Robin Edgar Haworth

is creating Right the Wrong Campaign

1

patron

$27

per To walk from Penticton, BC to Ottawa to to raise awareness
My name is Robin Edgar Haworth, and like everyone, I struggle on a daily basis to meet the challenges of the daily grind, but before I go to sleep I give thanks, knowing tomorrow will be a better day. I have a warm bed to sleep in, coffee for the morning pot, and plenty of candles to keep the darkness at bay. My four-legged friend Koda, an Aussie Shepherd, and myself live a simple but wholesome life, totally off the grid—not even a cell phone or even a clock. I am not the absolute Luddite, for I do own a 25-year-old transistor radio with the dial set to CBC. The sun sets the schedule for work and play, and when I am not at my table working on my art, Koda and I walk the trail of this “place to live forever,” as the Ooknakane people call it, greeting each day with a smile and a prayer of thanks. It's a tranquil little world.

The long darkness of the winter solstice is a good time to ruminate on our lives, reflecting on all things good and right, rejoicing in the blessings bestowed upon us. But life’s cup of goodness is also balanced by its cup of sorrow, the wrongs that also exist. We have to look with clarity at our failures, hidden in the dark, and give them equal consideration. They take us out of our comfort zone, but if we look with a critical eye and open heart, we may be able to see the human potential in ourselves to make change. Each of us is a beacon of light and hope as we are each empowered to make our space a better place.

When I step out of my little world of tranquility, I am saddened by some of the things I see around me. It matters not which direction I look, I can see where some things are not quite right, but I can also see things that are plainly wrong. The greatness of this country will wane away if we do not start to address some of these wrongs and injustices. Fixing these wrongs has always been a struggle, both in seeking a better way, and then in actually rolling up ones sleeves to enact change. If we choose to close our eyes to what’s wrong, or hope it will melt away like the snow in spring, we will only suffer more sorrow in the future.

This coming year is one of choice as we are asked to vote for a leader whom we will empower with the responsibility and resources to correct what might be wrong. As the candidates vie for our votes, we will hear about new spending and promises of a better future. I would ask all who seek our votes not to make big promises for the future or new money for new projects, but to address the present day issues and to put some of the new money toward the underfunded or the ignored existing wrongs in all our communities. From coast to coast to coast, in all parts of this great land, something is in need of repair—if I give you my vote will you use the authority divested in you to create change by righting what is wrong?

If our country and its elected officials continue to procrastinate or ignore the present day needs, we will all suffer, and the shining light that is Canada will glow a little dimmer. It may even be death by 1000 cuts for some, or outright extinction for others. This paints a pretty gloomy picture as I look at the greater world outside my tranquil little bubble, but I can still see the glass as half full. We must start asking the right questions, visualizing the goal, and have the fortitude to make it happen. We cannot and will not give into fear, doubt, or complacency.

I am but one lonely voice in the wilderness, but I believe my concerns are not mine alone. Each and every one of us can work in our communities and see what needs to change. Some of our problems are quite new and can be reversed with a pen stroke, while some of our problems are decades-old and are in need of some major attention and capital. If we continue to go down the road with blinders on and refuse to acknowledge what's holding us back from the true greatness we could be, we all suffer. We cannot leave our problems to the next generation, or just hope they will go away. The inequities we do not fix today in our society will only compound themselves and saddle the future with a bigger capital debt, and with continuing social decay. Do we want our children and grandchildren to be asking why we left them such a broken space?

This coming March 26 marks the beginning of my 63rd year. I've witnessed many changes in our society. For the most part, the changes have been beneficial for the social environment and the human condition, but on the other hand, deeply embedded ideas resistant to change hold us back from our full potential. Change can only come with awareness. Rational exchange and discourse is the first stage in how to create what we wish to achieve. We can continue to ignore the needs of our society and follow those who view the world through rose tinted lenses and suffered the consequences, or we can start a dialogue as the first stage to make change. I do not want to sound like the prophet of doom, but I do want to stimulate conversation that the status quo no longer suffices.

For this reason, my dog Koda and myself will start a journey on foot cross-country to our nation’s capital. I plan to walk almost 5000 km, and stop in the communities along the way to share my concerns for the future. I would like to invite all who are up to the task to join me on this walk, which I have christened, Right the Wrong. Strength in numbers is hard to ignore, and by the time I get to my destination I hope for thousands of like-minded to stand with me on the steps of Parliament, demanding that our elected officials use the power divested in them to act positively to the wishes of the people. If you share any of my concerns, please join me and let your voice be heard. We can leave a better place for our children if we band together, demanding a sustainable and balanced social environment for all in our great land. We can Right the Wrong, let's make it so!

