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Weekly Content Selection #90
This week I continued working on the physical elevation map of my area, leaving my usual population data research projects at the side for now. I continued to colour in lakes by my own classification system and elevation by colour. Mentally, I've been better this week and I'm looking forward to doing some volunteering in my community in the new year.

As I've been working on the map, I've continued to find some small discrepancies between the map sheets that I've stitched together. One of them east of the problematic Elliot Lake map sheet I will have to pay special attention to. I continued to work around the Elliot Lake map sheet as I'm still uncertain how to address the issue of this one sheet being in metric while the rest of the sheets are in imperial. You can clearly see how I've been working around this sheet in the screenshot included in this post, there's a blank rectangular area in the lower right. 

I've also continued to record observations as I've been working on the map. While I've been doing this, I've been wondering how exactly glaciation has carved the surface of this area in such an erratic way. I've also been wondering how exactly so many lakes have ended up with lake charr in them. I read into these questions and found that although many details are uncertain, it is likely that regarding the lake charr, they evolved during the ice age and as the glaciers retreated, they left massive temporary lakes that covered much of the area now covered in smaller lake charr lakes. As these giant lakes continued to recede, the lake charr deposited into the land depressions carved out by the glaciers and have continued to inhabit them to this day.

I've also been wondering about esker formation and why the northern area analyzed on my map has more eskers than the southern area. Along with the eskers, in the northern area there are also more land depressions not completely filled with water. I'm uncertain regarding the origins of these too, but I'm hypothesizing that they are related to glaciation as they are more commonly found close to eskers. Perhaps since the eskers are glacial aggregate deposits, the area around them is more permeable for water to drain out.

I've been thinking of expanding the map northward to cover the entirety of the District of Algoma since there is just a bit more to the north. I'm also excited to do more work on the eastern map that I stitched together weeks ago but haven't had the time to work on since I've been working on this map. Particularly, on the eastern map I'm interested in analyzing the mineral rich mining region of Sudbury since it is an anomaly in some ways. I'm also looking into stitching together a map of the sheets to the west of my current map. Ultimately, I would like to stitch all of these maps together, but since it would result in such a large map, I'm uncertain if it would be practical. 

I plan on eventually releasing the map that I've been working on as a part of my article, "Algoma's Great Lakes Drainage Basin: Streams and Waterbodies", which you can find on my website. Both this map and the article cover the same area. For the eastern and western maps, I might make an article for each. 

This past week I also went through some of my older photos on my hard drive. There are a number of photos that I've never posted of some of the areas analyzed in my map projects. I haven't put any up yet, but I'm hoping to over the next little while. 

This week I continued to cycle for commuting and exercise purposes. I'm hoping to get out for a few more adventures soon, weather permitting. 

As always, thank you SO much for your continued support! It helps me be able to be who I am and continue to do what I do.

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By becoming a patron, you'll instantly unlock access to 92 exclusive posts
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Links
60
Writings