Sean Jaehne is creating Pop Up Shops | Food Truck Scheduling
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HEART ATTACK KID

In early Fall 2012, the same year I was to graduate from the University of Houston’s Bauer College of Business, I suddenly had a near fatal heart attack after a midterm test and during a routine visit to the campus recreational (gym) center. Unknown to me at the time, I was born with a congenital heart disease know as ARVD. Essentially it is cancer of the heart, though it is only destructive of cardiac tissue. 

I was lucky though to say the least, as this rare disease is usually a silent killer where a person’s first symptom is also their last. My case was further unusual as I was a top-level track and cross-country athlete from 7th grade to my 2nd year of college. In theory, I wasn’t suppose to have survived high school with such a deadly, and undetectable disease, while being such a competitive athlete.Some of my unfortunate peers with this disease become quite famous after collapsing and dying on the football field without any warning there was something wrong. Fortunate enough to survive, I do have to face the fact my disease is progressive; the harder my heart rate, the faster it spreads.

However, there is a more important miracle to this story than just my mere survival though. I somehow finished my last semester classes without attending classes, studying in the hospital, and making the makeup tests to finalize my grades. My college graduation, and Christmas for that matter, was spent in the hospital bed of Methodist Hospital in the Med Center here in my hometown. It was that time, however, that I would meet my cardiologist who’d save my life and change it for the better as well.

Before that, I was in-and-out of the hospital without any cure pr any clue from he doctors what was wrong. I was grateful to still be alive, but before the end of the year I was unable to stand up for more than a few minutes without a small heart attack manifesting. You see, ARVD is a disease that progressively consumes the cardiac tissue. Since the cardiac tissue is the only self-conducting tissue in the body (meaning it produces its own electrical contractions in order to pump), the deteriorating tissue causes an electrical problem where most heart attack issues are caused by age and blockage (a plumbing problem). In short, I lost control of my life, everything was turned upside down, and I was being forced to face a bedridden-life not of my choosing. 

These problems were compounded by the ending of my longest, most significant relationship with someone who I lived with for the last three years. I didn’t ever think my life would turn into one of the tragedy story most of us just see one TV. I went from being an average healthy youth, to someone having heart attacks weekly. I cried and cursed everything to be honest. I dropped to the bottom when I was ready to loose my faith in God and in living the rest of this life. It was only my parents who kept me from actually acting on anything. When I looked at them and their sorrow for me, ironically I became less concerned over my well-being and more concerned of their’s.

It was somewhere around that lowest point I’ve been where I determined I wasn’t living for me so much as J was for them. I renewed my faith with prayer, and slowly my life saw one opportunity after another arise. Though life still challenged me to earn each of those opportunities as they came. My unanticipated heart stability came in the form of my Methodist cardiologist, Dr. Amish Dave. The single most significant person in my life, Dr. Dave is the one who officially diagnosed me with ARVD. All doctors before him were stumped, and simply just heavily medicated me for preventing my severe arrhythmia (270 bpm at one point). 

Though this doesn’t get into every dramatic detail I went through, what’s important is Dr. Dave’s last procedure with me during May 2013 was what gave me a new lease on life. It’s not any kind of permanent solution, as that doesn’t exist yet for ARVD, but it is as normal as I’ve ever been since before my first heart attack. It is a bit more detailed than this, but essentially what he did was cauterize the disease tissue’s perimeter to slow it progression. Though I feel something a little bit each day, I am living a near normal life again. 

My biggest depression I deal with it now though is being a financial burden onto my elderly parents. Though I know they would never consider me a burden, I know that’s what it is when you take on your son’s medical care and medical expenses. To make things worse is I have a brother who absolutely could care less about their well-being, as my niece became adopted by my parents to salvage his responsibilities. All of this ways heavy on me, but it drives me everyday to reach financial success as soon as possible in order to save them from their children’s plight upon them.

