Siân Louise is creating Change
3

patrons

Thank you for all the support I have had over the years in local and national organising and activism. Many will know me through my writing on gender and class, though writing has previously been only a small part of my work. I have arranged community events to support women and children, created online and offline feminist spaces which are women only for our development, empowerment and advancement. Everything I work on has solidarity at the heart as I oppose charity personally and politically. Patreon is an opportunity for those further from me geographically to show solidarity by supporting the change I create in my world for women and for children, especially for working class families in my community. This is my personal patreon to enable me to continue this work and reduce the hours I spend in paid employment.
Tiers
Dewsbury Woolen Weavers
$1 or more per month
These women went on strike to stop attempts to cut wages by 10%. In 1875. 6 years before suffrage for property owning women was granted in the Isle of Man. 43 years before limited suffrage for British (again property owning) women.


Your solidarity takes their name.

Bryant and May Matchgirls
$5 or more per month
These women went on strike to change their conditions, to fight for their safety and in solidarity with a worker dismissed on or around 2 July 1888. This strike came 7 years after the strike by Dewsbury Woolen Weavers. Both are part of the rich history of working class women's achievements.


Your solidarity takes their name.

Clementina Black
$10 or more per month
Clementina Black as one of only two women delegates at the 1888 Women's Trade Union Council proposed the first TUC equal pay resolution. Her resolution recognised that where women were “employed merely because they were cheaper, all work gradually fell into their hands, … and that this resulted in lower (wages) to the general injury of men and women alike.” 

Your solidarity takes her name.

Cradley Heath Chainmakers
$15 or more per month
In 1910, after a campaign by the anti-sweating league, legislation to address sweating (poverty pay) in four industries, including chainmaking, was introduced. A minimum wage was set for these industries and when employers refused to comply the Cradley Heath chainmakers began their strike. The strike and media campaign led by Mary MacArthur, Julia Varley, Thomas Sitch and Charles Sitch with prominent interviews given by oldest chainmaker Patience Round, ultimately won women and all workers the right to an enforceable minimum wage. In 1910, 88 years before Labour's National Minimum Wage Act.

Your solidarity take their name.

Rolls Royce Hillgton Workers
$20 or more per month
During WWII women were often employed in skilled and semi skilled work they had previously been shut out of. In 1940 it was agreed by the engineering federation that women should receive the same wage as men after 32 weeks in post, but Rolls Royce evaded equal pay until challenged in 1943 by the Amalgamated Engineering Union who agreed a new grading system. It would still leave around 80% of women workers underpaid so 16, 000 women and some men went on strike. After a week they had won a rate of pay for every task at every machine in the factory defined for all workers, woman or man.

Your solidarity take their name.

Bristol Bus Boycotters
$25 or more per month
Increased migrantion in the post war years meant more workers from Black and Asian heritage in the UK. Regardless of experience and education many job skills were barred to these workers. In 1963 the Bristol Omnibus Company colluding with with the Transport and General Workers Union (TGWU) operated a colour bar, allowing only white workers in the higher paid positions on bus crews. West Indians Roy Hackett, Owen Henry, Audley Evans and Prince Brown with their chosen spokesperson Paul Stephenson who was west African challenged the bar using test cases, media attention and a bus boycott. Their work led to Raghbir Singh, a Sikh man, becoming Bristol's first bus conductor who was a person of colour, 17 September 1963. A few days later he was joined by two Jamaicans and two Pakistani men. This work contributed to the passing of the Race Relations Act 1965 and the Race Relations Act 1968.

Your solidarity takes their name.

