Diary of a Nomadic Chef

Diary of a Nomadic Chef

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what I do

The gastronomic world has changed. When I was younger and got asked what I'd like for dinner, generally the options were, “what type of protein”, and is that served with “potatoes or with pasta”. But now the options are what country would you like to dine.
This new world is a mixing pot of different cultures, where modern cuisine infuses all four corners of the globe. And it is served on the one plate.
For a chef this is an exciting time. But we have to remember that it is the traditional cooking techniques and flavours, that has shaped our gastronomic dreams and fantasies.
Now, I have the question: where does it come from, and what does it really taste like?
To get to the point, “what I do”. I am a chef sailing the world to find those traditional cooking methods and flavours. But as Ralph Waldo Emerson Quoted, “Life is a journey, not a destination”. So let me tell you how I got to this point in my life.

The journey
As children, we're all asked what we’d like to do when we grow up? When all the other kids were saying “a fireman or an astronaut”, I was dreaming of being a chef.
I started my culinary career in 1995 as a kitchen hand in a bakery in a small town north of New Zealand. After a year of water soaked Prune hands, Palmolive soap suds, and enough mince and cheese pies that could last a lifetime. I threw in my brightly coloured rubber apron to seek a more creative journey, and rolled myself into culinary school.

Now fast forward into the future, through many years working in a hot kitchen and sleepless nights, haunting nightmares of the docket printer never stopping. The abusive cry’s of the head chef waiting for me to give the garnish for the next table, but my prep has completely run out. Pots and pans flung at the wash up, like an AWOL SCUD missiles smashing into the sink, splattering smouldering hot purees up the wall.
My pre-service adrenaline driven smile has now turned to a desperate look of failure, my hart drops like a stone, sinking through the weeds, Thinking to my self, “my time in this kitchen is up, I am done for, Im going to be thrown to the dogs in the down time dudgeon of doom”.
This recurring nightmare has been introduced to me through many working nights of reality.
As a chef, when you finally navigate your way through the unromantic labyrinth of stainless steel benches, fried eggs and multicoloured plastic chopping boards. There is an amazing world of camaraderie and creativity.
The long days, sore hands, and stressful service’s, become all worthwhile when the plates come back to the kitchen empty of food, but full of praises. When chefs you stand beside band like brothers, to win a night without a hitch. It’s the creation of edible art. It’s when perfection becomes an all consuming passion. It’s all this that make working as a chef one of the most satisfying accomplishments.
But this is not where it ends, in my case I am passionate about the old traditional flavours, and cooking methods, traditional recipes, is the start middle and end of all modern cuisine, its like the blues in rock and roll, and it would be a shame to forget.


The Destination
Walking the markets in foreign countries. Smell of stagnant mud on the ground,
insects hovering over hanging carcasses. Vendors bartering in fierce competition, yelling over the sound of oversize meat cleavers chopping on wooden blocks.
The vibrant colours of homegrown fruit lined up in perfect uniform on worn bamboo shelving. Alien looking fish from the deep, and animal parts that brings the question to mind, “ What the F#@k is that”? “Should that be eaten”? “If I was to eat that, would it change my D.N.A”?
How can we not be intrigued?
This is the place where a culinary adventure should start. Asking the market vendor with butterflied chicken on bamboo skewers what they are for. Learning about those chillies that will no doubt burn like the fiery pits of hell with tonight’s meal. Talking to the locals at the markets to find the best restaurant and streets eats in town.
It’s the ethnic flavours that has built cultures, the homegrown/hunted product that provided lifestyles, the homely cooking that has given so much identity. Like most, I’m seeking the excitement of those new flavour that will send us to that semi-unconscious food trance, where every bite will become a perfect memory.
Sadly in the new world convenience product is slowly stripping flavours and leaving traditional food empty. M.S.G and ketchup replace fresh tomato, grandma's passed down recipes slowly forgotten, smouldering coal replaced for blue gas flame leaving the flavours empty and smokeless.
I am traveling to find those traditional ingredients and cooking methods that keep the integrity of flavours. Its the passion of a local teaching me their recipe and showing me their culture, that is all inspiring.

