We the People are creating The Statue of Equality
1
patron
$1
per creation
A statue of Lady Equality, also known as Usawa (the Swahili word for "Equality"), is envisioned overlooking Montgomery, Alabama — the city where Rosa Parks stood her ground. The Statue of Equality will have facial features of African Humanity, will be silver in color, and will be the exact same height as the copper Statue of Liberty. The Usawa sculptor will evoke the demeanor of a young Harriet Tubman and Rosa Parks. She will have two wings. Her gesture will be at the moment of taking flight, with only a toe on the ground, with her eyes on the horizon, and her hands on her heart. Though of Black appearance, the Statue of Equality will be for all Americans (and even for all of humanity) — just as the Statue of Liberty, though of Caucasian appearance, represents America's and humanity's ideal of liberty for all. Lady Usawa represents the principle that all human beings are created equal. As such, the Statue of Equality is envisioned as the creation of the People. Specifically, as the funding of the pedestal for the Statue of Liberty came from the People, their pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters . . . , the funds for the Statue of Equality will be "offered up" the same way.

"Make me an angel that flies from Montgomery." — John Prine

The expectation is that, as the world came to Montgomery in the ’60’s, rallied behind its bus boycott and Civil Rights Movement — i.e. support flowed in from near and far — this "mighty river" of support waits to flow again on behalf of “liberty and justice/[equality] for all.”

Envision, friends, if you will, the Statue of Liberty passing on, sharing her mighty flame with Usawa, her sister Statue of Equality, with a gesture that can kindle the light at the end of the tunnel, illumine the new dawn.

There are 4 stages in every great work:
First, it is impossible.
Then, it is difficult.
Then, it is committed to.
Then, it is done!

The one who has born the vision of Usawa: 

Originally from southern West Virginia, Travis Henry is a societal artist who lives and works in upstate New York. He strives to clear a pathway for a future where Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity are experienced by all of humanity.

About the artist: 

A humble spirit, Ronald-Michael McDowell was the art teacher, dear friend, and "brother" of Michael Jackson, whose genius he helped fashion. Jackson said of Ronald that he was the one person whom he expected to go farther than himself. 

Ronald McDowell is considered by many to be one of the most inspired artists of our time. He is a painter, an illustrator, a portraitist, a muralist, a sculptor and a poet, who has earned numerous commendations and awards. 

Ronald is known for his life-like pictorials intended to master the range of human emotion and capture the essence of the human spirit. McDowell, having received national notoriety for his artwork over the course of several decades, has earned international acclaim for his sculptures.


Lady Usawa's Realization:

Phase one funding is for the creation of the model, itself. The next steps then follow: 

Step 1: A core group of people form to guide and serve the process. The nationally celebrated artist and sculptor, Ronald McDowell, is prepared to be part of the core group. The core group need not be large. Where 2 or more gather . . . .

Step 2: The core group shares the vision for Usawa, the Statue of Equality, with people they know in Montgomery, who they believe can recognize the vision and are moved to support it;

Step 3: If interest grows, the vision is further shared with the media, as well as church and school leaders, who would share it, in turn, with the black youth of Montgomery. The black youth would be invited to offer up the first round of funding for the creation of the actual sculpture of Usawa, herself, the Statue of Equality: pennies, nickels, dimes . . . . dollars. So that, in the years to come, after the students have stepped on into life, they could bring their children and grandchildren to visit the statue, sharing with them how they provided the initial round of funding. Such accounts, we trust, will inspire the coming generations to thus realize their own dreams. Once the initial round of funding is secured, Montgomery school children, representing all the races, would be invited to offer the second round of funding.

Step 4: On the basis of the first two rounds of actual financial support, the school children — in the hundreds/thousands — would request a meeting, as necessary, with whoever would be involved in granting the creation of such a statue: e.g. government officials, private parties who own the land. Apart from the actual merit of the project, such a show of support by the youth, our future would, we trust, inspire the officials and parties noted to bless the creation of the Statue of Equality. It is anticipated that the statue would draw a mounting stream of visitors to Montgomery from near and far. 

Step 5: Once the approval/blessing has been granted, the next round of support would be invited from school children throughout Alabama, the US, and world-wide. New Hampshire’s leading gubernatorial candidate was enthused by the idea and is prepared to invite New Hampshire school children to lend a hand. The same applies to a growing number of fellow citizens across the country and overseas. As this process unfolds (not dissimilar from crowd-funding efforts such as kickstarter, gofundme, indiegogo), it can be expected that not only will adults lend a hand, but a drug dealer, moved deeply by the project, has already expressed interest in devoting funds from his “habit" toward such a promising vision of the future — Usawa: The Statue of Equality. The point being: Who can imagine the life that such a labor of love will take on?

Step 6: We the People celebrate the erection of Usawa: The Statue of Equality, and with the permission of the donors, dedicate the excess/surplus funds toward a third statue, The Statue of Sister-and-Brotherhood ("Fraternity"), on the west coast: from sea to shining sea.

