Wikitongues is creating videos of every language in the world.
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Albina and Donawati are from South Kalimantan (Borneo), Indonesia. Their mother tongue Bedinah was recorded for the first time by Kunto Nurcahyoko, our community leader in Indonesia.

Wikitongues is an international volunteer movement to sustain cultural diversity by safeguarding every language in the world. With over a thousand contributors around the world, we’re building a public archive of oral histories in every one of the 7,000 languages spoken and signed today. To date, we’ve recorded videos in nearly 500 languages, many of which are under-resourced and at risk of vanishing from history. For some contributors, like Albina in Borneo, Wikitongues is the first time their languages have been represented on the global stage.

And we’re just getting started. In addition to crowdsourcing the first public archive of every language in the world, we’re committed to equipping people with the tools they need to document, promote, and sustain their languages for future generations. From beginner guides to linguistic documentation to models for community organizing and advocacy, everyone who wants to defend their language deserves access to resources to get it done.

 


Wikitongues Advisor Ghil‘ad Zuckermann is a field linguist and academic advisor to the Barngarla revival, led by activist Harry Dare. Read more in Al Jazeera. [Photo John Power/Al Jazeera]

Sustaining language is central to building a more inclusive world. Just ask Harry Dare, an activist from Australia’s Barngarla community, who has dedicated his life to reviving his people’s lost mother tongue. Until the late 1900s, Australia used the bludgeoning politics of forced assimilation to drive Aboriginal cultures out of existence by eradicating their languages. In the words of one nineteenth-century Australian politician, “The Natives would sooner be civilized if their language was extinct.” For Harry, reviving Barngarla has helped his people reclaim their cultural sovereignty, renewing their spiritual connection with Australia. “You ask any Barngarla person, and they’ll tell you we feel a sense of identity now, knowing we have a language along with our tribal boundaries.”

Building universal access to language preservation would elevate humanity. It would fortify the collective knowledge that benefits us all, whether our mother tongue is English, Mandarin, or Chukchi. In fact, entire fields in science and the humanities are dedicated to unraveling wisdom from the 7,000 ways we speak. Ethnobotanists at the Bronx Botanical Gardens work with communities in Vanuatu, whose knowledge of biodiversity shines through the vocabulary of their languages. Paleolinguists uncover evidence of tectonic events from prehistory, such as the Bering Strait and Bantu migrations, by tracing linguistic change across vast geographies. Sustaining language diversity is the surest way to nurture the wisdom of our astonishingly inquisitive species. It’s our collective responsibility.

Chukchi is an indigenous Siberian language, native to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, Russia’s northwesternmost territory. The Bering Strait Migration is evident in the common origins between Siberian and Alaskan languages.

Few responsibilities are so urgent. Every two weeks, the last native speaker of an endangered language dies and a culture withers away. At the blunt end of economic and political exclusion, the world’s most diverse regions are subject to forced assimilation at historically unprecedented rates. A decentralized approach to linguistic preservation is the only viable path toward sustaining the diversity of humankind, but most people lack the resources to document and teach their languages to their children. We’re working to change that.


Though the Cornish language went extinct in the 18th century, cultural activists revived the language in the 1900s by re-learning it and teaching their children. Elizabeth is one of the ‘new’ native Cornish speakers, leading the fight for government recognition today

History shows that when people have the resources to preserve their languages, they can and often do. In some cases, like Hebrew in the 19th century or the Cornish language today, people can even revive the languages of their ancestors, reclaiming their cultural sovereignty. By backing Wikitongues, you’re supporting hundreds of volunteers around the world who are producing free materials in all 7,000 languages.

Wikitongues is a tapestry of diverse backgrounds, with contributors in dozens of countries around the world. Some volunteers, like Nick Panzarella in Texas, are linguists or linguists-in-training. Others, like Kunto Nurcahyoko in Borneo, are language educators. Others still, like Àdhamh Ó Broin of the Dalriada Scottish community, are grassroots language activists, fighting for the preservation and revival of their mother tongues.

Wikitongues 100% volunteer driven — and the movement to save linguistic diversity cannot thrive on passion alone. We’re a lean organization, but we still have technical costs, as well as expenses for equipment and travel. By supporting Wikitongues, you’re ensuring that our volunteers have what they need to secure the future of every language in the world.
Tiers
Community Supporter
$1 or more per month
Support Wikitongues with $1 per month and gain access to our activity feed. 


  • Learn about what Wikitongues is up to online and offline in more than 70 countries. 
  • Stay up to date on language news and empower yourself with everything you need to know about the movement to sustain language diversity.
Community Supporter Plus
$3 or more per month
Special thanks! 


  • Starting in January 2019, you'll feature as an official donor on Wikitongues.org.
  • Plus previous rewards.
Community Member
$5 or more per month
Get to know us! 