If you have read all that you are amazing 
Tiers
Super Star
$10 or more per month

YOU ARE A SUPER STAR. 


Thank you so much for your support! Every little bit helps grow Dairy of a Nomadic Chef.   


In return

  • You will get to see new episodes before anybody else. 
  • Your pledge will also gain you exclusive access to recipes.
  • Full assess to the Facebook forms  


The envorment.


  • Your pledge will alway provide a sanitary household latrine to an underprivileged family in Cambodia. Reducing the incidence of waterborne diseases and help keep sewage out of the ocean 



Super Saiyan Orangutang
$22 or more per month

Wow what can I say you are a bloody legend


In Return

  • You will view episode before any one else.
  • Exclusive assess to recipes shown on this channel 
  • Videos showing you how to cook the recipes 
  • Assess to the A Nomadic Chef Facebook chat




The Envorment 

  • Rebuild the native forest habitat at Tanjung Puting National Park (Central Borneo) to assist in the restoration of endangered wildlife such as the Orangutang
  • Give one family access to clean drinking water in Cambodia for a month 
The Full Hog
$30 or more per month

You my friend are an amazing human being. This pledge will help us grow. ad I thank you from the bottom of my heart.


In Return

  • You will view episode before any one else.
  • Exclusive assess to recipes shown on this channel 
  • Videos showing you how to cook the recipes 
  • Assess to the A Nomadic Chef Facebook chat
  • Behind the senses photos 
  • A 20% discount code on A Nomadic Chef Knife 




The Envorment 

  • Rebuild the native forest habitat at Tanjung Puting National Park (Central Borneo) to assist in the restoration of endangered wildlife such as the Orangutang
  • Give one family access to clean drinking water in Cambodia for a month 
  • Give Sanitary household latrine to an underprivileged family in Cambodia  Reducing the incidence of waterborne diseases and help keep sewage out of the ocean 
what I do

The gastronomic world has changed. When I was younger and got asked what I'd like for dinner, generally the options were, “what type of protein”, and is that served with “potatoes or with pasta”. But now the options are what country would you like to dine.
This new world is a mixing pot of different cultures, where modern cuisine infuses all four corners of the globe. And it is served on the one plate.
For a chef this is an exciting time. But we have to remember that it is the traditional cooking techniques and flavours, that has shaped our gastronomic dreams and fantasies.
Now, I have the question: where does it come from, and what does it really taste like?
To get to the point, “what I do”. I am a chef sailing the world to find those traditional cooking methods and flavours. But as Ralph Waldo Emerson Quoted, “Life is a journey, not a destination”. So let me tell you how I got to this point in my life.

The journey
As children, we're all asked what we’d like to do when we grow up? When all the other kids were saying “a fireman or an astronaut”, I was dreaming of being a chef.
I started my culinary career in 1995 as a kitchen hand in a bakery in a small town north of New Zealand. After a year of water soaked Prune hands, Palmolive soap suds, and enough mince and cheese pies that could last a lifetime. I threw in my brightly coloured rubber apron to seek a more creative journey, and rolled myself into culinary school.

Now fast forward into the future, through many years working in a hot kitchen and sleepless nights, haunting nightmares of the docket printer never stopping. The abusive cry’s of the head chef waiting for me to give the garnish for the next table, but my prep has completely run out. Pots and pans flung at the wash up, like an AWOL SCUD missiles smashing into the sink, splattering smouldering hot purees up the wall.
My pre-service adrenaline driven smile has now turned to a desperate look of failure, my hart drops like a stone, sinking through the weeds, Thinking to my self, “my time in this kitchen is up, I am done for, Im going to be thrown to the dogs in the down time dudgeon of doom”.
This recurring nightmare has been introduced to me through many working nights of reality.
As a chef, when you finally navigate your way through the unromantic labyrinth of stainless steel benches, fried eggs and multicoloured plastic chopping boards. There is an amazing world of camaraderie and creativity.
The long days, sore hands, and stressful service’s, become all worthwhile when the plates come back to the kitchen empty of food, but full of praises. When chefs you stand beside band like brothers, to win a night without a hitch. It’s the creation of edible art. It’s when perfection becomes an all consuming passion. It’s all this that make working as a chef one of the most satisfying accomplishments.
But this is not where it ends, in my case I am passionate about the old traditional flavours, and cooking methods, traditional recipes, is the start middle and end of all modern cuisine, its like the blues in rock and roll, and it would be a shame to forget.