Here is a list of some of the things, in no particular order of importance, that I see that need some attention and real action:

  • Gutting of greenhouse gas and carbon emissions regulations;
  • Muzzling of the scientific community;
  • The lack of clean potable water for many communities;
  • No federal inquiry into the missing or murdered Aboriginal women;
  • Gutting of fisheries research and regulations;
  • Increasing unfairness and difficulty in voting procedures;
  • Need for regulation and inspection of pipeline and rail services;
  • Inadequate equipment and training for the RCMP;
  • Lengthening gap between the rich and poor;
  • No label regulations regarding GMO’s in our food supply;
  • Underfunding for food inspection;
  • Gutting of environmental oversight;
  • The lack of protection for endangered species;
  • Obscene pension plans for MPs;
  • Incarceration of people based on policy, not criminality;
  • Inadequate minimum wage;
  • Lack of an affordable day care system for all families;
  • The Senate, and the gong show that is question period;
  • The aquaculture industry and its effects on wild Pacific salmon;
  • The collapsing infrastructure across the country;
  • Underfunding and other shortfalls of Aboriginal education;
  • The financial cutbacks for our national treasure, the CBC;
  • The cutbacks for home mail delivery;
  • Exporting raw logs instead of processing them in Canada;
  • Corporate welfare and subsidies for large companies;
  • Inadequate funding and medical care for our vets;
  • The talk about having no deficit—but what about the debt? ;
  • High cost of food and basics for northern communities;
  • Lack of affordable housing for all people, including the poor;
  • Long wait lists for people seeking medical care.

I will be leaving on March 26 and will launch from “the Peach” in the city of Penticton in the beautiful Okanagan Valley. I will keep you informed of my preparations for my coming trek between now and departure. There are still a few things to organize, but I hope I will be able to make daily reports of my progress once my journey begins.

Meguetch,
Robin Edgar Haworth

Tiers
Pledge $30 or more per To walk from Penticton, BC to Ottawa to to raise awareness
For $30 (covering a day of my journey) I'll mail you a signed "Right The Wrong" 11 x 17 poster, featuring a reproduction of my original artwork.
Pledge $750 or more per To walk from Penticton, BC to Ottawa to to raise awareness
For $750 receive a limited edition high quality reproduction of one of my original pen and ink drawings, 32 x 22 inches. You can view the artwork available here: https://www.mgallerybook.com/artist/robin-edgar-haworth/
Pledge $3,000 or more per To walk from Penticton, BC to Ottawa to to raise awareness
only 15 left
For $3000 receive an original 32 x 22 inch pen and ink drawing. You can view the artwork available here: https://www.mgallerybook.com/artist/robin-edgar-haworth/
Goals
$27 of $1,000 per To walk from Penticton, BC to Ottawa to to raise awareness
I need money to purchase a phone and phone plan so I can stay in communication with the public and media, and provide updates on my travels.
1 of 2
My name is Robin Edgar Haworth, and like everyone, I struggle on a daily basis to meet the challenges of the daily grind, but before I go to sleep I give thanks, knowing tomorrow will be a better day. I have a warm bed to sleep in, coffee for the morning pot, and plenty of candles to keep the darkness at bay. My four-legged friend Koda, an Aussie Shepherd, and myself live a simple but wholesome life, totally off the grid—not even a cell phone or even a clock. I am not the absolute Luddite, for I do own a 25-year-old transistor radio with the dial set to CBC. The sun sets the schedule for work and play, and when I am not at my table working on my art, Koda and I walk the trail of this “place to live forever,” as the Ooknakane people call it, greeting each day with a smile and a prayer of thanks. It's a tranquil little world.

The long darkness of the winter solstice is a good time to ruminate on our lives, reflecting on all things good and right, rejoicing in the blessings bestowed upon us. But life’s cup of goodness is also balanced by its cup of sorrow, the wrongs that also exist. We have to look with clarity at our failures, hidden in the dark, and give them equal consideration. They take us out of our comfort zone, but if we look with a critical eye and open heart, we may be able to see the human potential in ourselves to make change. Each of us is a beacon of light and hope as we are each empowered to make our space a better place.

When I step out of my little world of tranquility, I am saddened by some of the things I see around me. It matters not which direction I look, I can see where some things are not quite right, but I can also see things that are plainly wrong. The greatness of this country will wane away if we do not start to address some of these wrongs and injustices. Fixing these wrongs has always been a struggle, both in seeking a better way, and then in actually rolling up ones sleeves to enact change. If we choose to close our eyes to what’s wrong, or hope it will melt away like the snow in spring, we will only suffer more sorrow in the future.

This coming year is one of choice as we are asked to vote for a leader whom we will empower with the responsibility and resources to correct what might be wrong. As the candidates vie for our votes, we will hear about new spending and promises of a better future. I would ask all who seek our votes not to make big promises for the future or new money for new projects, but to address the present day issues and to put some of the new money toward the underfunded or the ignored existing wrongs in all our communities. From coast to coast to coast, in all parts of this great land, something is in need of repair—if I give you my vote will you use the authority divested in you to create change by righting what is wrong?