MY SUCCESS

Here comes the most interesting part of my story; life ironically changed for the better compared to when I was “normal” and unaware of my disease. To give you better context, I was the most shy person ever. Whether meeting new people, presenting class projects, or courting girls, I was completely diseased-ridden in my own making of embarrassment. I wouldn’t turn red; I would turn purple! 

I knew that “disease” was crippling me both socially and potentially professionally after graduation. I luckily was employed at the County Clerk’s Office, but it was the most mundane routine imaginable. I felt like I was facing a professional life of complacency being I had (forgive my crudeness) “no balls” in life! However, my real disease would change all that.

After going through what I did, and still do, I came out so string and so unafraid that I can give speeches to hundreds without a flinch. That most trying time of my life so far has allowed me to pursue a real entrepreneurial trajectory I retain to this day. I initially pursued web development, as I like the idea of creating ideas in a virtual space almost without limits. A real business was produced yet, but I was taken on valuable skill sets that are a part of my self made career to this day. It came about 2 years later in mid 2015 that I would find a calling.

Food trucks suddenly came of interest when a family friend informed me of their plight in managing city requirements and regulations. Additionally, food trucks struggled finding locations to operate at. The solution I found was something unique by l leveraging my web development knowledge and applying to an online scheduling company for both properties and food trucks to interact with. I would create the online infrastructure for those two parties to interact with and produce rotations of hundreds of food trucks among hundreds of locations in one city. That template I wished to progress around the nation under the banner of Food Truck Spaces.

MY FAILURE 

Unfortunately, success came at a cost. Being a sole proprietor with a service that grew so fast caused a managerial overload. My health always being sensitive, I still had to manage tolerable stress levels. I then made perhaps my biggest mistake, but all criticisms are in hindsight, of acquiring two partners I thought I needed. They are a husband and wife who are just a little bit older than I. They were presented as cordial, professional, and driven. Seemingly they were my perfect partners, but I would eventually see their plan to commandeer my already successful company unfold after they had enough leverage and relations with my built up client relations.

These two were very proficient in their takeover; they convince me that rebuilding my service with their developers would be best, that I sign a non-compete with my own company, an dthat I agree that no salary is taken until their investment (of the new site) was completely paid off. So their new system cut off communication between myself and my entirely-now, handed over client base. They controlled all the company emails, while keeping me in the dark for a few months to build my ignorance and frustration. They began making it so I would be alienated and decide to eventually leave the company. Their best tactic in that was financial starvation; as I agreed to not take financially compensate before their investment was paid off, it didn’t protect me if they kept reinvesting to keep it from ever being paid off.

Their tactics were working and I was increasingly in a desperate situation. Forced against the wall, I found some refuge in scheduling tabletop vendors (the kinds you find at farmers markets) at locations, as this didn’t break our non-compete clause. Seeing that I wasn’t going out quick enough, they offered to buy me out. I was ready to accept just to re-establish new operations without them, but I had no capital to begin. They never offered me fair compensation for my equity, but they made it worse by negotiating that I would take even less if they wanted me to have the 3 year non-compete waived. I felt played, and technically I was, but I wasn’t going to let people like that win.

Though I took a measly $7500 for my 51% equity, from a company I built that was earning $30K per month under my sole proprietorship, I was free again. That is essentially were I am today, September 2018 and two months removed from my beloved Food Truck Spaces. However, I do believe I came out stronger, or at least my resolve to compete did. I founded Pop Shop Spaces in order to schedule both tabletop vendors and food trucks to locations wanting my services. 

It has been immensely hard to restart with almost no capital, but I am doing it. The biggest difference now is, where before I didn’t have competition with my innovative business, now I have to compete with my former company. They certainly have still attempted to keep me small and as irrelevant as possible. The worst attack came when they almost caused the termination of my friend’s job at a prominent property management company by writing an email to her boss insinuating she took money from me in order to get rights controlling their property’s food truck scheduling. An untrue claim I trued to defend by stating, “if I didn’t get paid by my own company, certainly nobody else did.” Though I got her job secured in that appeal, I didn’t get any future rights to be their service provider. 