The Destination
Walking the markets in foreign countries. Smell of stagnant mud on the ground,
insects hovering over hanging carcasses. Vendors bartering in fierce competition, yelling over the sound of oversize meat cleavers chopping on wooden blocks.
The vibrant colours of homegrown fruit lined up in perfect uniform on worn bamboo shelving. Alien looking fish from the deep, and animal parts that brings the question to mind, “ What the F#@k is that”? “Should that be eaten”? “If I was to eat that, would it change my D.N.A”?
How can we not be intrigued?
This is the place where a culinary adventure should start. Asking the market vendor with butterflied chicken on bamboo skewers what they are for. Learning about those chillies that will no doubt burn like the fiery pits of hell with tonight’s meal. Talking to the locals at the markets to find the best restaurant and streets eats in town.
It’s the ethnic flavours that has built cultures, the homegrown/hunted product that provided lifestyles, the homely cooking that has given so much identity. Like most, I’m seeking the excitement of those new flavour that will send us to that semi-unconscious food trance, where every bite will become a perfect memory.
Sadly in the new world convenience product is slowly stripping flavours and leaving traditional food empty. M.S.G and ketchup replace fresh tomato, grandma's passed down recipes slowly forgotten, smouldering coal replaced for blue gas flame leaving the flavours empty and smokeless.
I am traveling to find those traditional ingredients and cooking methods that keep the integrity of flavours. Its the passion of a local teaching me their recipe and showing me their culture, that is all inspiring.

If you have read all that you are amazing 

Recent posts by Diary of a Nomadic Chef

Tiers
Super Star
$10 or more per month

YOU ARE A SUPER STAR. 


Thank you so much for your support! Every little bit helps grow Dairy of a Nomadic Chef.   


In return

  • You will get to see new episodes before anybody else. 
  • Your pledge will also gain you exclusive access to recipes.
  • Full assess to the Facebook forms  


The envorment.


  • Your pledge will alway provide a sanitary household latrine to an underprivileged family in Cambodia. Reducing the incidence of waterborne diseases and help keep sewage out of the ocean 



Super Saiyan Orangutang
$22 or more per month

Wow what can I say you are a bloody legend


In Return

  • You will view episode before any one else.
  • Exclusive assess to recipes shown on this channel 
  • Videos showing you how to cook the recipes 
  • Assess to the A Nomadic Chef Facebook chat




The Envorment 

  • Rebuild the native forest habitat at Tanjung Puting National Park (Central Borneo) to assist in the restoration of endangered wildlife such as the Orangutang
  • Give one family access to clean drinking water in Cambodia for a month 
The Full Hog
$30 or more per month

You my friend are an amazing human being. This pledge will help us grow. ad I thank you from the bottom of my heart.


In Return

  • You will view episode before any one else.
  • Exclusive assess to recipes shown on this channel 
  • Videos showing you how to cook the recipes 
  • Assess to the A Nomadic Chef Facebook chat
  • Behind the senses photos 
  • A 20% discount code on A Nomadic Chef Knife 




The Envorment 

  • Rebuild the native forest habitat at Tanjung Puting National Park (Central Borneo) to assist in the restoration of endangered wildlife such as the Orangutang
  • Give one family access to clean drinking water in Cambodia for a month 
  • Give Sanitary household latrine to an underprivileged family in Cambodia  Reducing the incidence of waterborne diseases and help keep sewage out of the ocean