Ooker is creating insightful equations
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Have you ever:
  • seen someone important to you (or even you) trying so hard, hoping so much, but the outcome is just out of their grasp, that failure's all they've known?
  • felt incapable to listen to a conversation between a stone and a tree? That despite all the best in technology and humanity, you can't just understand what your cat is talking about?
  • had mental blocks that you can't manage to describe what you know, to get others see what you see?
  • or simply wished that a day has 48 hours, so that you can do what you want and enjoy your life unhurriedly?
Your question, regardless what it is, is left unresolved. No one can help you, and you are on your own.

There is a longtime kid's riddle: "How do you put an elephant in a fridge?" The answer, as you may already know, is "open the fridge". But why is that? Why can "just do it" resolve a paradoxical, seemingly unsolvable question? I think, it's because at the very moment you look into the fridge, your perspective changes, and your mind is ready to think outside the box.

Your perspective changes, and your mind is ready to think outside the box. Isn't this what we are all looking for? Isn't this what we call science, magic, poetry, philosophy? Isn't this the reason for hope, love, bravery, ecstasy? Isn't this happening in your subconsciousness, in front of your eyes, in everything you do, and in every moment of your life? What we are always looking for is what we are always looking at.

In mathematics, the field studies about perspectives is called projective geometry. It turns out that Einstein's (special) relativity is essentially projective geometry. It turns out that Fourier transform, the foundation of our modernity, is essentially Einstein's relativity. And from what I understand from Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha, it also turns out that this is what the Buddha had enlightened thousand years ago.

He had enlightened, but he couldn't explain the concept. He had tried, but the words were just out of his grasp. He had to coin terms like kalpa, nirvana, and so on, not because he wanted us to believe in that, but because it was the only way he could find to convey his thoughts. His life would have been much easier if only someone had taught him Fourier transform.

Now we can describe it mathematically, yet we are no better than him in explaining the concept to a kid. Inside the device you are using to read this is the knowledge that Buddha must have always dreamt of, yet hardly one acknowledges that fundamental thing, let alone fully appreciate it.

I believe we can do that. If a baby has a capacity to enjoy Mozart's sonata No. 16 in C, then there is no reason Fourier transform cannot be explained to them. All we need to do is to allow ourselves to have a different perspective, to have a different eyeglass. In fact, when choosing books I usually imagine the book is a painting, yet I forget to bring my eyeglasses. If every time I close my eyes and reopen them I see a new painting, yet I still don't feel vague with it, then that book is worth reading.

So I would like to have an opportunity to wear new eyeglasses to contemporary sciences. You can read my research to know more about my techniques and theory behinds it. Thank you so much for your reading.
Tiers
Lightninged
$10 or more per month 0 patrons
Give me any concept and I will write a prose for you.


The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter—it's the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning. (Mark Twain)

Goals
$0 of $300 per month
Reading graduate-level textbooks is really a full-time job, and full-time content cannot be expected to be produced by part-timers. I'll try to do as much as I can though.
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Have you ever:
  • seen someone important to you (or even you) trying so hard, hoping so much, but the outcome is just out of their grasp, that failure's all they've known?
  • felt incapable to listen to a conversation between a stone and a tree? That despite all the best in technology and humanity, you can't just understand what your cat is talking about?
  • had mental blocks that you can't manage to describe what you know, to get others see what you see?
  • or simply wished that a day has 48 hours, so that you can do what you want and enjoy your life unhurriedly?
Your question, regardless what it is, is left unresolved. No one can help you, and you are on your own.

There is a longtime kid's riddle: "How do you put an elephant in a fridge?" The answer, as you may already know, is "open the fridge". But why is that? Why can "just do it" resolve a paradoxical, seemingly unsolvable question? I think, it's because at the very moment you look into the fridge, your perspective changes, and your mind is ready to think outside the box.

Your perspective changes, and your mind is ready to think outside the box. Isn't this what we are all looking for? Isn't this what we call science, magic, poetry, philosophy? Isn't this the reason for hope, love, bravery, ecstasy? Isn't this happening in your subconsciousness, in front of your eyes, in everything you do, and in every moment of your life? What we are always looking for is what we are always looking at.

In mathematics, the field studies about perspectives is called projective geometry. It turns out that Einstein's (special) relativity is essentially projective geometry. It turns out that Fourier transform, the foundation of our modernity, is essentially Einstein's relativity. And from what I understand from Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha, it also turns out that this is what the Buddha had enlightened thousand years ago.

He had enlightened, but he couldn't explain the concept. He had tried, but the words were just out of his grasp. He had to coin terms like kalpa, nirvana, and so on, not because he wanted us to believe in that, but because it was the only way he could find to convey his thoughts. His life would have been much easier if only someone had taught him Fourier transform.

Now we can describe it mathematically, yet we are no better than him in explaining the concept to a kid. Inside the device you are using to read this is the knowledge that Buddha must have always dreamt of, yet hardly one acknowledges that fundamental thing, let alone fully appreciate it.

I believe we can do that. If a baby has a capacity to enjoy Mozart's sonata No. 16 in C, then there is no reason Fourier transform cannot be explained to them. All we need to do is to allow ourselves to have a different perspective, to have a different eyeglass. In fact, when choosing books I usually imagine the book is a painting, yet I forget to bring my eyeglasses. If every time I close my eyes and reopen them I see a new painting, yet I still don't feel vague with it, then that book is worth reading.

So I would like to have an opportunity to wear new eyeglasses to contemporary sciences. You can read my research to know more about my techniques and theory behinds it. Thank you so much for your reading.

Recent posts by Ooker

Tiers
Lightninged
$10 or more per month 0 patrons
Give me any concept and I will write a prose for you.


The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter—it's the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning. (Mark Twain)