All of their efforts to destroy or disrupt me I can say “that’s just business, and I was too trusting of people.” However, they know my health situation, and more importantly my desire to salvage my parents 

MY REVIVAL

As hard as it has been loosing what I built for the last three years, I feel what I am coming up with now is so much more robust and innovative. Beyond scheduling food trucks, as well as beyond scheduling tabletop vendors, I am cooperating with farmers in order to bring something unique to locations that has yet to be seen. I don’t wish to reveal too much, but the essential purpose here is to create a conduit for small, local businesses to grow and make customers by the opening of locations my services provide. Participating vendors will make more money, while their customers will save money and be shopping local.

My hope in adding a Patreon account is to share my story and hopefully gain stranger support in my entrepreneurial efforts for reconstruction. I know in my heart (no pun intended) I will succeed, but my fear is how long. Moving a turtle pace is no benefit to my aging parents who maintain full-time jobs to take care of myself and my niece. Again, my real goal is to retire them now, and personally support my 8 year old niece. With patron support, I can get there faster. My hope is that my story speaks to you not for my sake, but for all our parent’s sake. I can bank on most of you reading this can attest that our parents spoiled us, in particular Baby Boomers spoiling Millennials where I fall under. I am doing this for them, not for me to live the lifestyle of the rich-and-famous. That is a life I cannot enjoy even if I wanted to, given my heart, and given my remaining time of stability in that regard. I think my real message here is, “good can always come from disparity; if we’re not using our pain to grow, we are just letting it kill us.”

Thank you all for reading this, and sharing this story with others is just as valuable to me in my opinion.
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Patreon supporters will receive written-mention on our website that is publicly accessible to all we provide services to. All supporters will receive optional newsletters for updates and company achievements.


Mentions will be  hosted on:

www.popshopspaces.com

www.chasethefoodtrucks.com

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1 of 3
HEART ATTACK KID

In early Fall 2012, the same year I was to graduate from the University of Houston’s Bauer College of Business, I suddenly had a near fatal heart attack after a midterm test and during a routine visit to the campus recreational (gym) center. Unknown to me at the time, I was born with a congenital heart disease know as ARVD. Essentially it is cancer of the heart, though it is only destructive of cardiac tissue. 

I was lucky though to say the least, as this rare disease is usually a silent killer where a person’s first symptom is also their last. My case was further unusual as I was a top-level track and cross-country athlete from 7th grade to my 2nd year of college. In theory, I wasn’t suppose to have survived high school with such a deadly, and undetectable disease, while being such a competitive athlete.Some of my unfortunate peers with this disease become quite famous after collapsing and dying on the football field without any warning there was something wrong. Fortunate enough to survive, I do have to face the fact my disease is progressive; the harder my heart rate, the faster it spreads.

However, there is a more important miracle to this story than just my mere survival though. I somehow finished my last semester classes without attending classes, studying in the hospital, and making the makeup tests to finalize my grades. My college graduation, and Christmas for that matter, was spent in the hospital bed of Methodist Hospital in the Med Center here in my hometown. It was that time, however, that I would meet my cardiologist who’d save my life and change it for the better as well.

Before that, I was in-and-out of the hospital without any cure pr any clue from he doctors what was wrong. I was grateful to still be alive, but before the end of the year I was unable to stand up for more than a few minutes without a small heart attack manifesting. You see, ARVD is a disease that progressively consumes the cardiac tissue. Since the cardiac tissue is the only self-conducting tissue in the body (meaning it produces its own electrical contractions in order to pump), the deteriorating tissue causes an electrical problem where most heart attack issues are caused by age and blockage (a plumbing problem). In short, I lost control of my life, everything was turned upside down, and I was being forced to face a bedridden-life not of my choosing. 

