Physical Attraction is creating the podcast that explains physics, one chat-up line at a time
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patrons

If you're reading this, it means that you're considering donating to Physical Attraction via Patreon. And that means that I owe you some very squishy, very drippy chat-up lines. Thank you so much.

By donating to the show, not only do you express your thanks for the content that you hopefully enjoy, but you also make it possible for me to carry on going: it will help to pay hosting costs, I can put it in a fund towards new equipment, and books aren't cheap either. But more than any of that - if you love podcasts as much as I do, you'll appreciate that they can provide, for free, a better source of entertainment than billion-dollar movies and TV shows. You'll appreciate the thrill of excitement when a new episode drops. You'll grow to love the voices that have kept you company before falling asleep, or while you're cooking or doing household chores, making the day easier to get through. I don't know if my podcast will ever reach those levels. But I will try my best to make it as good as I can. But without an audience, without your support, we're nothing.

I hope to offer contributors - as well as all of this gratitude - full episode scripts, commentary, reviews of the books that I use for the show, and eventually a feed with bonus episodes for those who donate a little more. These will probably be released irregularly, as funding drives, but it's always nice to get something back for your support.

Science communication feels more important than it ever has. We face so many challenges, and a choice: embrace our present and future, so much of which is based on scientific endeavour, or remain forever children. My goal is to talk to you about the ideas that blow my mind, and change the world... and maybe flirt a little on the side.

I studied physics for four years, during which time I did a lot of problem sets and almost no chatting-up. Which might be familiar to any other physics students out there. But one thing I did notice was how the subject is just filled to the brim with innuendoes. It seemed that every way I looked, there were hot, dense bodies, fully degenerate limits, or just… references to wet and dry friction. So I wrote a whole bunch of physics based chat-up lines… more as a kind of ironic “Haha I’m going to die alone” type exercise than as a genuine attempt to attract people. And then ended up having to deliver them in a speech to a room filled with tutors and students...

Anyway, this would have been just another side-note in a life filled with tragicomic events. Except I still had all the chat-up lines, lurking in a dark and musty corner of my computer. And I still had a whole bunch of physics knowledge, lurking in a dark and musty corner of my brain. And I wanted to demonstrate to the world that I’ve got the moves, as well as the looks. And I thought, maybe, just maybe, some of you out there are trying to seduce physicists, and you could use a little help, or you’re trying to learn physics, and you could use a little light relief. So in this podcast, I’m going to explain some ideas about physics using my chat-up lines. This will combine my four great passions in life: awful puns, awful flirting, awful physics, and blathering endlessly on about stuff that no-one could possibly be interested in.
If you're reading this, it means that you're considering donating to Physical Attraction via Patreon. And that means that I owe you some very squishy, very drippy chat-up lines. Thank you so much.

By donating to the show, not only do you express your thanks for the content that you hopefully enjoy, but you also make it possible for me to carry on going: it will help to pay hosting costs, I can put it in a fund towards new equipment, and books aren't cheap either. But more than any of that - if you love podcasts as much as I do, you'll appreciate that they can provide, for free, a better source of entertainment than billion-dollar movies and TV shows. You'll appreciate the thrill of excitement when a new episode drops. You'll grow to love the voices that have kept you company before falling asleep, or while you're cooking or doing household chores, making the day easier to get through. I don't know if my podcast will ever reach those levels. But I will try my best to make it as good as I can. But without an audience, without your support, we're nothing.

I hope to offer contributors - as well as all of this gratitude - full episode scripts, commentary, reviews of the books that I use for the show, and eventually a feed with bonus episodes for those who donate a little more. These will probably be released irregularly, as funding drives, but it's always nice to get something back for your support.

Science communication feels more important than it ever has. We face so many challenges, and a choice: embrace our present and future, so much of which is based on scientific endeavour, or remain forever children. My goal is to talk to you about the ideas that blow my mind, and change the world... and maybe flirt a little on the side.

I studied physics for four years, during which time I did a lot of problem sets and almost no chatting-up. Which might be familiar to any other physics students out there. But one thing I did notice was how the subject is just filled to the brim with innuendoes. It seemed that every way I looked, there were hot, dense bodies, fully degenerate limits, or just… references to wet and dry friction. So I wrote a whole bunch of physics based chat-up lines… more as a kind of ironic “Haha I’m going to die alone” type exercise than as a genuine attempt to attract people. And then ended up having to deliver them in a speech to a room filled with tutors and students...

Anyway, this would have been just another side-note in a life filled with tragicomic events. Except I still had all the chat-up lines, lurking in a dark and musty corner of my computer. And I still had a whole bunch of physics knowledge, lurking in a dark and musty corner of my brain. And I wanted to demonstrate to the world that I’ve got the moves, as well as the looks. And I thought, maybe, just maybe, some of you out there are trying to seduce physicists, and you could use a little help, or you’re trying to learn physics, and you could use a little light relief. So in this podcast, I’m going to explain some ideas about physics using my chat-up lines. This will combine my four great passions in life: awful puns, awful flirting, awful physics, and blathering endlessly on about stuff that no-one could possibly be interested in.

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