Shava Nerad is creating commentary on the international and american netizen zeitgeist
38

patrons


There are not so many of us who bridge the years and sensibilities from 1964 to today.  This is how I grew up and took off, roots and wings.

My dad worked night security for the Salem-Montgomery march for Dr King and the SCLC, and was a union organizer in his younger years.  By the time I was born he was working on his divinity degree at Oberlin to become a Universalist minister, because the Universalists' focus on social justice in Cleveland had pulled him in.

I sat on the floor in the living room and listened to my dad and his cronies talk media strategy, direct action and so on.  When I was four, I was on a local civil rights march.  A TV broadcaster picked me out as the safe interviewee:  the little white girl in the home-made corduroy pinafore. 

"Why are you here today, little girl?" he asked me.

"I believe we need a more healing dialectic around race issues in this community," I told him, in my tiny piping voice. 

Dead air followed for a few lengthy seconds.  Remember, everything was live in those days.  At which point, I understand, the cameraman saved him by cutting to a commercial. 

I have not stopped being nerdy, disruptive or frank in over five decades since.  One of the blessings of being involuntarily retired is that I no longer am beholden to any organization that I have to represent.  I can speak my mind fully without my opinions "reflecting back" on any group's funding or reputation.  Now I can analyze fully and with great detail what I think regarding the theme and structure of political affairs, and pass that on to you unfiltered.

Usually people like you don't get frank direct opinions from folks like me, because we're kept as advisory to organizations.  But I'm to broken now to be locked in anyone's back room.  The rest of my life is one long "Ask me anything."  And you know, I like that.  It's fresh air.

In addition, there are a number of topics I've been jotting down in Evernote for some time to tackle as time allowed that fall into various series.  My favorites are a whole series of disruptive ideas, ones that will generally turn most peoples' brains inside out before coffee on a Monday morning and keep them spinning into the next few days. 

I want to create projects on the fragility of our financial instruments, which rely way too much on trust and too little on security by design.  In this age of daily reports on breaches and hacks (some of which are by state sponsored agents) we need to have a major overhaul -- and a major overhaul of our attitudes -- about what financial information security means, and how it relates to personal information and personal privacy.  At root, this is political flashfire material -- the elephant in the room in every discussion of encryption, back doors, foreign hackers, privacy and security.

I want to create an e-book on how the cultural divide between civilian and military (and paramilitary -- including law enforcement, justice, and intelligence) culture is killing our society, and some ideas on how to heal this.  And this is from a classic-liberal Army mom, and former military contractor who has worked with pacifist organizations and with the Intelligence Community on friendly terms.  (Has your head exploded yet?)

And finally, I have an exploration I'd like to make with you, which is a project I call "How to Save the World in Your Spare Time."  This is a class I've taught for over fifteen years now, and I've never been able to put it into a portable curriculum that others can teach. 

So I want to find a set of people -- teachers, organizers, curricula designers, whomever -- who can work with the pieces I can put out, and create something beautiful out of it, so I don't end up buried without this work passed on.  Because in a couple hours, I can take a room of high schoolers, and turn them into organizers and system thinkers in the civic sphere -- and that's amazing, it's a wonderful thing to watch those lights go on.  It's something that needs to be propagated.  And I need y'all's help.

In 2007, I had to leave the Tor Project due to what seems extremely likely to have been a misdiagnosed stroke.  I was rear ended by a drunk driver in Florida in slow suburban traffic at a stoplight.  I was healthy and in my 40s -- we didn't have much reason to think about stroke.  We went on that evening to eat in Kissimee at a seafood place, but I was getting increasingly sick.  My fiance thought it was food poisoning.

Now, years later, I'm classed as fully disabled, on SSI, often left for weeks at a time confined to bed with nerve pain and a laundry list of problems that are more typical of people who survived strokes half a century ago.  I can still write, but not every day.  I can still speak, but not as well.  I really want to find some way to continue to work, but I can't guarantee deadlines well enough for any one employer to support me.

There is so much left in this life of mine, as limited as it is, that I can still share.  You let me share it with the world.

You are my patrons.  Thank you.
Tiers
Pledge $1 or more per month
Shava's everlasting thanks!
Pledge $50 or more per month
At $50/mo, you get to participate in a weekly(health allowing) interactive streamcast as a tech/politics AMA on the week's news, and a listing as patrons on shava.org (anonymous listings -- of course -- accepted) [disclaimer -- I don't have tech set up for this yet, but I'm working on it!  RSN!]

Pledge $100 or more per month
At $100.00/mo or above you get the AMA as above, plus a link on shava.org with a one line link/profile (right of refusal reserved -- you'd want me to! :)
Goals
38 of 50 patrons
OK, I'll dress up and brush my hair.  Get a green screen.   This amount marks my hitting the maximum that SSI could pay me and my independence from Social Security benefits.  I'll still be disabled, but I won't be begging any more.  I'll throw a damn party, you bet.  At this average (it might change over time), and once I qualify for full medicaid, and if Trump doesn't screw the disabled, I'll be off of SSI entirely.
1 of 4

There are not so many of us who bridge the years and sensibilities from 1964 to today.  This is how I grew up and took off, roots and wings.

