Tyler Bryant is creating music.
70

patrons

$643
per month
It all started in first grade when the music teacher popped in a VHS of Elvis Presley. It didn’t take long for the phrase “identity crisis” to start being thrown around. Just because a kid has his mom dye his hair black, wears a gold jacket, and writes ELVIS PRESLEY on all his papers doesn’t mean that he has an identity crisis. Ok... I had an identity crisis and was devastated when I was forced to realize that I was not the King. I’ve spent the rest of my life trying to make Tyler cool.
I got lucky one day at Holly Bond’s music store in Paris, TX when I crossed paths with a man name Roosevelt Twitty. I was eleven years old and was mesmerized by a Lightnin’ Hopkins style blues that he was playing in the corner of the shop. Almost instantly, the hook was in deep. He asked me if I liked the blues. I remember thinking, “If what you’re doing is the blues, then the answer is YES.” After hearing him play for a few brief moments I knew that there was an immense amount of joy to be found in music. I had a dirt bike that went up for sale the next day and I went back to the music store to put an electric guitar on lay away. He was in there again and told me, “If you want to learn to play the blues, I’ll teach you.”
I took him up on that. Thank God.
I remember that he’d pick me up from school and we'd listen to John Lee Hooker on the drive from Honey Grove to Paris, TX where he lived. We'd sit in his dimly lit living room and listen to blues records and watch live concert footage of guys like Bobbie “Blue” Bland while eating cold salami sandwiches. He played me B.B. King for the first time, as well as so many other artists that have changed my life. He taught me the importance of sharing music. It's made for that. Mr. Twitty poured gasoline on a spark that Elvis had started and I became obsessed with any sound that made me feel something. I'd wake up every morning and get completely lost in my favorite albums. I'd lay in bed and listen to Alan Haynes "Live at the Big Easy" and close my eyes and pretend I was there at the show. I felt like I was.
As I started to become a better player, Mr. Twitty and I started playing out wherever and whenever people would have us. The Paris News named us the Blues Buddies and it stuck. We were both surprised when we got paid $92 a piece after playing our music at a cafe in Roxton, Texas. We didn't do it for the money. We did it because it made us happy!
He passed on to me what his Uncle Lonnie passed on to him and I consider that gift of music one of the most precious things I’ve ever received.
Fast forward to fifteen year old me. I saw the Black Crowes for the first time at the Palladium Ballroom in Dallas and had the realization that rock and roll was just the blues with longer hair and more distortion. I was changed yet again. Mr. Twitty’s health wasn’t allowing him to get out and play as much, so I figured it might be time to begin dabbling with the dark arts of distortion, flare pants, and Marshall half stacks. I did my rock and roll homework over the next few years just as I had done with the blues.
When I turned seventeen, I knew it was time to move to a city where I could start a band. There weren't many players floating around my country town of 1,700 people.
I fudged my way through my junior year of high school but was one credit shy of being able to graduate early. I couldn’t bear the thought of wasting away in school for another year when I knew what I was meant to be doing. I enrolled in an online class, convinced my parents that I’d find a way to graduate and would never ask them for money, and set my sights on Nashville, TN.
Looking back, I was totally the stereotypical long haired dreamer barreling down 1-40 with my guitars, my records, and my favorite t-shirts. I was moving to “Music City” to start a band. I figured that whole process would be easier than it turned out to be, but after six months of striking out, I finally got one right over the plate. A friend of a friend recommended that I get together with this “hot shit” drummer named Caleb Crosby from Winchester, KY. Caleb and I instantly got on the same page in a dingy rehearsal room and played our first show a week later at club that was connected to the Palladium that I had seen the Crowes in. Synchronicity, man. Our second show was part of what we called the thirty for thirty tour. We drove fifteen hours in a borrowed Ford Expedition from Nashville to Amarillo to play a thirty minute set supporting REO Speedwagon. Thirty hours of driving for thirty minutes on stage might’ve seemed dumb to most people, but we were LIVING IT UP! We continued to tour that year and after a set supporting Heart in San Antonio, I drove through the night to Honey Grove to enroll in High School the day before graduation. Since I never technically changed my address to Nashville, it worked out and I got a high school diploma after a senior year that consisted of starting what would become Tyler Bryant & the Shakedown.