These problems were compounded by the ending of my longest, most significant relationship with someone who I lived with for the last three years. I didn’t ever think my life would turn into one of the tragedy story most of us just see one TV. I went from being an average healthy youth, to someone having heart attacks weekly. I cried and cursed everything to be honest. I dropped to the bottom when I was ready to loose my faith in God and in living the rest of this life. It was only my parents who kept me from actually acting on anything. When I looked at them and their sorrow for me, ironically I became less concerned over my well-being and more concerned of their’s.

It was somewhere around that lowest point I’ve been where I determined I wasn’t living for me so much as J was for them. I renewed my faith with prayer, and slowly my life saw one opportunity after another arise. Though life still challenged me to earn each of those opportunities as they came. My unanticipated heart stability came in the form of my Methodist cardiologist, Dr. Amish Dave. The single most significant person in my life, Dr. Dave is the one who officially diagnosed me with ARVD. All doctors before him were stumped, and simply just heavily medicated me for preventing my severe arrhythmia (270 bpm at one point). 

Though this doesn’t get into every dramatic detail I went through, what’s important is Dr. Dave’s last procedure with me during May 2013 was what gave me a new lease on life. It’s not any kind of permanent solution, as that doesn’t exist yet for ARVD, but it is as normal as I’ve ever been since before my first heart attack. It is a bit more detailed than this, but essentially what he did was cauterize the disease tissue’s perimeter to slow it progression. Though I feel something a little bit each day, I am living a near normal life again. 

My biggest depression I deal with it now though is being a financial burden onto my elderly parents. Though I know they would never consider me a burden, I know that’s what it is when you take on your son’s medical care and medical expenses. To make things worse is I have a brother who absolutely could care less about their well-being, as my niece became adopted by my parents to salvage his responsibilities. All of this ways heavy on me, but it drives me everyday to reach financial success as soon as possible in order to save them from their children’s plight upon them.

MY SUCCESS

Here comes the most interesting part of my story; life ironically changed for the better compared to when I was “normal” and unaware of my disease. To give you better context, I was the most shy person ever. Whether meeting new people, presenting class projects, or courting girls, I was completely diseased-ridden in my own making of embarrassment. I wouldn’t turn red; I would turn purple! 

I knew that “disease” was crippling me both socially and potentially professionally after graduation. I luckily was employed at the County Clerk’s Office, but it was the most mundane routine imaginable. I felt like I was facing a professional life of complacency being I had (forgive my crudeness) “no balls” in life! However, my real disease would change all that.

After going through what I did, and still do, I came out so string and so unafraid that I can give speeches to hundreds without a flinch. That most trying time of my life so far has allowed me to pursue a real entrepreneurial trajectory I retain to this day. I initially pursued web development, as I like the idea of creating ideas in a virtual space almost without limits. A real business was produced yet, but I was taken on valuable skill sets that are a part of my self made career to this day. It came about 2 years later in mid 2015 that I would find a calling.

Food trucks suddenly came of interest when a family friend informed me of their plight in managing city requirements and regulations. Additionally, food trucks struggled finding locations to operate at. The solution I found was something unique by l leveraging my web development knowledge and applying to an online scheduling company for both properties and food trucks to interact with. I would create the online infrastructure for those two parties to interact with and produce rotations of hundreds of food trucks among hundreds of locations in one city. That template I wished to progress around the nation under the banner of Food Truck Spaces.

MY FAILURE 

Unfortunately, success came at a cost. Being a sole proprietor with a service that grew so fast caused a managerial overload. My health always being sensitive, I still had to manage tolerable stress levels. I then made perhaps my biggest mistake, but all criticisms are in hindsight, of acquiring two partners I thought I needed. They are a husband and wife who are just a little bit older than I. They were presented as cordial, professional, and driven. Seemingly they were my perfect partners, but I would eventually see their plan to commandeer my already successful company unfold after they had enough leverage and relations with my built up client relations.

