wortheffort woodworking is creating educational woodworking videos
40

patrons

$93
per YouTube Video

Why you should become a 'wortheffort' Patron

A while back I wrote an article for Popular Woodworking “Hand Tools vs Power Tools for Beginners” ( http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/editors-blog/hand-tools-vs-power-tools-for-beginners) where I postulated that power tools should be eliminated, or at least drastically reduced, for beginning woodworkers. My argument was it is more efficient and effective in a classroom environment, students would get more out of it, teachers would have more opportunities for added learning, and it would offset some of what the modern technological world is losing. Additionally it was more cost effective for districts and in the end it would provide a better product for the work force upon graduation. And for the average home woodworker it’d give them a taste of the hobby without much risk either financially or physically. If they decided to venture deeper via power tool commitment they’d end up with a better understanding of wood, it’s interaction with the cutting edge, and end up with the complementary tools and skill to refine what those machines produce to their whim.  

The obstacle I outlined at the end of the article, and the reason why at that time I was leaning in the hand tool direction but hadn’t jumped whole heartedly yet, was finding the teachers. It had been a long time since the majority of woodworkers did stuff by hand hence most teachers in this area (in fact the certification for the subject in my home state of Texas) focused on production power tools. So making the change would be akin to having today’s technology teachers ditch computer labs in favor of mechanical typewriters.

Over the next year I slowly came to a forehead slapping realization. Woodworking, especially at the beginning level you’d be teaching to middle and high schoolers (or even new adult learners), ain’t that hard. It would be much easier to find expert teachers willing to learn a little woodworking than find expert woodworkers who want to learn to teach. Shoot… most good woodworkers don’t want to teach, they want to make stuff. That’s why they became woodworkers in the first place. Whereas expert teachers…

That was the kernel that led to a refocusing of my media creation starting in 2017. I’m going to write a textbook and create some modern media resources for teachers. Resources that can be also be used by homeschoolers, parents, group leaders, and such. Resources that will take a student thru a linear progression of lessons over a semester or two that teaches basic woodworking skills and relates it to their overall education to show the true value of learning.

In doing so we'll also create a body of work that better communicate with the general public wanting to self-educate and give the more experienced prompts to better communicate their own skills to the uninitiated.

But that is the end result of years of content creation that’ll require more time than I have if I continue working 70-80 markets a year selling stuff I make to subsidize wortheffort's media creation. So for 2017 I’m going to attempt to follow in others example and transition to online commerce with one branch being Patreon (the others being online sales and writing).

The plan is to utilize Patreon much differently than others in this DIY/Craft/Education segment who set up monthly subscriptions.

YouTube is how most people know me as a woodworker. My silent “artsy fartsy” build videos and long-form educational videos have been pretty popular and making them is fun thou time consuming. So for 2017 I plan on focusing only on those two types of videos for YouTube with the long-form educational ones now lining up with the chapters I've outlined for the future textbook. This also means keeping a steady schedule of publishing will be impossible because the long-form videos often times take several weeks longer to produce and videos are not the only income stream I have to work in order to subsidize the textbook creation.
 
While in theory an hour long video is as much content as a multitude of 10 minute videos, marketing wise it’s not the same impression to the public. So instead of a monthly subscription for a weekly video I’m choosing to set Patreon as a little tip jar for each video created. That way if I have to skip a few weeks here and there people won't feel cheated. Also it gives me the freedom to post some videos without putting out the "tip jar". These might be smaller videos that support the overall project but might not obviously fit in the woodworking realm. (I have a cool lecture I'll eventually get to on Diet Coke and Design via mathematics which would fit in this category.) 

And sometimes I might need to do a commercial for something I'm making to sell (have to pay the rent somehow) and that wouldn't be fair to charge patrons for. In 2018 I've also started a "WW'nTip-of-Day" series which are short-form lessons so they will not be "patronized" (i.e. - you aren't charged for them.)

A really cool thing about this type of setup is a person can also set a cap to their monthly donation. So a $3/video donation set to a max of $3/mo. would mean you'd donate for the first video only whereas a $1/video with a max of $3/mo. would mean you'd donate for the first 3 videos but no more. 

I believe this is the best way to utilize Patreon fairly for my work and future goals.

So if after reading in various magazines and websites my: articles, blog posts, op-ed pieces... if after seeing my past work on YouTube, and if after seeing my goals here you think my work might have some benefit for you and future generations of woodworkers then I hope you’ll take the plunge and become a wortheffort patron. It'll help alleviate some of the financial pain in creating a unique body of work.


Thanks,

Shawn Graham
Tiers
8 Bit Small Tip
$1 or more per YouTube Video 12 patrons
Smallest increment allowed by patreon is a dollar. Which if we reach 4 vids/mo. equals $4. Realistically I think we'll be doing 2-3 videos a month. But remember, Patreon lets you cap your monthly contribution at a specific dollar amounts.


Oh, and in appreciation of your patreonage you'll get early access to all new YouTube videos .


16 Bit Textbook Teaser
$2 or more per YouTube Video 7 patrons
Want early sneak peaks of the woodworking textbook we have in development? Well those contributing $2/vid towards the cause will get just that as I'll post a snippet here every time I finish a chapter. 


Plus everything in the 8 bit small reward.



24 Bit Extravaganza
$3 or more per YouTube Video 16 patrons
To show my appreciation for the $3 level of patreonage you guys and gals will get stuff designed and made by wortheffort. A couple times a year I'll do a mass mailer to all patreons at this level at that time and you just might get stickers, toys, art files, or whatnot.  Yes its random, yes it's spontaneous, yes you'll never know what your gonna get, but... that's the fun!


You'll also get early access to the videos and the textbook teasers.



