SilentxxBunny (Aden)

SilentxxBunny (Aden)

is creating video games for his "inner-child" and yours...

2

patrons

$19

per month
I've been designing games for longer then I can remember... 

Before I even knew how to write, I was "making video games" in spiral notebooks. I continued designing games on paper almost daily until I was ten. My dad (patron of 25 years) still has all of my old notebooks. One fateful afternoon: I came home from the fourth grade, and saw my older brother using "Game Maker 5." That moment changed my life forever, and took my obsession with making games to the next level (pun intended.)
 

 
My first game was called Silver Fire Gathering. It featured a red pac-man on an adventure to collect silver fire, in order to defeat Lord Himo. I made a new level (every single day) and learned GameMaker's "drag and drop" functions as I went. I didn't know one lick of code, but that didn't matter. My younger sister tested each level and helped me imagineer Lord Himo's Castle. A few months later: Silver Fire Gathering was completely finished! I was officially a video-game designer, and the happiest ten year-old on Earth. 
 

 
 
My second game was a side-scrolling RPG with a similar number of levels. Gwindor had six stages, each with it's own boss and a unique theme. It was mostly "drag and drop" with a few snips of code I took from the GameMaker documentation.
 
... both games are lost somewhere in the sands of time
 
 
During my freshman year in high-school: I started working on my most ambitious project to date: A multiplayer shooter called Project Enigma. My goal was to create a game that my friends could play together. A friend-of-a-friend knew how to program, and created a series of games he called the Excalibur War Trilogy. Over the next few years: Bobby wrote most of the game's code and quickly became my BFF. We decided to crowd-source the game's artwork by posting a topic on the GameMaker Community and listed everything we needed to finish the game. We received an incredible response: Project Enigma became one of the most popular topics on the GMC Graphics forum, with dozens of artists contributing original artwork (for the promise of exclusive armor.) Somewhere along the way, we met a composer (Southman) along the way who composed the game's soundtrack, helped with the coding, and became an invaluable member of the team. Within a year we had prototype: Click here to watch a short demo on YouTube.
 
Unfortunately, Project Enigma never saw the light of day... This project was far too ambitious for a team of high-school students to accomplish, within a reasonable amount of time, with a budget of zero-dollars and zero-cents... But it was fun and we learned a lot from the process.
 
 

 
During my sophomore year (2009) I created Small Scale Epic for the YoYoGame "Save the Planet" competition. I didn't win, but my game was featured in SimulatorGM Issue 1. Click here to download Small Scale Epic (Windows only.)
 
 

I created Grid Lock during Junior year (2010.) It took me less than two hours to build (in a "double-period" class that I'd totally checked out from.)
 
A year after graduation (2012) YoYoGames announced the HTML5 export-module for GameMaker, so I converted it into a mobile HTML5 game. Click here to play Grid Lock in any browser, on any device (because HTML5 kicks ass.)
 
HTML5 games were in high-demand at the time, and I was able to sell non-exclusive licenses to three different publishers, and made around a thousand dollars from it. All of the sudden, the HTML5 market became very, very crowded and I had to get a "real job."
 

January 2014:  Bobby and I teamed up once again to attempt the One Game a Week challenge that we (kinda) invented. We were inspired thesis we found on “rapid prototyping” and derived the idea from the One Game a Month challenge.  We made-up a company called Fiat Games and set-up a makeshift-office at my dad's house. 
 
"One Game a Week" only lasted for a couple months... We had to stop because I ran out of money. Originally, we were doing things one-hundred percent in-house (with no budget.) Out of the cold blue nothing: A professional art studio in California contacted me and made an offer that I couldn't refuse (or completely understand.) A month later I was flat-broke, and Fiat Games lost it's momentum... but we made some pretty cool games.

 

 

Present Day... 


Fast-forward another five years: I'm a freelance web designer, and haven't released a new game since Fiat Games shut-down. I created this page hoping to attract sponsors to help fund my new games. All contributions go into a bank account (separate from my personal finances) to buy pretty artwork and expensive code-libraries. My sponsors will receive secret-updates on new games, early-access, and lots of behind-the-scenes nonsense.

Tiers
PWYC Support Level
$1 or more per month

A long, long time ago... This little guy made a promise to himself that he'd be a video game designer when he grew up... I'm doing everything I can to keep my word to him. Your pledges help me make the kind of games that he'd want to play. 


