A tale of two Hermits
 
Thought it might be fun to put up these two guys. On the left is the Hermit from Tabula Mundi Tarot, Colores Arcus edition, and on the right, the Hermit from the Rosetta Tarot, Papyrus edition, which has "Hermit" written phonetically in hieroglyphs. 

Both have yod or flame shaped pointed hoods. Both are grey bearded wanderers, and each carry the egg-topped staff and the solar lamp. Both incorporate the colors of the scale: yellowish green, slate grey, green grey, and plum. Virgo's nine wheat stalks show up in each. Both illustrate the diagonal path in some way. 

Yet there are differences too. The path of Tabula Mundi's Hermit is shown descending from Chesed (Mercy) to Tiphareth (Beauty), but reversed as if from the "Adam Kadmon" perspective, or if you are the Hermit.  Rosetta's Hermit has the diagonal path in the normal perspective as if you are looking at the Tree from outside the card, and since the Hermit is walking a winding labyrinth, it is hard to tell if he is ascending or descending. He walks the path above ground, but Tabula's Mundi's Hermit clearly is piercing the fertile crust of earth and going below, carrying his light into the darkness.

One's solar lamp is a globe throwing orbs; the other's lamp is eight sided for Hod, the sephira of Mercury, Virgo's ruler. Tabula Mundi has a Balsamic moon as the Moon card is XVIII and eighteen reduces to nine, the Hermit's number. Rosetta also has an orb in the sky, but here we see the "seed of life" pattern, for the secret seed. 

Both have two other creatures present. In the Rosetta, they are the twin snakes about the staff, creating the caduceus staff of Mercury, Virgo's ruler. Tabula Mundi's Hermit has a single snake around the staff, making it the staff of Asclepius the healer. Interestingly, Asclepius was the son of Apollo, which brings in solar Tiphareth. Asclepius' children were goddesses of things related to Virgo:  Hygieia, a goddess of health and cleanliness; Aceso, of healing; Iaso, of recuperation; Panacea, universal remedy; and also Aglaea, a goddess of beauty, (a name of solar Tipareth) splendor and glory (names of Hod, Mercury's sephira). 

The other creature in Tabula Mundi's Hermit is Cerberus, the three-headed hound that guards the underworld to prevent the dead from leaving. In Crowley's Liber III vel Jugorum, the three heads relate to the powers of control of speech, action, and thought, and Cerberus is said to be "not of Tiphareth without, but of Tiphareth within". Which is perfect for the Hermit, who actually carries the concealed light,or secret seed, within him. 

Here is Crowley's Liber III vel Jugorum, an instruction for the control of speech, action, and thought.  This Liber has a message for the introspective journey. It has Chapters 0 thru III, each with verses 0 thru 3.  

 

0.


0. Behold the Yoke upon the neck of the Oxen! Is it not thereby that the  Field shall be ploughed? The Yoke is heavy, but joineth together them  that are separate — Glory to Nuit and to Hadit, and to Him that hath  given us the Symbol of the Rosy Cross! 

Glory unto the Lord of the Word Abrahadabra, and Glory unto Him that  hath given us the Symbol of the Ankh, and of the Cross within the  Circle! 

1. Three are the Beasts wherewith thou must plough the Field; the  Unicorn, the Horse, and the Ox. And these shalt thou yoke in a triple  yoke that is governed by One Whip. 

2. Now these Beasts run wildly upon the earths and are not easily obedient to the Man. 

3. Nothing shall be said here of Cerberus, the great Beast of Hell that  is every one of these and all of these, even as Athanasius hath  foreshadowed. For this matter (1) is not of Tiphereth without, but Tiphereth within. 

I.


0. The Unicorn is speech. Man, rule thy Speech! How else shalt thou  master the Son, and answer the Magician at the right hand gateway of the  Crown? 

1. Here are practices. Each may last for a week or more. 

(a) Avoid using some common word, such as “and” or “the” or “but”; use a paraphrase. 

(b) Avoid using some letter of the alphabet, such as “t”, or “s”. or “m”; use a paraphrase. 

(c) Avoid using the pronouns and adjectives of the first person; use a paraphrase. 

Of thine own ingenium devise others. 

2. On each occasion that thou art betrayed into saying that thou art  sworn to avoid, cut thyself sharply upon the writs or forearm with a  razor; even as thou shouldst beat a disobedient dog. Feareth not the  Unicorn the claws and teeth of the Lion? 

3. Thine arm then serveth thee both for a warning and for a record. Thou  shalt write down thy daily progress in these practices, until thou art  perfectly vigilant at all times over the least word that slippeth from  thy tongue. 

Thus bind thyself, and thou shalt be for ever free. 

II.


0. The Horse is Action. Man, rule thine Action. How else shalt thou  master the Father, and answer the Fool at the Left Hand Gateway of the  Crown? 

1. Here are practices. Each may last for a week, or more. 

(a) Avoiding lifting the left arm above the waist. 

(b) Avoid crossing the legs.
 

Of thine own ingenium devise others. 

2. On each occasion that thou art betrayed into doing that thou art  sworn to avoid, cut thyself sharply upon the wrist or forearm with a  razor; even as thou shouldst beat a disobedient dog. Feareth not the  Horse the teeth of the Camel? 

3. Thine arm then serveth thee both for a warning and for a record. Thou  shalt write down thy daily progress in these practices, until thou art  perfectly vigilant at all times over the least action that slippeth from  the least of thy fingers. 

Thus bind thyself, and thou shalt be for ever free. 

III.


0. The Ox is Thought. Man, rule thy Thought! How else shalt thou master  the Holy Spirit, and answer the High Priestess in the Middle Gateway of  the Crown? 

1. Here are practices. Each may last for a week or more. 

(a) Avoid thinking of a definite subject and all things connected with  it, and let that subject be one which commonly occupies much of thy  thought, being frequently stimulated by sense-perceptions or the  conversation of others. 

(b) By some device, such as the changing of thy ring from one finger to  another, create in thyself two personalities, the thoughts of one being  within entirely different limits from that of the other, the common  ground being the necessities of life. (2) 

Of thine own Ingenium devise others. 

2. On each occasion that thou art betrayed into thinking that thou art  sworn to avoid, cut thyself sharply upon the wrist or forearm with a  razor; even as thou shouldst beat a disobedient dog. Feareth not the Ox  the Goad of the Ploughman? 

3. Thine arm then serveth thee both for a warning and for a record. Thou  shalt write down thy daily progress in these practices, until thou art  perfectly vigilant at all times over the least thought that ariseth in  thy brain. 

Thus bind thyself, and thou shalt be for ever free. 

footnotes to Liber III vel Jugorum:

 (1)  (i.e. the matter of Cereberus).  (2)  For instance, let A be a man of strong passions,  skilled in the Holy Qabalah, a vegetarian, and a keen “reactionary”  politician. Let B be a bloodless and ascetic thinker, occupied with  business and family cares, an eater of meat, and a keen progressive  politician. Let no thought proper to “A” arise when the ring is on the  “B” finger, and vice versa.