Demetrius is creating a team to gather and write up famous blacks' birth data
24

patrons

$65
per month
Autumn 2014, friend and colleague Samuel F. Reynolds co-created International Society of Black Astrologers (ISBA) in response to Ferguson. And otherwise to locate and connect more black astrologers with one another.

In tandem to ISBA's creation, I observed AstroDatabank.com - perhaps the world's best and largest birth data set - has only tagged some of its entrants as African-American (AfAm) or Black. Some of those entries have since been updated accordingly, while a good few others need similar updates. And still, a great number of black names are absent from AstroDatabank. For example, multi-talented Grammy-award winner Jill Scott is not entered whatsoever, yet her six year old son Jett is. Superstar Janet Jackson is entered, though with two different birth times.

All of this got me thinking: have m/any famous black folks even been ASKED for their actual birth data (time, date and place)? Is this an opportunity to give both #astrology AND #blacklivesmatter greater visibility? And why haven't more people - black and otherwise - been asked for their birthdata with so many ways these days to ask them?!

Seemingly they have not been asked. And there is a great opportunity here to show how astrology is useful in one's life journey using famous folk's stories as examples for others to observe.

All that in my mind, the idea to pull together this project, Starshine 2020, emerged. This project aims to collect quality birthdata for at least 2,000 famous living black people through calendar year 2020. Each person collected will receive a write up formatted for inclusion on astrology wikis. Some entrants will receive a year ahead forecast written about them on a blog post  that will be pushed out through social media.

Noting black here includes all people of African descent, whether they're from the U.K., Japan, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean or certainly Africa itself. Of course, black also includes African-Americans. Idris Elba, for example, is Afro-British or such, not African-American. Likewise with singer-actress Rihanna or the iconic Grace Jones can be considered Afro-Caribbean.

To foster commitment and quality, plus gauge interest from both a general audience and the astrological community worldwide, this community project is being crowdfunded. Initial results and experiences will be shared in a live presentation at ISAR's 2016 Symposium in Costa Mesa, CA.   

Writing up this project proposal, presentation, and Patreon pitch page leaves me wondering — what if U.S. Senator and rising politician Barack Obama had been asked for, and shared, his birth time with a requesting astrologer well before all the birther hoopla. How might that have been helpful to him, and to the often under appreciated usefulness of astrology.

[cover image by Priya Kale of Cosmic Diaries]
Tiers
Candle
$1 or more per month 10 patrons
Be named as a supporter on project website.
Lantern
$3 or more per month 11 patrons
Be named AND linked on project's website. Receive inside scoop email blasts on data collection efforts. Plus all previous rewards.
Sweet street light
$6 or more per month 2 patrons
Receive viewing privileges to our wishlist of famous blacks' birthdata we're still after. Plus all previous rewards.
LED Billboard
$10 or more per month 1 patron
Request a particular name advance in the queue of famous folks being tweeted each month. Plus all previous rewards.
Lucky Star
$21 or more per month 0 patrons
Choose an upcoming forecast subject per writing cycle. Plus all previous rewards.
Goals
$65 of $125 per month
Write and publish astrology forecasts monthly of three celebrities’ upcoming personal new years, plus
  • Utilize one of these Google AdWords offers to promote the blog, its forecasts and this project overall, especially aiming for people of color (PoCs) - $150 one-time
  • Subscribe to Feedly (RSS reader app) for previously free services like unlimited feeds and sets of them, social media posting integration as well as receive new feature of keyword alerts useful for discovered birth certificates, birth notices, recently published (auto)biographies, etc. - $65 annually
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Autumn 2014, friend and colleague Samuel F. Reynolds co-created International Society of Black Astrologers (ISBA) in response to Ferguson. And otherwise to locate and connect more black astrologers with one another.

In tandem to ISBA's creation, I observed AstroDatabank.com - perhaps the world's best and largest birth data set - has only tagged some of its entrants as African-American (AfAm) or Black. Some of those entries have since been updated accordingly, while a good few others need similar updates. And still, a great number of black names are absent from AstroDatabank. For example, multi-talented Grammy-award winner Jill Scott is not entered whatsoever, yet her six year old son Jett is. Superstar Janet Jackson is entered, though with two different birth times.

All of this got me thinking: have m/any famous black folks even been ASKED for their actual birth data (time, date and place)? Is this an opportunity to give both #astrology AND #blacklivesmatter greater visibility? And why haven't more people - black and otherwise - been asked for their birthdata with so many ways these days to ask them?!

Seemingly they have not been asked. And there is a great opportunity here to show how astrology is useful in one's life journey using famous folk's stories as examples for others to observe.

All that in my mind, the idea to pull together this project, Starshine 2020, emerged. This project aims to collect quality birthdata for at least 2,000 famous living black people through calendar year 2020. Each person collected will receive a write up formatted for inclusion on astrology wikis. Some entrants will receive a year ahead forecast written about them on a blog post  that will be pushed out through social media.

Noting black here includes all people of African descent, whether they're from the U.K., Japan, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean or certainly Africa itself. Of course, black also includes African-Americans. Idris Elba, for example, is Afro-British or such, not African-American. Likewise with singer-actress Rihanna or the iconic Grace Jones can be considered Afro-Caribbean.

To foster commitment and quality, plus gauge interest from both a general audience and the astrological community worldwide, this community project is being crowdfunded. Initial results and experiences will be shared in a live presentation at ISAR's 2016 Symposium in Costa Mesa, CA.   

Writing up this project proposal, presentation, and Patreon pitch page leaves me wondering — what if U.S. Senator and rising politician Barack Obama had been asked for, and shared, his birth time with a requesting astrologer well before all the birther hoopla. How might that have been helpful to him, and to the often under appreciated usefulness of astrology.

[cover image by Priya Kale of Cosmic Diaries]

Recent posts by Demetrius

Tiers
Candle
$1 or more per month 10 patrons
Be named as a supporter on project website.
Lantern
$3 or more per month 11 patrons
Be named AND linked on project's website. Receive inside scoop email blasts on data collection efforts. Plus all previous rewards.
Sweet street light
$6 or more per month 2 patrons
Receive viewing privileges to our wishlist of famous blacks' birthdata we're still after. Plus all previous rewards.
LED Billboard
$10 or more per month 1 patron
Request a particular name advance in the queue of famous folks being tweeted each month. Plus all previous rewards.
Lucky Star
$21 or more per month 0 patrons
Choose an upcoming forecast subject per writing cycle. Plus all previous rewards.