Benefits of Patronage

  • Early access to new games
  • Secret updates
  • Help decide my new games
Goals
2 of 5 patrons
My current goal is to reach 5 patrons (2 more than I have meow.)
1 of 1
I've been designing games for longer then I can remember... 

Before I even knew how to write, I was "making video games" in spiral notebooks. I continued designing games on paper almost daily until I was ten. My dad (patron of 25 years) still has all of my old notebooks. One fateful afternoon: I came home from the fourth grade, and saw my older brother using "Game Maker 5." That moment changed my life forever, and took my obsession with making games to the next level (pun intended.)
 

 
My first game was called Silver Fire Gathering. It featured a red pac-man on an adventure to collect silver fire, in order to defeat Lord Himo. I made a new level (every single day) and learned GameMaker's "drag and drop" functions as I went. I didn't know one lick of code, but that didn't matter. My younger sister tested each level and helped me imagineer Lord Himo's Castle. A few months later: Silver Fire Gathering was completely finished! I was officially a video-game designer, and the happiest ten year-old on Earth. 
 

 
 
My second game was a side-scrolling RPG with a similar number of levels. Gwindor had six stages, each with it's own boss and a unique theme. It was mostly "drag and drop" with a few snips of code I took from the GameMaker documentation.
 
... both games are lost somewhere in the sands of time
 
 
During my freshman year in high-school: I started working on my most ambitious project to date: A multiplayer shooter called Project Enigma. My goal was to create a game that my friends could play together. A friend-of-a-friend knew how to program, and created a series of games he called the Excalibur War Trilogy. Over the next few years: Bobby wrote most of the game's code and quickly became my BFF. We decided to crowd-source the game's artwork by posting a topic on the GameMaker Community and listed everything we needed to finish the game. We received an incredible response: Project Enigma became one of the most popular topics on the GMC Graphics forum, with dozens of artists contributing original artwork (for the promise of exclusive armor.) Somewhere along the way, we met a composer (Southman) along the way who composed the game's soundtrack, helped with the coding, and became an invaluable member of the team. Within a year we had prototype: Click here to watch a short demo on YouTube.
 
Unfortunately, Project Enigma never saw the light of day... This project was far too ambitious for a team of high-school students to accomplish, within a reasonable amount of time, with a budget of zero-dollars and zero-cents... But it was fun and we learned a lot from the process.
 
 

 
During my sophomore year (2009) I created Small Scale Epic for the YoYoGame "Save the Planet" competition. I didn't win, but my game was featured in SimulatorGM Issue 1. Click here to download Small Scale Epic (Windows only.)
 
 

I created Grid Lock during Junior year (2010.) It took me less than two hours to build (in a "double-period" class that I'd totally checked out from.)
 
A year after graduation (2012) YoYoGames announced the HTML5 export-module for GameMaker, so I converted it into a mobile HTML5 game. Click here to play Grid Lock in any browser, on any device (because HTML5 kicks ass.)
 
HTML5 games were in high-demand at the time, and I was able to sell non-exclusive licenses to three different publishers, and made around a thousand dollars from it. All of the sudden, the HTML5 market became very, very crowded and I had to get a "real job."
 

January 2014:  Bobby and I teamed up once again to attempt the One Game a Week challenge that we (kinda) invented. We were inspired thesis we found on “rapid prototyping” and derived the idea from the One Game a Month challenge.  We made-up a company called Fiat Games and set-up a makeshift-office at my dad's house. 
 
"One Game a Week" only lasted for a couple months... We had to stop because I ran out of money. Originally, we were doing things one-hundred percent in-house (with no budget.) Out of the cold blue nothing: A professional art studio in California contacted me and made an offer that I couldn't refuse (or completely understand.) A month later I was flat-broke, and Fiat Games lost it's momentum... but we made some pretty cool games.

 

 

Present Day... 


Fast-forward another five years: I'm a freelance web designer, and haven't released a new game since Fiat Games shut-down. I created this page hoping to attract sponsors to help fund my new games. All contributions go into a bank account (separate from my personal finances) to buy pretty artwork and expensive code-libraries. My sponsors will receive secret-updates on new games, early-access, and lots of behind-the-scenes nonsense.

Recent posts by SilentxxBunny (Aden)

Tiers
PWYC Support Level
$1 or more per month

A long, long time ago... This little guy made a promise to himself that he'd be a video game designer when he grew up... I'm doing everything I can to keep my word to him. Your pledges help me make the kind of games that he'd want to play. 


Benefits of Patronage

  • Early access to new games
  • Secret updates
  • Help decide my new games