The MADE is creating the All-Playable Video Game Museum
19

patrons

$207
per month
The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment is Oakland’s Video Game Museum.

The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment is a non-profit 501c3 located in Oakland, focused on educating the public as to how video games are made. We host free classes for kids on technology skills (programming, art, audio design) as well as community events, exhibitions and lectures about software development and video game history.

In our five year history, we’ve been cutting a completely original path towards both bridging the digital divide, and preserving our digital heritage in a playable and relatable manner. 

As a non-profit, we’re heavily focused on improving the world around us. We’re especially good at bringing together people and children who might never have interacted, otherwise. Our classes and exhibits cross cultural lines and unite visitors in a mutual love of video games.

The first time most kids enter the museum, they are understandably overwhelmed: choosing one game to play out of the over 5,000 in our collection, spanning the era from 1972 to today, can be a daunting task. Fortunately, most parents, these days, have video game memories of their own, and they’re usually ready to suggest their own childhood favorite to their progeny.

This leads to many situations where kids and parents are playing Super Mario Brothers together for the first time. Even more interesting are the times when our visitors are interacting with each other, cross racial, cultural and class lines, by playing together the games they grew up loving. From Madden football, to Pong, to Street Fighter 2 and Pokemon, video games unite us culturally, as a society, just as movies and television have done in the past.

Video games are now a cultural default in our society. Kids grow up with their contemporary video games as cultural touchstones, like Star Wars, or Spartacus, or Archie Bunker. The best part of all this is that we can use this cultural closeness to encourage exploration of computer science and digital arts!

The kids taking our classes today will be applying for jobs in the software industry in the future, and because we’re in Oakland, we have a wide diversity of students. When kids first visit our classes, they tend to unleash a floodgate of creativity. This can be seen in the names they use for the save files of the games they make.

These names are never “Asteroids,” or “Shooting Game.” Instead, they’re things like “Steve’s super awesome exploding cat space game!” Or, “Star adventures with flying basketball-man!” We make it easy for our students to learn digital skills by unlocking the enthusiasm they already have for video games.

In our first four years, we educated 400 students, half of which were minorities or female, or both. In February of 2016, we opened our doors on a brand new location at 3400 Broadway in Oakland, doubling our capacity and giving us a retail window for the first time.In that year since we moved, we’ve hosted another 400 students with the same demographics. We’re on track to greatly increase those numbers in 2017, as well.

We're also working to preserve Habitat, the first graphical MMO game for the C64 from 1986. neohabitat.org

We'd love to have you as a patron. Our yearly budget barely tops $100,000 for our entire 4400 square foot space at 3400 Broadway in Oakland. With your support we can continue to teach kids, and preserve our gaming history.

The MADE is open Saturdays and Sundays, 12 – 6, 3 -9 Fridays and weekdays for events.
Tiers
Support the Basics
$1 or more per month 2 patrons
$1 pays to power all of our LED lighting for a week.
Support the Staff
$3 or more per month 9 patrons
$3 pays for the power, Internet and insurance to accommodate one child for one of our classes.
Support the Space
$10 or more per month 4 patrons
$10 pays for our staff to open the museum for a bit less than an hour.
Goals
$207 of $500 per month
Covers our monthly power bill.
2 of 6
The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment is Oakland’s Video Game Museum.

The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment is a non-profit 501c3 located in Oakland, focused on educating the public as to how video games are made. We host free classes for kids on technology skills (programming, art, audio design) as well as community events, exhibitions and lectures about software development and video game history.

In our five year history, we’ve been cutting a completely original path towards both bridging the digital divide, and preserving our digital heritage in a playable and relatable manner. 

As a non-profit, we’re heavily focused on improving the world around us. We’re especially good at bringing together people and children who might never have interacted, otherwise. Our classes and exhibits cross cultural lines and unite visitors in a mutual love of video games.

The first time most kids enter the museum, they are understandably overwhelmed: choosing one game to play out of the over 5,000 in our collection, spanning the era from 1972 to today, can be a daunting task. Fortunately, most parents, these days, have video game memories of their own, and they’re usually ready to suggest their own childhood favorite to their progeny.

This leads to many situations where kids and parents are playing Super Mario Brothers together for the first time. Even more interesting are the times when our visitors are interacting with each other, cross racial, cultural and class lines, by playing together the games they grew up loving. From Madden football, to Pong, to Street Fighter 2 and Pokemon, video games unite us culturally, as a society, just as movies and television have done in the past.

Video games are now a cultural default in our society. Kids grow up with their contemporary video games as cultural touchstones, like Star Wars, or Spartacus, or Archie Bunker. The best part of all this is that we can use this cultural closeness to encourage exploration of computer science and digital arts!

The kids taking our classes today will be applying for jobs in the software industry in the future, and because we’re in Oakland, we have a wide diversity of students. When kids first visit our classes, they tend to unleash a floodgate of creativity. This can be seen in the names they use for the save files of the games they make.

These names are never “Asteroids,” or “Shooting Game.” Instead, they’re things like “Steve’s super awesome exploding cat space game!” Or, “Star adventures with flying basketball-man!” We make it easy for our students to learn digital skills by unlocking the enthusiasm they already have for video games.

In our first four years, we educated 400 students, half of which were minorities or female, or both. In February of 2016, we opened our doors on a brand new location at 3400 Broadway in Oakland, doubling our capacity and giving us a retail window for the first time.In that year since we moved, we’ve hosted another 400 students with the same demographics. We’re on track to greatly increase those numbers in 2017, as well.

We're also working to preserve Habitat, the first graphical MMO game for the C64 from 1986. neohabitat.org

We'd love to have you as a patron. Our yearly budget barely tops $100,000 for our entire 4400 square foot space at 3400 Broadway in Oakland. With your support we can continue to teach kids, and preserve our gaming history.

The MADE is open Saturdays and Sundays, 12 – 6, 3 -9 Fridays and weekdays for events.

Recent posts by The MADE

Tiers
Support the Basics
$1 or more per month 2 patrons
$1 pays to power all of our LED lighting for a week.
Support the Staff
$3 or more per month 9 patrons
$3 pays for the power, Internet and insurance to accommodate one child for one of our classes.
Support the Space
$10 or more per month 4 patrons
$10 pays for our staff to open the museum for a bit less than an hour.