Sam Singleton is creating Brother Sam Reads Colonel Bob
13

patrons

$24
per Downloadable mp3
LISTEN TO GOD IN THE CONSTITUTION FOR FREE AT 1:52 

If you don’t already know Robert G. Ingersoll, Colonel Bob, let me introduce the man they called the Great Agnostic, who, one-hundred and twenty-five years ago, was one of America’s most celebrated public figures. If he were alive today he’d still be ahead of his time. 

I am Sam Singleton. Brother Sam. I make my living putting on one-man theater pieces about life as a nonbeliever. I’ve been at it for years, and have appeared in hundreds of towns, all across the continent, and, truth be told, I am not especially famous. Turns out that billing yourself as an atheist evangelist is not a sure path to super-stardom. But on the chance that that experience may in some small way equip me to give voice to Colonel Bob’s words, I am pleased to make the attempt.

As a writer Colonel Bob was esteemed by such peers as Charles Dickens, George Barnard Shaw, and Walt Whitman. As an activist his admirers included Eugene Debs and Elizabeth Caty Stanton. But it was as an orator that Colonel Bob made his name. Mark Twain said he was the best he’d ever heard.

Colonel Bob could’ve turned his rhetorical skill to demagoguery, or followed his father into the ministry, but he elected to dedicate himself to advancing the idea that humankind alone can meet humankind’s challenges.

I encourage you to read Susan Jacoby’s excellent biography, “The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought,” and to listen to these recordings as an adjunct, or vice versa.

As for why I am doing this, the issues that Colonel Bob returned to time and again are ones that we deal with to this day: religious dogma versus science, God in government, the value of being a good neighbor, a good citizen, a decent human being. I am undertaking this project because it excites my passions for oratory and human rights, history and philosophy. I am doing it for the purely selfish pleasure of reading aloud some of the loveliest language ever committed to the page.

Scratchy wax-cylinder recordings are all we know of Colonel Bob’s voice, aside from the descriptions of people who heard him speak. He must have had a hell of a set of pipes, since he regular addressed crowds of five thousand and more in the days before amplification. I will make no attempt at mimicry, but I will endeavor to convey something of Colonel Bob’s dynamism.

The project could take years. No end-date has been set. I plan to release one recording per week. I’ll be able to get all the way through some of the pieces; others will require serialization. The typical recording will be between fifteen and thirty minutes in length. You can participate right here on Patreon by subscribing for one dollar per installment.

Goals
$1 – reached! per Downloadable mp3
Patrons can vote on which selections to include from the recorded installments previously posted on Patreon once we have reached the $500 mark. The audio book will then be available to Patreon subscribers at a 50% discount, and offered to the general public online and at Sam Singleton appearances. Retail price will probably be $12.
1 of 1
LISTEN TO GOD IN THE CONSTITUTION FOR FREE AT 1:52 

If you don’t already know Robert G. Ingersoll, Colonel Bob, let me introduce the man they called the Great Agnostic, who, one-hundred and twenty-five years ago, was one of America’s most celebrated public figures. If he were alive today he’d still be ahead of his time. 

I am Sam Singleton. Brother Sam. I make my living putting on one-man theater pieces about life as a nonbeliever. I’ve been at it for years, and have appeared in hundreds of towns, all across the continent, and, truth be told, I am not especially famous. Turns out that billing yourself as an atheist evangelist is not a sure path to super-stardom. But on the chance that that experience may in some small way equip me to give voice to Colonel Bob’s words, I am pleased to make the attempt.

As a writer Colonel Bob was esteemed by such peers as Charles Dickens, George Barnard Shaw, and Walt Whitman. As an activist his admirers included Eugene Debs and Elizabeth Caty Stanton. But it was as an orator that Colonel Bob made his name. Mark Twain said he was the best he’d ever heard.

Colonel Bob could’ve turned his rhetorical skill to demagoguery, or followed his father into the ministry, but he elected to dedicate himself to advancing the idea that humankind alone can meet humankind’s challenges.

I encourage you to read Susan Jacoby’s excellent biography, “The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought,” and to listen to these recordings as an adjunct, or vice versa.

As for why I am doing this, the issues that Colonel Bob returned to time and again are ones that we deal with to this day: religious dogma versus science, God in government, the value of being a good neighbor, a good citizen, a decent human being. I am undertaking this project because it excites my passions for oratory and human rights, history and philosophy. I am doing it for the purely selfish pleasure of reading aloud some of the loveliest language ever committed to the page.

Scratchy wax-cylinder recordings are all we know of Colonel Bob’s voice, aside from the descriptions of people who heard him speak. He must have had a hell of a set of pipes, since he regular addressed crowds of five thousand and more in the days before amplification. I will make no attempt at mimicry, but I will endeavor to convey something of Colonel Bob’s dynamism.

The project could take years. No end-date has been set. I plan to release one recording per week. I’ll be able to get all the way through some of the pieces; others will require serialization. The typical recording will be between fifteen and thirty minutes in length. You can participate right here on Patreon by subscribing for one dollar per installment.

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