Rumination Galore!
I've always had two disciplinary tracks in mind when conceiving of these tutorials: Cutting and Tailoring. Cutting involves measuring, prepping materials, drafting patterns, chalking on cloth and fitting once the garment is in a state of half-completion. Tailoring is about the actual making of the garment, then passing it back to the cutter for fittings. Whether there are multiple people involved in a tailoring house operation or a single tailor performing both duties single-handedly, the two disciplines still remain separate but mutually exclusive. So, when thinking of laying the building blocks for my drafting track, I began to meditate on this. I would like to examine various systems in my videos, but moreover, I believe explaining the CONCEPTS of drafting, and how it relates to making, is key. If I just drafted something and said, "Alright! This is how to draft!", that would be incomplete. I'm just afraid of scaring people away by going into TMI-mode as I discuss the concepts. I need to plot out how I'm going to do this. There is a very large learning curve from just simply "using a pattern" to drafting your own. Bespoke drafting has always been an evolving science. Heck, there are scores of books dating clear into early 19th century England alone. Not until the turn of the 20th century did anything resembling a form of standardization emerge. Previous to that, drafting systems were as various as RPG dice-rolling systems. I have been witness to many debates on forums about which is the "best" drafting system. Your mileage may vary, but my ultimate opinion is this: the drafting system you choose should reflect the type and style of garment you want to make. This means that if you want to make a Victorian garment, you should use a Victorian drafting system; if you want to draft a 1960's German coat, you would use the appropriate period Rundschau system. They all make similar items, but differ greatly in their approach. This could mean a plethora of tutorials and videos, of course. But, I could imagine any sane backer of my project would agree that in order to teach something, I need to at least have a good working experience in it. To-date I am most familiar with The Tailor and Cutter system circa 1949. So, do I go about attempting to learn every system out there? That's the question. It would take a lifetime of study to do this, but in the meantime I need to start somewhere, or it might be a long time before you see a charge on your debit cards. ;) So, in conclusion, I'm going to start by demonstrating the method that I know best, but I need to make it clear that one cannot apply this system universally to all periods and styles. Moreover, the tailoring methods change with the system. If you cut the cloth a certain way, you need to make it up a certain way. Some items are universal, however. Thus, I believe that if I can convey the underlying concepts, and arrange them properly into an interactive learning track, these things will become apparent.
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