Micah Elizabeth Scott is creating vids and tools for art engineers
393

patrons

$1,735
per month
Hi. I'm Micah.

I've always interacted with the world by making things, and by taking them apart to understand them. This was my reality. I had a weird childhood, and it was hard for me to connect with other people, but I could make things. It was like I could make my own tiny worlds.

It wasn't really the things themselves that I got attached to. I loved that experience of deeply understanding something, of creating something new. It felt like a kind of motherhood that anyone could experience. I wanted to share that experience with other people.

At a really young age, my dad sparked my interest in electronics and computers, but I quickly got interested in areas that he didn't have expertise in. So I turned to books, but books were expensive and they could be hard to find, and they didn't necessarily go that deep into things. So I learned to teach myself by experimenting.

Most things don't require a lifetime of experience to understand. Most things, you can look at and understand them without having to understand all the pieces because the people who built them didn't necessarily understand all the pieces. To me, this understanding really represents freedom: freedom from a world where other people control and own all the technology around you.

I got inspired by the open source software movement really early on, and I've spent most of the last 15 years making things that are often weird and complicated, but that I can give away for free. I've been lucky enough to create a few things that have been useful to others. For a while, I ran a service that helped other open source developers coordinate their work. I made Fadecandy, a board that helps people make LED art. Most of these projects don't leave any legacy beyond my experiences of creating them and all the things I learn from those experiences.

After haphazardly barely graduating university in Colorado while I was mostly working on my own projects, I moved to California and I got a job in Silicon Valley. I worked on things that were useful to a lot of people, but that internal beauty that had become so important to me was actually being intentionally hidden now. It felt very antithetical to my being to be working in this environment where you tell people not to look too closely at the software you're giving them. I really want to create things where you encourage everything to be dissected and understood. It's a compliment if someone wants to use your work to try to understand the field.

So, after 7 years of working in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, I burned out, I quit my day job, and started trying to find other things that would keep me going. Various things: art projects, software projects, contracting projects and my own things. But the thing that I've found the most enjoyment out of might be creating videos that document the process behind what I do. This takes something that would often be very obscure and hard for me to share, and it lets me communicate in a way that I think can be both educational and engaging.

My favorite things to create are things that other creators will enjoy, because I so enjoy the experience of creating things itself that I want to pass that experience on to other people. I'm often creating my own tools because I push myself to try things that aren't easy yet, then I push myself to give those tools away and make them accessible.

Video has been a really rewarding medium for me because I can really I think effectively share those tiny details that I get so excited about. It makes it easy to really zoom in on a particular part of the experience that I think people might find especially interesting, and to share that in this very carefully prepared way.

So, Patreon, this is how you can help. If you support me then I can spend more time just making things that you want to learn about, making content that really showcases the process, the details behind that part that you love and that I love, and not just making things that are going to be paved over with something else. You'll help me make more videos about electronics, more videos about art, more videos about the process that I go through to take things apart and understand them. More open source tools for making things and for taking them apart.

It's also an experiment in whether I can create tools and inspirational materials that are useful for other weirdos out there like me, who didn't really fit into the normal system and didn't learn about computers from school, but might learn about computers if they had the ability to tinker in the right ways. I think with my particular skills and knowledge I can make something out there that isn't really like anything else you can find.

So, with your help, I can keep making this stuff. I can keep trying to inspire other people who might learn the same way I learn, and most of all help people realize that it's in their power to figure things out no matter what.
Hi. I'm Micah.

I've always interacted with the world by making things, and by taking them apart to understand them. This was my reality. I had a weird childhood, and it was hard for me to connect with other people, but I could make things. It was like I could make my own tiny worlds.

It wasn't really the things themselves that I got attached to. I loved that experience of deeply understanding something, of creating something new. It felt like a kind of motherhood that anyone could experience. I wanted to share that experience with other people.

At a really young age, my dad sparked my interest in electronics and computers, but I quickly got interested in areas that he didn't have expertise in. So I turned to books, but books were expensive and they could be hard to find, and they didn't necessarily go that deep into things. So I learned to teach myself by experimenting.

Most things don't require a lifetime of experience to understand. Most things, you can look at and understand them without having to understand all the pieces because the people who built them didn't necessarily understand all the pieces. To me, this understanding really represents freedom: freedom from a world where other people control and own all the technology around you.

I got inspired by the open source software movement really early on, and I've spent most of the last 15 years making things that are often weird and complicated, but that I can give away for free. I've been lucky enough to create a few things that have been useful to others. For a while, I ran a service that helped other open source developers coordinate their work. I made Fadecandy, a board that helps people make LED art. Most of these projects don't leave any legacy beyond my experiences of creating them and all the things I learn from those experiences.

After haphazardly barely graduating university in Colorado while I was mostly working on my own projects, I moved to California and I got a job in Silicon Valley. I worked on things that were useful to a lot of people, but that internal beauty that had become so important to me was actually being intentionally hidden now. It felt very antithetical to my being to be working in this environment where you tell people not to look too closely at the software you're giving them. I really want to create things where you encourage everything to be dissected and understood. It's a compliment if someone wants to use your work to try to understand the field.

So, after 7 years of working in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, I burned out, I quit my day job, and started trying to find other things that would keep me going. Various things: art projects, software projects, contracting projects and my own things. But the thing that I've found the most enjoyment out of might be creating videos that document the process behind what I do. This takes something that would often be very obscure and hard for me to share, and it lets me communicate in a way that I think can be both educational and engaging.

My favorite things to create are things that other creators will enjoy, because I so enjoy the experience of creating things itself that I want to pass that experience on to other people. I'm often creating my own tools because I push myself to try things that aren't easy yet, then I push myself to give those tools away and make them accessible.

Video has been a really rewarding medium for me because I can really I think effectively share those tiny details that I get so excited about. It makes it easy to really zoom in on a particular part of the experience that I think people might find especially interesting, and to share that in this very carefully prepared way.

So, Patreon, this is how you can help. If you support me then I can spend more time just making things that you want to learn about, making content that really showcases the process, the details behind that part that you love and that I love, and not just making things that are going to be paved over with something else. You'll help me make more videos about electronics, more videos about art, more videos about the process that I go through to take things apart and understand them. More open source tools for making things and for taking them apart.

It's also an experiment in whether I can create tools and inspirational materials that are useful for other weirdos out there like me, who didn't really fit into the normal system and didn't learn about computers from school, but might learn about computers if they had the ability to tinker in the right ways. I think with my particular skills and knowledge I can make something out there that isn't really like anything else you can find.

So, with your help, I can keep making this stuff. I can keep trying to inspire other people who might learn the same way I learn, and most of all help people realize that it's in their power to figure things out no matter what.

Recent posts by Micah Elizabeth Scott