These days, I spend most of my time and energy on the road or in the studio with the Shakedown. We give everything we’ve got in our live performances and put so much into making our records and giving love to our supporters.
I never feel as alive as I do when I’m on stage with that band and I feel so lucky to be part of it.
Mr. Twitty showed me so much more than music when he said, “Just go for it. Don’t be afraid to mess up.” That gift introduced me to songwriting, my best friends, and showed me well over twenty countries just last year.
It’s what brings me here. On this page, I’ll be sharing the songs that I write that don’t necessarily work for the Shakedown as well as guitar videos that will hopefully serve as an inspiration to some of you with your own playing. Here I will not be confined by genre. I will remember that my first concert was George Straight at TX Stadium. I will be the little kid who was in awe of that many people getting together to celebrate a common thread as well as the man who has been fortunate enough to stand in front of that many people so many times over the last year. This page is for my back bench-seat musings and all of the other moods that come from traveling. This page is for my three chord story songs that you would probably never hear otherwise. Here I will tip my hat to the songs I’ve lived my life to as well as try my best to give you songs to live yours to.
Tiers
STREAM SONGS AND VIDEOS
$1 or more per month 39 patrons
  • Stream songs and videos
THE B-SIDES
$5 or more per month 2 patrons
  • Access to exclusive B-SIDE content
  • Plus all previous rewards
JAM ZONE
$10 or more per month 33 patrons
  • Access and download all Jam Zone backing tracks to practice with. New tracks are added each month.
  • Receive a custom guitar pic in the mail
  • Plus all previous rewards
PERSONALIZED VIDEO MESSAGE
$20 or more per month 5 patrons
  • Personalized video message
  • Plus all previous rewards
GET A PIC AND LETTER IN THE MAIL
$50 or more per month 1 patron
  • I'll mail a custom guitar pic and a thank you note directly to you
  • Plus all previous rewards
HANDWRITTEN LYRICS AND MORE
$100 or more per month 2 patrons
  • I'll write out the lyrics to a song of your choice
  • Plus all previous rewards
It all started in first grade when the music teacher popped in a VHS of Elvis Presley. It didn’t take long for the phrase “identity crisis” to start being thrown around. Just because a kid has his mom dye his hair black, wears a gold jacket, and writes ELVIS PRESLEY on all his papers doesn’t mean that he has an identity crisis. Ok... I had an identity crisis and was devastated when I was forced to realize that I was not the King. I’ve spent the rest of my life trying to make Tyler cool.
I got lucky one day at Holly Bond’s music store in Paris, TX when I crossed paths with a man name Roosevelt Twitty. I was eleven years old and was mesmerized by a Lightnin’ Hopkins style blues that he was playing in the corner of the shop. Almost instantly, the hook was in deep. He asked me if I liked the blues. I remember thinking, “If what you’re doing is the blues, then the answer is YES.” After hearing him play for a few brief moments I knew that there was an immense amount of joy to be found in music. I had a dirt bike that went up for sale the next day and I went back to the music store to put an electric guitar on lay away. He was in there again and told me, “If you want to learn to play the blues, I’ll teach you.”
I took him up on that. Thank God.
I remember that he’d pick me up from school and we'd listen to John Lee Hooker on the drive from Honey Grove to Paris, TX where he lived. We'd sit in his dimly lit living room and listen to blues records and watch live concert footage of guys like Bobbie “Blue” Bland while eating cold salami sandwiches. He played me B.B. King for the first time, as well as so many other artists that have changed my life. He taught me the importance of sharing music. It's made for that. Mr. Twitty poured gasoline on a spark that Elvis had started and I became obsessed with any sound that made me feel something. I'd wake up every morning and get completely lost in my favorite albums. I'd lay in bed and listen to Alan Haynes "Live at the Big Easy" and close my eyes and pretend I was there at the show. I felt like I was.
As I started to become a better player, Mr. Twitty and I started playing out wherever and whenever people would have us. The Paris News named us the Blues Buddies and it stuck. We were both surprised when we got paid $92 a piece after playing our music at a cafe in Roxton, Texas. We didn't do it for the money. We did it because it made us happy!