Goals
$93 of $100 per YouTube Video
When we hit a patronage level on $100 per video all patrons will receive the charcoal artwork seen in that month's project videos.
1 of 1

Why you should become a 'wortheffort' Patron

A while back I wrote an article for Popular Woodworking “Hand Tools vs Power Tools for Beginners” ( http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/editors-blog/hand-tools-vs-power-tools-for-beginners) where I postulated that power tools should be eliminated, or at least drastically reduced, for beginning woodworkers. My argument was it is more efficient and effective in a classroom environment, students would get more out of it, teachers would have more opportunities for added learning, and it would offset some of what the modern technological world is losing. Additionally it was more cost effective for districts and in the end it would provide a better product for the work force upon graduation. And for the average home woodworker it’d give them a taste of the hobby without much risk either financially or physically. If they decided to venture deeper via power tool commitment they’d end up with a better understanding of wood, it’s interaction with the cutting edge, and end up with the complementary tools and skill to refine what those machines produce to their whim.  

The obstacle I outlined at the end of the article, and the reason why at that time I was leaning in the hand tool direction but hadn’t jumped whole heartedly yet, was finding the teachers. It had been a long time since the majority of woodworkers did stuff by hand hence most teachers in this area (in fact the certification for the subject in my home state of Texas) focused on production power tools. So making the change would be akin to having today’s technology teachers ditch computer labs in favor of mechanical typewriters.

Over the next year I slowly came to a forehead slapping realization. Woodworking, especially at the beginning level you’d be teaching to middle and high schoolers (or even new adult learners), ain’t that hard. It would be much easier to find expert teachers willing to learn a little woodworking than find expert woodworkers who want to learn to teach. Shoot… most good woodworkers don’t want to teach, they want to make stuff. That’s why they became woodworkers in the first place. Whereas expert teachers…

That was the kernel that led to a refocusing of my media creation starting in 2017. I’m going to write a textbook and create some modern media resources for teachers. Resources that can be also be used by homeschoolers, parents, group leaders, and such. Resources that will take a student thru a linear progression of lessons over a semester or two that teaches basic woodworking skills and relates it to their overall education to show the true value of learning.

In doing so we'll also create a body of work that better communicate with the general public wanting to self-educate and give the more experienced prompts to better communicate their own skills to the uninitiated.

But that is the end result of years of content creation that’ll require more time than I have if I continue working 70-80 markets a year selling stuff I make to subsidize wortheffort's media creation. So for 2017 I’m going to attempt to follow in others example and transition to online commerce with one branch being Patreon (the others being online sales and writing).

The plan is to utilize Patreon much differently than others in this DIY/Craft/Education segment who set up monthly subscriptions.

YouTube is how most people know me as a woodworker. My silent “artsy fartsy” build videos and long-form educational videos have been pretty popular and making them is fun thou time consuming. So for 2017 I plan on focusing only on those two types of videos for YouTube with the long-form educational ones now lining up with the chapters I've outlined for the future textbook. This also means keeping a steady schedule of publishing will be impossible because the long-form videos often times take several weeks longer to produce and videos are not the only income stream I have to work in order to subsidize the textbook creation.
 
While in theory an hour long video is as much content as a multitude of 10 minute videos, marketing wise it’s not the same impression to the public. So instead of a monthly subscription for a weekly video I’m choosing to set Patreon as a little tip jar for each video created. That way if I have to skip a few weeks here and there people won't feel cheated. Also it gives me the freedom to post some videos without putting out the "tip jar". These might be smaller videos that support the overall project but might not obviously fit in the woodworking realm. (I have a cool lecture I'll eventually get to on Diet Coke and Design via mathematics which would fit in this category.) 

And sometimes I might need to do a commercial for something I'm making to sell (have to pay the rent somehow) and that wouldn't be fair to charge patrons for. In 2018 I've also started a "WW'nTip-of-Day" series which are short-form lessons so they will not be "patronized" (i.e. - you aren't charged for them.)

A really cool thing about this type of setup is a person can also set a cap to their monthly donation. So a $3/video donation set to a max of $3/mo. would mean you'd donate for the first video only whereas a $1/video with a max of $3/mo. would mean you'd donate for the first 3 videos but no more. 

I believe this is the best way to utilize Patreon fairly for my work and future goals.

So if after reading in various magazines and websites my: articles, blog posts, op-ed pieces... if after seeing my past work on YouTube, and if after seeing my goals here you think my work might have some benefit for you and future generations of woodworkers then I hope you’ll take the plunge and become a wortheffort patron. It'll help alleviate some of the financial pain in creating a unique body of work.


Thanks,

Shawn Graham

Recent posts by wortheffort woodworking

Tiers
8 Bit Small Tip
$1 or more per YouTube Video 12 patrons
Smallest increment allowed by patreon is a dollar. Which if we reach 4 vids/mo. equals $4. Realistically I think we'll be doing 2-3 videos a month. But remember, Patreon lets you cap your monthly contribution at a specific dollar amounts.


Oh, and in appreciation of your patreonage you'll get early access to all new YouTube videos .


16 Bit Textbook Teaser
$2 or more per YouTube Video 7 patrons
Want early sneak peaks of the woodworking textbook we have in development? Well those contributing $2/vid towards the cause will get just that as I'll post a snippet here every time I finish a chapter. 


Plus everything in the 8 bit small reward.



24 Bit Extravaganza
$3 or more per YouTube Video 16 patrons
To show my appreciation for the $3 level of patreonage you guys and gals will get stuff designed and made by wortheffort. A couple times a year I'll do a mass mailer to all patreons at this level at that time and you just might get stickers, toys, art files, or whatnot.  Yes its random, yes it's spontaneous, yes you'll never know what your gonna get, but... that's the fun!


You'll also get early access to the videos and the textbook teasers.