My dad worked night security for the Salem-Montgomery march for Dr King and the SCLC, and was a union organizer in his younger years.  By the time I was born he was working on his divinity degree at Oberlin to become a Universalist minister, because the Universalists' focus on social justice in Cleveland had pulled him in.

I sat on the floor in the living room and listened to my dad and his cronies talk media strategy, direct action and so on.  When I was four, I was on a local civil rights march.  A TV broadcaster picked me out as the safe interviewee:  the little white girl in the home-made corduroy pinafore. 

"Why are you here today, little girl?" he asked me.

"I believe we need a more healing dialectic around race issues in this community," I told him, in my tiny piping voice. 

Dead air followed for a few lengthy seconds.  Remember, everything was live in those days.  At which point, I understand, the cameraman saved him by cutting to a commercial. 

I have not stopped being nerdy, disruptive or frank in over five decades since.  One of the blessings of being involuntarily retired is that I no longer am beholden to any organization that I have to represent.  I can speak my mind fully without my opinions "reflecting back" on any group's funding or reputation.  Now I can analyze fully and with great detail what I think regarding the theme and structure of political affairs, and pass that on to you unfiltered.

Usually people like you don't get frank direct opinions from folks like me, because we're kept as advisory to organizations.  But I'm to broken now to be locked in anyone's back room.  The rest of my life is one long "Ask me anything."  And you know, I like that.  It's fresh air.

In addition, there are a number of topics I've been jotting down in Evernote for some time to tackle as time allowed that fall into various series.  My favorites are a whole series of disruptive ideas, ones that will generally turn most peoples' brains inside out before coffee on a Monday morning and keep them spinning into the next few days. 

I want to create projects on the fragility of our financial instruments, which rely way too much on trust and too little on security by design.  In this age of daily reports on breaches and hacks (some of which are by state sponsored agents) we need to have a major overhaul -- and a major overhaul of our attitudes -- about what financial information security means, and how it relates to personal information and personal privacy.  At root, this is political flashfire material -- the elephant in the room in every discussion of encryption, back doors, foreign hackers, privacy and security.

I want to create an e-book on how the cultural divide between civilian and military (and paramilitary -- including law enforcement, justice, and intelligence) culture is killing our society, and some ideas on how to heal this.  And this is from a classic-liberal Army mom, and former military contractor who has worked with pacifist organizations and with the Intelligence Community on friendly terms.  (Has your head exploded yet?)

And finally, I have an exploration I'd like to make with you, which is a project I call "How to Save the World in Your Spare Time."  This is a class I've taught for over fifteen years now, and I've never been able to put it into a portable curriculum that others can teach. 

So I want to find a set of people -- teachers, organizers, curricula designers, whomever -- who can work with the pieces I can put out, and create something beautiful out of it, so I don't end up buried without this work passed on.  Because in a couple hours, I can take a room of high schoolers, and turn them into organizers and system thinkers in the civic sphere -- and that's amazing, it's a wonderful thing to watch those lights go on.  It's something that needs to be propagated.  And I need y'all's help.

In 2007, I had to leave the Tor Project due to what seems extremely likely to have been a misdiagnosed stroke.  I was rear ended by a drunk driver in Florida in slow suburban traffic at a stoplight.  I was healthy and in my 40s -- we didn't have much reason to think about stroke.  We went on that evening to eat in Kissimee at a seafood place, but I was getting increasingly sick.  My fiance thought it was food poisoning.

Now, years later, I'm classed as fully disabled, on SSI, often left for weeks at a time confined to bed with nerve pain and a laundry list of problems that are more typical of people who survived strokes half a century ago.  I can still write, but not every day.  I can still speak, but not as well.  I really want to find some way to continue to work, but I can't guarantee deadlines well enough for any one employer to support me.

There is so much left in this life of mine, as limited as it is, that I can still share.  You let me share it with the world.

You are my patrons.  Thank you.

Recent posts by Shava Nerad

Tiers
Pledge $1 or more per month
Shava's everlasting thanks!
Pledge $50 or more per month
At $50/mo, you get to participate in a weekly(health allowing) interactive streamcast as a tech/politics AMA on the week's news, and a listing as patrons on shava.org (anonymous listings -- of course -- accepted) [disclaimer -- I don't have tech set up for this yet, but I'm working on it!  RSN!]

Pledge $100 or more per month
At $100.00/mo or above you get the AMA as above, plus a link on shava.org with a one line link/profile (right of refusal reserved -- you'd want me to! :)