Ryan Veeder is creating Text Adventure Computer Games
35

patrons

$155
per text adventure computer game
I have been writing text adventures since 2011. I get a kick out of it. I love building worlds; I love hiding things for you to find in those worlds; I love telling stories; I really love telling stories in the bizarre asynchronous conversation format of text parsers. It's ridiculous.

Games I have written include Taco Fiction (which won IFComp in 2011), The Horrible Pyramid (which won EctoComp in 2013), and Captain Verdeterre's Plunder (which won a XYZZY Award for Best Individual NPC in 2013). Also I have written a bunch of other games.

I plan to keep on making games, and releasing them to play for free, until I run out of ideas. With your support, I can pursue some of my more ambitious ideas—contrivances too dumb to pursue on a hobbyist's budget.

And, in return for your support, I can let you in on secrets.
Tiers
Pledge $1 or more per text adventure computer game
13 patrons
SECRET TWITTER FEED: If you follow me on Twitter because you want to hear all about the text adventures I'm writing and learn the details of my creative process, then you are probably disappointed, because on Twitter I mostly talk about Nintendo games.

I don't like talking about game development in public. In private, though, I can post all the process-specific or spoilerrific thoughts and gripes that you crave. At this patron-reward level (and all higher patron-reward levels, blah blah blah), you will be given access to a Secret Twitter Feed in which I cut loose and probably post a lot of sketches of maps.

You'll need a Twitter account to view it, though. You know how Twitter works.
Pledge $5 or more per text adventure computer game
6 patrons
SECRET GAME EXPERIENCES: This patron-reward level appears, on its surface, to reward its patrons with the chance to play early builds of my games and give feedback on them. "Pff!" you think to yourself. "He wants people to pay him for the privilege of doing beta testing for him. What cheek!"

That is the correct reaction, given the information that you have available. But unbeknownst to you, this patron-reward level also rewards its patrons with access to at least one game that I do not plan to release publicly. My reasons for doing this are mysterious.
Pledge $7 or more per text adventure computer game
16 patrons
SECRET CODE: If you really like my games, you will (probably) be pleased to know that there is stuff in them that you (probably) haven't found yet. That's what's so great about parser games! You have no idea what's in there. I value this mystery highly, to a degree indicated by the dollar amount near this paragraph.

This patron-reward level entitles its patrons to annotated editions of the source code text to various older games of mine, to be released at roughly the same time as new games (one hopes). As of this writing I've already annotated most of the source of Taco Fiction. There are so many jokes in there that no player ever saw—but you could have them pointed out to you, by me.
Goals
$75 – reached! per text adventure computer game
While I was working on a game called Someone Keeps Moving My Chair there was an extra feature I wanted to add, but didn't, because it would have cost more than I could justify spending on the development of this fairly slight and extremely self-indulgent game. This goal stands in honor of that goal, and declares in a loud voice: If we reach this Milestone Goal, I will not go back and add that feature to Someone Keeps Moving My Chair, but I will do something equally impractical with a future game.
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I have been writing text adventures since 2011. I get a kick out of it. I love building worlds; I love hiding things for you to find in those worlds; I love telling stories; I really love telling stories in the bizarre asynchronous conversation format of text parsers. It's ridiculous.

Games I have written include Taco Fiction (which won IFComp in 2011), The Horrible Pyramid (which won EctoComp in 2013), and Captain Verdeterre's Plunder (which won a XYZZY Award for Best Individual NPC in 2013). Also I have written a bunch of other games.

I plan to keep on making games, and releasing them to play for free, until I run out of ideas. With your support, I can pursue some of my more ambitious ideas—contrivances too dumb to pursue on a hobbyist's budget.

And, in return for your support, I can let you in on secrets.

Recent posts by Ryan Veeder

Tiers
Pledge $1 or more per text adventure computer game
13 patrons
SECRET TWITTER FEED: If you follow me on Twitter because you want to hear all about the text adventures I'm writing and learn the details of my creative process, then you are probably disappointed, because on Twitter I mostly talk about Nintendo games.

I don't like talking about game development in public. In private, though, I can post all the process-specific or spoilerrific thoughts and gripes that you crave. At this patron-reward level (and all higher patron-reward levels, blah blah blah), you will be given access to a Secret Twitter Feed in which I cut loose and probably post a lot of sketches of maps.

You'll need a Twitter account to view it, though. You know how Twitter works.
Pledge $5 or more per text adventure computer game
6 patrons
SECRET GAME EXPERIENCES: This patron-reward level appears, on its surface, to reward its patrons with the chance to play early builds of my games and give feedback on them. "Pff!" you think to yourself. "He wants people to pay him for the privilege of doing beta testing for him. What cheek!"

That is the correct reaction, given the information that you have available. But unbeknownst to you, this patron-reward level also rewards its patrons with access to at least one game that I do not plan to release publicly. My reasons for doing this are mysterious.
Pledge $7 or more per text adventure computer game
16 patrons
SECRET CODE: If you really like my games, you will (probably) be pleased to know that there is stuff in them that you (probably) haven't found yet. That's what's so great about parser games! You have no idea what's in there. I value this mystery highly, to a degree indicated by the dollar amount near this paragraph.

This patron-reward level entitles its patrons to annotated editions of the source code text to various older games of mine, to be released at roughly the same time as new games (one hopes). As of this writing I've already annotated most of the source of Taco Fiction. There are so many jokes in there that no player ever saw—but you could have them pointed out to you, by me.