzz's cover of Gloria Estefan's "Conga," Baltimora's "Tarzan Boy," and Technotronic's "Rocking Over the Beat," all songs that could really only ever call to mind the feudal Japan setting of the film, to the last I owned on that medium, Michael Jackson's compilation album, History. As a kid, music was often experienced in a dark bedroom after listening to a Braves game on the radio, making me feel happy and safe in the same way Zoom did each year.

With the compact disc came my preteen and teen years. I remember the first CDs I got, alongside my first CD player, were Mariah Carey's Butterfly and Jock Rock, a compilation album of songs meant to be played from stadium PA systems. Perhaps you can already see that my tastes were fractured into a million different directions early on. Boy bands came, and I was not ashamed. Pop-punk took over, I have had many Dave Matthews phases. Around middle school, I discovered the guitar, and with it, classic rock. My path was set in that direction for many years as I learned that music felt even better when coming from and through my own body. Songs became little three-dimensional puzzles or trinkets to take apart and solve, learning how and why the various mechanisms served to make me feel this way or that.

I believe that this podcast will ultimately serve as a continuation of that quest, one which I've never really abandoned. I may not play music much anymore, but the ways in which a song can pull the feelings in one direction or another remains, to this day, the most fascinating aspect of the art form to me. It is the language that eschews all translation and strikes right at the meaning of a thing, somewhere deep and often untapped. Over the years I have acquired many touchstone pieces of music that evoke that wonder most deeply within myself, as CDs made way for digital files, and I discovered a love for vinyl records. My goal here is to both attempt to convey why and how it is that this song or that album is able to achieve this, but also unearth a bit of the story behind how the stars somehow aligned to create the circumstances under which it was possible for the artists to make it happen. Think of this podcast as one part analysis and one part history, with probably a lot of parts of tearing up just talking about all of this stuff that has enriched all of our lives. I'm an emotional guy, what can I say?

I hope to come a little closer to making sense of the magic of music and how it is so moving toward whatever emotional goal is sought after, and I hope that you will come along with me. The structure of the show will largely be threefold: I'll tell the story of how the album has come to affect my life, then I'll tell the story of how that album came to be, and finally I will ask that you tell your story as well, about why music is important to you. We will have some laughs, wax poetic, probably make totally incorrect claims about the meaning of songs, all in the service of simply paying homage to the hard work and glorious bouts of inspiration that have come to the geniuses throughout our history. Together, we will cover all types of music, genres, and artists. My goal is for there to be something for everyone. We will go from grimy London pubs to massive American stadiums. From tight, confined bedrooms to state-of-the-art studios. We will go from the hills of Appalachia to the streets of Compton. We will even go beyond the stars, where maybe we will get a glimpse of Captain Zoom blasting by in his ship, packed full of alien birthday presents.

I am Jeff Pearson of the Bit Players Network, and this is On Record.

Recent posts by On Record

Tiers
On Record PLUS+
$5 or more per month

Main Episode Feed

  • Every main feed episode of On Record
  • Monthly breakdowns of some of history's greatest albums

Bonus Episode Feed

  • Interviews
  • Minisodes
  • Side Stories
  • Lists
  • Q&As
  • Monthly Mixes
  • Trivia Episodes
  • Lots of other randomness!

Monthly Vinyl Sweepstakes

  • Chance to win a new vinyl copy of one of the main feed albums