If our country and its elected officials continue to procrastinate or ignore the present day needs, we will all suffer, and the shining light that is Canada will glow a little dimmer. It may even be death by 1000 cuts for some, or outright extinction for others. This paints a pretty gloomy picture as I look at the greater world outside my tranquil little bubble, but I can still see the glass as half full. We must start asking the right questions, visualizing the goal, and have the fortitude to make it happen. We cannot and will not give into fear, doubt, or complacency.

I am but one lonely voice in the wilderness, but I believe my concerns are not mine alone. Each and every one of us can work in our communities and see what needs to change. Some of our problems are quite new and can be reversed with a pen stroke, while some of our problems are decades-old and are in need of some major attention and capital. If we continue to go down the road with blinders on and refuse to acknowledge what's holding us back from the true greatness we could be, we all suffer. We cannot leave our problems to the next generation, or just hope they will go away. The inequities we do not fix today in our society will only compound themselves and saddle the future with a bigger capital debt, and with continuing social decay. Do we want our children and grandchildren to be asking why we left them such a broken space?

This coming March 26 marks the beginning of my 63rd year. I've witnessed many changes in our society. For the most part, the changes have been beneficial for the social environment and the human condition, but on the other hand, deeply embedded ideas resistant to change hold us back from our full potential. Change can only come with awareness. Rational exchange and discourse is the first stage in how to create what we wish to achieve. We can continue to ignore the needs of our society and follow those who view the world through rose tinted lenses and suffered the consequences, or we can start a dialogue as the first stage to make change. I do not want to sound like the prophet of doom, but I do want to stimulate conversation that the status quo no longer suffices.

For this reason, my dog Koda and myself will start a journey on foot cross-country to our nation’s capital. I plan to walk almost 5000 km, and stop in the communities along the way to share my concerns for the future. I would like to invite all who are up to the task to join me on this walk, which I have christened, Right the Wrong. Strength in numbers is hard to ignore, and by the time I get to my destination I hope for thousands of like-minded to stand with me on the steps of Parliament, demanding that our elected officials use the power divested in them to act positively to the wishes of the people. If you share any of my concerns, please join me and let your voice be heard. We can leave a better place for our children if we band together, demanding a sustainable and balanced social environment for all in our great land. We can Right the Wrong, let's make it so!

Here is a list of some of the things, in no particular order of importance, that I see that need some attention and real action:

  • Gutting of greenhouse gas and carbon emissions regulations;
  • Muzzling of the scientific community;
  • The lack of clean potable water for many communities;
  • No federal inquiry into the missing or murdered Aboriginal women;
  • Gutting of fisheries research and regulations;
  • Increasing unfairness and difficulty in voting procedures;
  • Need for regulation and inspection of pipeline and rail services;
  • Inadequate equipment and training for the RCMP;
  • Lengthening gap between the rich and poor;
  • No label regulations regarding GMO’s in our food supply;
  • Underfunding for food inspection;
  • Gutting of environmental oversight;
  • The lack of protection for endangered species;
  • Obscene pension plans for MPs;
  • Incarceration of people based on policy, not criminality;
  • Inadequate minimum wage;
  • Lack of an affordable day care system for all families;
  • The Senate, and the gong show that is question period;
  • The aquaculture industry and its effects on wild Pacific salmon;
  • The collapsing infrastructure across the country;
  • Underfunding and other shortfalls of Aboriginal education;
  • The financial cutbacks for our national treasure, the CBC;
  • The cutbacks for home mail delivery;
  • Exporting raw logs instead of processing them in Canada;
  • Corporate welfare and subsidies for large companies;
  • Inadequate funding and medical care for our vets;
  • The talk about having no deficit—but what about the debt? ;
  • High cost of food and basics for northern communities;
  • Lack of affordable housing for all people, including the poor;
  • Long wait lists for people seeking medical care.

I will be leaving on March 26 and will launch from “the Peach” in the city of Penticton in the beautiful Okanagan Valley. I will keep you informed of my preparations for my coming trek between now and departure. There are still a few things to organize, but I hope I will be able to make daily reports of my progress once my journey begins.

Meguetch,
Robin Edgar Haworth

Recent posts by Robin Edgar Haworth

Tiers
Pledge $30 or more per To walk from Penticton, BC to Ottawa to to raise awareness
For $30 (covering a day of my journey) I'll mail you a signed "Right The Wrong" 11 x 17 poster, featuring a reproduction of my original artwork.
Pledge $750 or more per To walk from Penticton, BC to Ottawa to to raise awareness
For $750 receive a limited edition high quality reproduction of one of my original pen and ink drawings, 32 x 22 inches. You can view the artwork available here: https://www.mgallerybook.com/artist/robin-edgar-haworth/
Pledge $3,000 or more per To walk from Penticton, BC to Ottawa to to raise awareness
only 15 left
For $3000 receive an original 32 x 22 inch pen and ink drawing. You can view the artwork available here: https://www.mgallerybook.com/artist/robin-edgar-haworth/