He passed on to me what his Uncle Lonnie passed on to him and I consider that gift of music one of the most precious things I’ve ever received.
Fast forward to fifteen year old me. I saw the Black Crowes for the first time at the Palladium Ballroom in Dallas and had the realization that rock and roll was just the blues with longer hair and more distortion. I was changed yet again. Mr. Twitty’s health wasn’t allowing him to get out and play as much, so I figured it might be time to begin dabbling with the dark arts of distortion, flare pants, and Marshall half stacks. I did my rock and roll homework over the next few years just as I had done with the blues.
When I turned seventeen, I knew it was time to move to a city where I could start a band. There weren't many players floating around my country town of 1,700 people.
I fudged my way through my junior year of high school but was one credit shy of being able to graduate early. I couldn’t bear the thought of wasting away in school for another year when I knew what I was meant to be doing. I enrolled in an online class, convinced my parents that I’d find a way to graduate and would never ask them for money, and set my sights on Nashville, TN.
Looking back, I was totally the stereotypical long haired dreamer barreling down 1-40 with my guitars, my records, and my favorite t-shirts. I was moving to “Music City” to start a band. I figured that whole process would be easier than it turned out to be, but after six months of striking out, I finally got one right over the plate. A friend of a friend recommended that I get together with this “hot shit” drummer named Caleb Crosby from Winchester, KY. Caleb and I instantly got on the same page in a dingy rehearsal room and played our first show a week later at club that was connected to the Palladium that I had seen the Crowes in. Synchronicity, man. Our second show was part of what we called the thirty for thirty tour. We drove fifteen hours in a borrowed Ford Expedition from Nashville to Amarillo to play a thirty minute set supporting REO Speedwagon. Thirty hours of driving for thirty minutes on stage might’ve seemed dumb to most people, but we were LIVING IT UP! We continued to tour that year and after a set supporting Heart in San Antonio, I drove through the night to Honey Grove to enroll in High School the day before graduation. Since I never technically changed my address to Nashville, it worked out and I got a high school diploma after a senior year that consisted of starting what would become Tyler Bryant & the Shakedown.
These days, I spend most of my time and energy on the road or in the studio with the Shakedown. We give everything we’ve got in our live performances and put so much into making our records and giving love to our supporters.
I never feel as alive as I do when I’m on stage with that band and I feel so lucky to be part of it.
Mr. Twitty showed me so much more than music when he said, “Just go for it. Don’t be afraid to mess up.” That gift introduced me to songwriting, my best friends, and showed me well over twenty countries just last year.
It’s what brings me here. On this page, I’ll be sharing the songs that I write that don’t necessarily work for the Shakedown as well as guitar videos that will hopefully serve as an inspiration to some of you with your own playing. Here I will not be confined by genre. I will remember that my first concert was George Straight at TX Stadium. I will be the little kid who was in awe of that many people getting together to celebrate a common thread as well as the man who has been fortunate enough to stand in front of that many people so many times over the last year. This page is for my back bench-seat musings and all of the other moods that come from traveling. This page is for my three chord story songs that you would probably never hear otherwise. Here I will tip my hat to the songs I’ve lived my life to as well as try my best to give you songs to live yours to.

Recent posts by Tyler Bryant

Tiers
STREAM SONGS AND VIDEOS
$1 or more per month 39 patrons
  • Stream songs and videos
THE B-SIDES
$5 or more per month 2 patrons
  • Access to exclusive B-SIDE content
  • Plus all previous rewards
JAM ZONE
$10 or more per month 33 patrons
  • Access and download all Jam Zone backing tracks to practice with. New tracks are added each month.
  • Receive a custom guitar pic in the mail
  • Plus all previous rewards
PERSONALIZED VIDEO MESSAGE
$20 or more per month 5 patrons
  • Personalized video message
  • Plus all previous rewards
GET A PIC AND LETTER IN THE MAIL
$50 or more per month 1 patron
  • I'll mail a custom guitar pic and a thank you note directly to you
  • Plus all previous rewards
HANDWRITTEN LYRICS AND MORE
$100 or more per month 2 patrons
  • I'll write out the lyrics to a song of your choice
  • Plus all previous rewards