  • Get monthly video updates from Wikitongues volunteers
  • Get exclusive oral history previews. In other words, you’ll see Wikitongues videos before they’re on YouTube!
Goals
32 of 500 patrons

Wikitongues is powered by volunteers, but we still have expenses. Your support will help us cover our fundamental technology costs and keep the virtual lights on. With 500 patrons, we can remove ads from our videos!
1 of 1


Albina and Donawati are from South Kalimantan (Borneo), Indonesia. Their mother tongue Bedinah was recorded for the first time by Kunto Nurcahyoko, our community leader in Indonesia.

Wikitongues is an international volunteer movement to sustain cultural diversity by safeguarding every language in the world. With over a thousand contributors around the world, we’re building a public archive of oral histories in every one of the 7,000 languages spoken and signed today. To date, we’ve recorded videos in nearly 500 languages, many of which are under-resourced and at risk of vanishing from history. For some contributors, like Albina in Borneo, Wikitongues is the first time their languages have been represented on the global stage.

And we’re just getting started. In addition to crowdsourcing the first public archive of every language in the world, we’re committed to equipping people with the tools they need to document, promote, and sustain their languages for future generations. From beginner guides to linguistic documentation to models for community organizing and advocacy, everyone who wants to defend their language deserves access to resources to get it done.

 


Wikitongues Advisor Ghil‘ad Zuckermann is a field linguist and academic advisor to the Barngarla revival, led by activist Harry Dare. Read more in Al Jazeera. [Photo John Power/Al Jazeera]

Sustaining language is central to building a more inclusive world. Just ask Harry Dare, an activist from Australia’s Barngarla community, who has dedicated his life to reviving his people’s lost mother tongue. Until the late 1900s, Australia used the bludgeoning politics of forced assimilation to drive Aboriginal cultures out of existence by eradicating their languages. In the words of one nineteenth-century Australian politician, “The Natives would sooner be civilized if their language was extinct.” For Harry, reviving Barngarla has helped his people reclaim their cultural sovereignty, renewing their spiritual connection with Australia. “You ask any Barngarla person, and they’ll tell you we feel a sense of identity now, knowing we have a language along with our tribal boundaries.”

Building universal access to language preservation would elevate humanity. It would fortify the collective knowledge that benefits us all, whether our mother tongue is English, Mandarin, or Chukchi. In fact, entire fields in science and the humanities are dedicated to unraveling wisdom from the 7,000 ways we speak. Ethnobotanists at the Bronx Botanical Gardens work with communities in Vanuatu, whose knowledge of biodiversity shines through the vocabulary of their languages. Paleolinguists uncover evidence of tectonic events from prehistory, such as the Bering Strait and Bantu migrations, by tracing linguistic change across vast geographies. Sustaining language diversity is the surest way to nurture the wisdom of our astonishingly inquisitive species. It’s our collective responsibility.

Chukchi is an indigenous Siberian language, native to the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug, Russia’s northwesternmost territory. The Bering Strait Migration is evident in the common origins between Siberian and Alaskan languages.

Few responsibilities are so urgent. Every two weeks, the last native speaker of an endangered language dies and a culture withers away. At the blunt end of economic and political exclusion, the world’s most diverse regions are subject to forced assimilation at historically unprecedented rates. A decentralized approach to linguistic preservation is the only viable path toward sustaining the diversity of humankind, but most people lack the resources to document and teach their languages to their children. We’re working to change that.


Though the Cornish language went extinct in the 18th century, cultural activists revived the language in the 1900s by re-learning it and teaching their children. Elizabeth is one of the ‘new’ native Cornish speakers, leading the fight for government recognition today

History shows that when people have the resources to preserve their languages, they can and often do. In some cases, like Hebrew in the 19th century or the Cornish language today, people can even revive the languages of their ancestors, reclaiming their cultural sovereignty. By backing Wikitongues, you’re supporting hundreds of volunteers around the world who are producing free materials in all 7,000 languages.

Wikitongues is a tapestry of diverse backgrounds, with contributors in dozens of countries around the world. Some volunteers, like Nick Panzarella in Texas, are linguists or linguists-in-training. Others, like Kunto Nurcahyoko in Borneo, are language educators. Others still, like Àdhamh Ó Broin of the Dalriada Scottish community, are grassroots language activists, fighting for the preservation and revival of their mother tongues.

Wikitongues 100% volunteer driven — and the movement to save linguistic diversity cannot thrive on passion alone. We’re a lean organization, but we still have technical costs, as well as expenses for equipment and travel. By supporting Wikitongues, you’re ensuring that our volunteers have what they need to secure the future of every language in the world.

Recent posts by Wikitongues

Tiers
Community Supporter
$1 or more per month
Support Wikitongues with $1 per month and gain access to our activity feed. 


  • Learn about what Wikitongues is up to online and offline in more than 70 countries. 
  • Stay up to date on language news and empower yourself with everything you need to know about the movement to sustain language diversity.
Community Supporter Plus
$3 or more per month
Special thanks! 


  • Starting in January 2019, you'll feature as an official donor on Wikitongues.org.
  • Plus previous rewards.
Community Member
$5 or more per month
Get to know us! 


  • Get monthly video updates from Wikitongues volunteers
  • Get exclusive oral history previews. In other words, you’ll see Wikitongues videos before they’re on YouTube!