SilentxxBunny is creating memorable and captivating video-games for kids aged 4 - 104.
3
patrons
$9
per month
I've been a Game Designer longer then I can remember... Before I even knew how to write, I was "making my own games" with a pencil and spiral notebooks. Then I learned how to write, and that was helpful. I continued designing games on paper almost daily until I was ten. My dad (patron of 25 years) still has all of those old notebooks.
 
 
2004-2006: 
 
Made with Game Maker 5

 
One fateful afternoon, I came home from school and saw my brother using Game Maker 5. That moment changed my life forever, and took my obsession to the next level.  My first game was called Silver Fire Gathering. It featured a red pac-man on an adventure to collect silver fire, in order to stop "Lord Himo." I didn't know one lick of code, but that didn't matter to me.  Once I got the hang of drag and drop, I made a new level (every day) and would have my brother and sister test them for me. Two months later, Silver Fire Gathering was completely finished, and I was a "real" Game Designer.  My second game was a side-scrolling platformer / RPG with a similar number of levels. Gwindor had six stages, each with it's own boss and a unique theme. It was mostly drag and drop, with a few segments of code I learned in the GameMaker 6 documentation. Every week:  I'd collect flash drives from my Boy Scout troop, and load new levels onto them. 
 
 
2007-2010:  Project Enigma
 
When I was 13 or so, I started my most ambitious project to date: An online multiplayer shooter called Project Enigma.  I wanted to create a game that my friends could play together. One of my best friends (kidbw3) knew how to write GML, and had created a trilogy of Top Down Shooters called "Excalibur War."  The only thing we were missing was was art. I posted a Graphics Request topic on the GameMaker Community (GMC) and we crowd-sourced some original artwork. We received an incredible response from GMC members.  Project Enigma became one of the most popular topics on that board. Countless artists contributed original sprites (with the promise of two exclusive sets of armor.) One was jet black, and the other looked like Captain America (if he was a space-warrior.) We met a developer/composer named bikekid_2222 somewhere along the way. He composed a few original songs, and helped us setup the online functions. Within a year, we had our prototype. The rest is history: We were internet-famous, and we had more money than we knew what to do with. We did what any sensible 14 year olds would do in our situation... Cocaine!  Relax, I’m only joking. Sadly, Project Enigma would never see the light of day. I’ve had a lot of time to reflect on what went wrong, and I think I’ve narrowed it down to a few key problems. First of all, I’m a born perfectionist. I can be more than a bit obsessive. This project was overly ambitious (given our resources, funding, and experience.) 
 
 
2011:  Small Scale Epic | Grid Lock | GMCG
 
During my Senior year:  I released two small games called Small Scale Epic and Grid Lock.  I also worked on one final “complicated mess" of a project called the Game Maker Community Game (GMCG.)
  
 
2014:  Fiat Games | One Game a Week
 
That was about it until 2014. Three years after graduating: I teamed up with kidbw3 once more to attempt the #1GAW (One Game a Week) challenge that we invented. It was inspired by #1GAM (One Game a Month) and a thesis I read about “rapid prototyping.” This experiment lasted for two months, then we had to stop. I got us into a bit of hot water with an art studio. Our blog caught their attention on the fourth week, and they made us an offer we couldn’t refuse (or completely understand.) At first, we were creating (bad) artwork by ourselves, because we were doing this with a $0.00 budget. I was convinced that if we could sell our games to publishers if we had premium artwork, so we decided to move forward. A month later, I was bankrupt and couldn’t afford our weekly payment. (As with any good negotiation, both parties walked away from the table feeling that they had been screwed by the other party.) This was demoralizing to say the least, but we avoided any legal troubles. My friend and I were very, very tired at this point.

 
2015-2019:
 Web Design | Freelancing | The American Dream?
 

Fast forward another five years: Today, I’m a freelance website developer, and I haven’t worked on a game since. I have a few web design clients, and have gotten very good at that sort of thing… but it’s just not the same. I don’t much care for writing code, or web scripting… It’s just something I learned to do out of necessity. My heart and soul aren't in it. My passion is designing games. It’s the only thing that I’ve ever wanted to do.
 
I created this page to ask for assistance raising money to make kick-ass games. If you can spare a dollar or two each month, and you decide to help me fund my career as a Game Designer…  I can't properly explain how grateful I would be.  I guarantee that 92% of your contribution will go towards making games, 8% will go to Patreon for their services, and 0% will be used to buy drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, shoes, fast food, or anything else that makes life wonderful. You are supporting a “one-man game studio” and your contributions will go into a business bank account (separate from my personal finances.)  Thanks for reading!
Tiers
PWYC Support Level
$1 or more per month

I'm asking you to consider a monthly pledge at a level that feels comfortable to you.  You can pledge just $1 per month, or you can pledge more - up to you!  Thanks so much.

Goals
$9 of $241 per month
 
$241.00 is how much it will cost me (total - not monthly) to have the option to publish games to Android, Amazon and iOS mobile appstores. 
 