We invite you to join in the realization of this project, the erection of The Statue of Equality, with a contribution of any size: pennies, nickels, dimes and dollars, friends — as your "fortunes" allow. 
Goals
$1 of $50,000 per creation
For the first phase, the artist will develop the model of the larger statue.
1 of 1
A statue of Lady Equality, also known as Usawa (the Swahili word for "Equality"), is envisioned overlooking Montgomery, Alabama — the city where Rosa Parks stood her ground. The Statue of Equality will have facial features of African Humanity, will be silver in color, and will be the exact same height as the copper Statue of Liberty. The Usawa sculptor will evoke the demeanor of a young Harriet Tubman and Rosa Parks. She will have two wings. Her gesture will be at the moment of taking flight, with only a toe on the ground, with her eyes on the horizon, and her hands on her heart. Though of Black appearance, the Statue of Equality will be for all Americans (and even for all of humanity) — just as the Statue of Liberty, though of Caucasian appearance, represents America's and humanity's ideal of liberty for all. Lady Usawa represents the principle that all human beings are created equal. As such, the Statue of Equality is envisioned as the creation of the People. Specifically, as the funding of the pedestal for the Statue of Liberty came from the People, their pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters . . . , the funds for the Statue of Equality will be "offered up" the same way.

"Make me an angel that flies from Montgomery." — John Prine

The expectation is that, as the world came to Montgomery in the ’60’s, rallied behind its bus boycott and Civil Rights Movement — i.e. support flowed in from near and far — this "mighty river" of support waits to flow again on behalf of “liberty and justice/[equality] for all.”

Envision, friends, if you will, the Statue of Liberty passing on, sharing her mighty flame with Usawa, her sister Statue of Equality, with a gesture that can kindle the light at the end of the tunnel, illumine the new dawn.

There are 4 stages in every great work:
First, it is impossible.
Then, it is difficult.
Then, it is committed to.
Then, it is done!

The one who has born the vision of Usawa: 

Originally from southern West Virginia, Travis Henry is a societal artist who lives and works in upstate New York. He strives to clear a pathway for a future where Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity are experienced by all of humanity.

About the artist: 

A humble spirit, Ronald-Michael McDowell was the art teacher, dear friend, and "brother" of Michael Jackson, whose genius he helped fashion. Jackson said of Ronald that he was the one person whom he expected to go farther than himself. 

Ronald McDowell is considered by many to be one of the most inspired artists of our time. He is a painter, an illustrator, a portraitist, a muralist, a sculptor and a poet, who has earned numerous commendations and awards. 

Ronald is known for his life-like pictorials intended to master the range of human emotion and capture the essence of the human spirit. McDowell, having received national notoriety for his artwork over the course of several decades, has earned international acclaim for his sculptures.


Lady Usawa's Realization:

Phase one funding is for the creation of the model, itself. The next steps then follow: 

Step 1: A core group of people form to guide and serve the process. The nationally celebrated artist and sculptor, Ronald McDowell, is prepared to be part of the core group. The core group need not be large. Where 2 or more gather . . . .

Step 2: The core group shares the vision for Usawa, the Statue of Equality, with people they know in Montgomery, who they believe can recognize the vision and are moved to support it;

Step 3: If interest grows, the vision is further shared with the media, as well as church and school leaders, who would share it, in turn, with the black youth of Montgomery. The black youth would be invited to offer up the first round of funding for the creation of the actual sculpture of Usawa, herself, the Statue of Equality: pennies, nickels, dimes . . . . dollars. So that, in the years to come, after the students have stepped on into life, they could bring their children and grandchildren to visit the statue, sharing with them how they provided the initial round of funding. Such accounts, we trust, will inspire the coming generations to thus realize their own dreams. Once the initial round of funding is secured, Montgomery school children, representing all the races, would be invited to offer the second round of funding.

Step 4: On the basis of the first two rounds of actual financial support, the school children — in the hundreds/thousands — would request a meeting, as necessary, with whoever would be involved in granting the creation of such a statue: e.g. government officials, private parties who own the land. Apart from the actual merit of the project, such a show of support by the youth, our future would, we trust, inspire the officials and parties noted to bless the creation of the Statue of Equality. It is anticipated that the statue would draw a mounting stream of visitors to Montgomery from near and far. 

Step 5: Once the approval/blessing has been granted, the next round of support would be invited from school children throughout Alabama, the US, and world-wide. New Hampshire’s leading gubernatorial candidate was enthused by the idea and is prepared to invite New Hampshire school children to lend a hand. The same applies to a growing number of fellow citizens across the country and overseas. As this process unfolds (not dissimilar from crowd-funding efforts such as kickstarter, gofundme, indiegogo), it can be expected that not only will adults lend a hand, but a drug dealer, moved deeply by the project, has already expressed interest in devoting funds from his “habit" toward such a promising vision of the future — Usawa: The Statue of Equality. The point being: Who can imagine the life that such a labor of love will take on?

Step 6: We the People celebrate the erection of Usawa: The Statue of Equality, and with the permission of the donors, dedicate the excess/surplus funds toward a third statue, The Statue of Sister-and-Brotherhood ("Fraternity"), on the west coast: from sea to shining sea.

We invite you to join in the realization of this project, the erection of The Statue of Equality, with a contribution of any size: pennies, nickels, dimes and dollars, friends — as your "fortunes" allow. 

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