These two were very proficient in their takeover; they convince me that rebuilding my service with their developers would be best, that I sign a non-compete with my own company, an dthat I agree that no salary is taken until their investment (of the new site) was completely paid off. So their new system cut off communication between myself and my entirely-now, handed over client base. They controlled all the company emails, while keeping me in the dark for a few months to build my ignorance and frustration. They began making it so I would be alienated and decide to eventually leave the company. Their best tactic in that was financial starvation; as I agreed to not take financially compensate before their investment was paid off, it didn’t protect me if they kept reinvesting to keep it from ever being paid off.

Their tactics were working and I was increasingly in a desperate situation. Forced against the wall, I found some refuge in scheduling tabletop vendors (the kinds you find at farmers markets) at locations, as this didn’t break our non-compete clause. Seeing that I wasn’t going out quick enough, they offered to buy me out. I was ready to accept just to re-establish new operations without them, but I had no capital to begin. They never offered me fair compensation for my equity, but they made it worse by negotiating that I would take even less if they wanted me to have the 3 year non-compete waived. I felt played, and technically I was, but I wasn’t going to let people like that win.

Though I took a measly $7500 for my 51% equity, from a company I built that was earning $30K per month under my sole proprietorship, I was free again. That is essentially were I am today, September 2018 and two months removed from my beloved Food Truck Spaces. However, I do believe I came out stronger, or at least my resolve to compete did. I founded Pop Shop Spaces in order to schedule both tabletop vendors and food trucks to locations wanting my services. 

It has been immensely hard to restart with almost no capital, but I am doing it. The biggest difference now is, where before I didn’t have competition with my innovative business, now I have to compete with my former company. They certainly have still attempted to keep me small and as irrelevant as possible. The worst attack came when they almost caused the termination of my friend’s job at a prominent property management company by writing an email to her boss insinuating she took money from me in order to get rights controlling their property’s food truck scheduling. An untrue claim I trued to defend by stating, “if I didn’t get paid by my own company, certainly nobody else did.” Though I got her job secured in that appeal, I didn’t get any future rights to be their service provider. 

All of their efforts to destroy or disrupt me I can say “that’s just business, and I was too trusting of people.” However, they know my health situation, and more importantly my desire to salvage my parents 

MY REVIVAL

As hard as it has been loosing what I built for the last three years, I feel what I am coming up with now is so much more robust and innovative. Beyond scheduling food trucks, as well as beyond scheduling tabletop vendors, I am cooperating with farmers in order to bring something unique to locations that has yet to be seen. I don’t wish to reveal too much, but the essential purpose here is to create a conduit for small, local businesses to grow and make customers by the opening of locations my services provide. Participating vendors will make more money, while their customers will save money and be shopping local.

My hope in adding a Patreon account is to share my story and hopefully gain stranger support in my entrepreneurial efforts for reconstruction. I know in my heart (no pun intended) I will succeed, but my fear is how long. Moving a turtle pace is no benefit to my aging parents who maintain full-time jobs to take care of myself and my niece. Again, my real goal is to retire them now, and personally support my 8 year old niece. With patron support, I can get there faster. My hope is that my story speaks to you not for my sake, but for all our parent’s sake. I can bank on most of you reading this can attest that our parents spoiled us, in particular Baby Boomers spoiling Millennials where I fall under. I am doing this for them, not for me to live the lifestyle of the rich-and-famous. That is a life I cannot enjoy even if I wanted to, given my heart, and given my remaining time of stability in that regard. I think my real message here is, “good can always come from disparity; if we’re not using our pain to grow, we are just letting it kill us.”

Thank you all for reading this, and sharing this story with others is just as valuable to me in my opinion.

Recent posts by Sean Jaehne

Tiers
Recognized Contributor
$5 or more per month 0 patrons
Patreon supporters will receive written-mention on our website that is publicly accessible to all we provide services to. All supporters will receive optional newsletters for updates and company achievements.


Mentions will be  hosted on:

www.popshopspaces.com

www.chasethefoodtrucks.com

Silent Contributor
$5 or more per month 0 patrons
We will keep from mentioning your name, but give you optional access to our newsletter that provides updates and company achievements.