I'm releasing a new game next month, and would love to release it as a native app. 

Any contributions (even just one dollar) are sincerely appreciated, and will help get me there. Thank you, all. <3
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I've been a Game Designer longer then I can remember... Before I even knew how to write, I was "making my own games" with a pencil and spiral notebooks. Then I learned how to write, and that was helpful. I continued designing games on paper almost daily until I was ten. My dad (patron of 25 years) still has all of those old notebooks.
 
 
2004-2006: 
 
Made with Game Maker 5

 
One fateful afternoon, I came home from school and saw my brother using Game Maker 5. That moment changed my life forever, and took my obsession to the next level.  My first game was called Silver Fire Gathering. It featured a red pac-man on an adventure to collect silver fire, in order to stop "Lord Himo." I didn't know one lick of code, but that didn't matter to me.  Once I got the hang of drag and drop, I made a new level (every day) and would have my brother and sister test them for me. Two months later, Silver Fire Gathering was completely finished, and I was a "real" Game Designer.  My second game was a side-scrolling platformer / RPG with a similar number of levels. Gwindor had six stages, each with it's own boss and a unique theme. It was mostly drag and drop, with a few segments of code I learned in the GameMaker 6 documentation. Every week:  I'd collect flash drives from my Boy Scout troop, and load new levels onto them. 
 
 
2007-2010:  Project Enigma
 
When I was 13 or so, I started my most ambitious project to date: An online multiplayer shooter called Project Enigma.  I wanted to create a game that my friends could play together. One of my best friends (kidbw3) knew how to write GML, and had created a trilogy of Top Down Shooters called "Excalibur War."  The only thing we were missing was was art. I posted a Graphics Request topic on the GameMaker Community (GMC) and we crowd-sourced some original artwork. We received an incredible response from GMC members.  Project Enigma became one of the most popular topics on that board. Countless artists contributed original sprites (with the promise of two exclusive sets of armor.) One was jet black, and the other looked like Captain America (if he was a space-warrior.) We met a developer/composer named bikekid_2222 somewhere along the way. He composed a few original songs, and helped us setup the online functions. Within a year, we had our prototype. The rest is history: We were internet-famous, and we had more money than we knew what to do with. We did what any sensible 14 year olds would do in our situation... Cocaine!  Relax, I’m only joking. Sadly, Project Enigma would never see the light of day. I’ve had a lot of time to reflect on what went wrong, and I think I’ve narrowed it down to a few key problems. First of all, I’m a born perfectionist. I can be more than a bit obsessive. This project was overly ambitious (given our resources, funding, and experience.) 
 
 
2011:  Small Scale Epic | Grid Lock | GMCG
 
During my Senior year:  I released two small games called Small Scale Epic and Grid Lock.  I also worked on one final “complicated mess" of a project called the Game Maker Community Game (GMCG.)
  
 
2014:  Fiat Games | One Game a Week
 
That was about it until 2014. Three years after graduating: I teamed up with kidbw3 once more to attempt the #1GAW (One Game a Week) challenge that we invented. It was inspired by #1GAM (One Game a Month) and a thesis I read about “rapid prototyping.” This experiment lasted for two months, then we had to stop. I got us into a bit of hot water with an art studio. Our blog caught their attention on the fourth week, and they made us an offer we couldn’t refuse (or completely understand.) At first, we were creating (bad) artwork by ourselves, because we were doing this with a $0.00 budget. I was convinced that if we could sell our games to publishers if we had premium artwork, so we decided to move forward. A month later, I was bankrupt and couldn’t afford our weekly payment. (As with any good negotiation, both parties walked away from the table feeling that they had been screwed by the other party.) This was demoralizing to say the least, but we avoided any legal troubles. My friend and I were very, very tired at this point.

 
2015-2019:
 Web Design | Freelancing | The American Dream?
 

Fast forward another five years: Today, I’m a freelance website developer, and I haven’t worked on a game since. I have a few web design clients, and have gotten very good at that sort of thing… but it’s just not the same. I don’t much care for writing code, or web scripting… It’s just something I learned to do out of necessity. My heart and soul aren't in it. My passion is designing games. It’s the only thing that I’ve ever wanted to do.
 
I created this page to ask for assistance raising money to make kick-ass games. If you can spare a dollar or two each month, and you decide to help me fund my career as a Game Designer…  I can't properly explain how grateful I would be.  I guarantee that 92% of your contribution will go towards making games, 8% will go to Patreon for their services, and 0% will be used to buy drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, shoes, fast food, or anything else that makes life wonderful. You are supporting a “one-man game studio” and your contributions will go into a business bank account (separate from my personal finances.)  Thanks for reading!

Recent posts by SilentxxBunny

Tiers
PWYC Support Level
$1 or more per month

I'm asking you to consider a monthly pledge at a level that feels comfortable to you.  You can pledge just $1 per month, or you can pledge more - up to you!  Thanks so much.