Dagenham Ford Sewing Machinists
$30 or more per month
In 1968, after their job was re-graded as unskilled, 187 women went on strike. They wanted recognition that their work was skilled and deserved equal pay with men doing skilled work at the same factory. The strike led to their job being re-graded as skilled but also prompted many other equal pay strikes around the country. Ultimately the work of these women led to the passing of the Equal Pay Act 1970
Thank you for all the support I have had over the years in local and national organising and activism. Many will know me through my writing on gender and class, though writing has previously been only a small part of my work. I have arranged community events to support women and children, created online and offline feminist spaces which are women only for our development, empowerment and advancement. Everything I work on has solidarity at the heart as I oppose charity personally and politically. Patreon is an opportunity for those further from me geographically to show solidarity by supporting the change I create in my world for women and for children, especially for working class families in my community. This is my personal patreon to enable me to continue this work and reduce the hours I spend in paid employment.

Recent posts by Siân Louise

Tiers
Dewsbury Woolen Weavers
$1 or more per month
These women went on strike to stop attempts to cut wages by 10%. In 1875. 6 years before suffrage for property owning women was granted in the Isle of Man. 43 years before limited suffrage for British (again property owning) women.


Your solidarity takes their name.

Bryant and May Matchgirls
$5 or more per month
These women went on strike to change their conditions, to fight for their safety and in solidarity with a worker dismissed on or around 2 July 1888. This strike came 7 years after the strike by Dewsbury Woolen Weavers. Both are part of the rich history of working class women's achievements.


Your solidarity takes their name.

Clementina Black
$10 or more per month
Clementina Black as one of only two women delegates at the 1888 Women's Trade Union Council proposed the first TUC equal pay resolution. Her resolution recognised that where women were “employed merely because they were cheaper, all work gradually fell into their hands, … and that this resulted in lower (wages) to the general injury of men and women alike.” 

Your solidarity takes her name.

Cradley Heath Chainmakers
$15 or more per month
In 1910, after a campaign by the anti-sweating league, legislation to address sweating (poverty pay) in four industries, including chainmaking, was introduced. A minimum wage was set for these industries and when employers refused to comply the Cradley Heath chainmakers began their strike. The strike and media campaign led by Mary MacArthur, Julia Varley, Thomas Sitch and Charles Sitch with prominent interviews given by oldest chainmaker Patience Round, ultimately won women and all workers the right to an enforceable minimum wage. In 1910, 88 years before Labour's National Minimum Wage Act.

Your solidarity take their name.

Rolls Royce Hillgton Workers
$20 or more per month
During WWII women were often employed in skilled and semi skilled work they had previously been shut out of. In 1940 it was agreed by the engineering federation that women should receive the same wage as men after 32 weeks in post, but Rolls Royce evaded equal pay until challenged in 1943 by the Amalgamated Engineering Union who agreed a new grading system. It would still leave around 80% of women workers underpaid so 16, 000 women and some men went on strike. After a week they had won a rate of pay for every task at every machine in the factory defined for all workers, woman or man.

Your solidarity take their name.

Bristol Bus Boycotters
$25 or more per month
Increased migrantion in the post war years meant more workers from Black and Asian heritage in the UK. Regardless of experience and education many job skills were barred to these workers. In 1963 the Bristol Omnibus Company colluding with with the Transport and General Workers Union (TGWU) operated a colour bar, allowing only white workers in the higher paid positions on bus crews. West Indians Roy Hackett, Owen Henry, Audley Evans and Prince Brown with their chosen spokesperson Paul Stephenson who was west African challenged the bar using test cases, media attention and a bus boycott. Their work led to Raghbir Singh, a Sikh man, becoming Bristol's first bus conductor who was a person of colour, 17 September 1963. A few days later he was joined by two Jamaicans and two Pakistani men. This work contributed to the passing of the Race Relations Act 1965 and the Race Relations Act 1968.

Your solidarity takes their name.

Dagenham Ford Sewing Machinists
$30 or more per month
In 1968, after their job was re-graded as unskilled, 187 women went on strike. They wanted recognition that their work was skilled and deserved equal pay with men doing skilled work at the same factory. The strike led to their job being re-graded as skilled but also prompted many other equal pay strikes around the country. Ultimately the work of these women led to the passing of the Equal Pay Act 1970