Yuko Kominami is creating dance/choreography
1

patron

$2
per creation
Dance in Ritual
By Yuko Kominami (representative of the project)

My urgent question is why do we dance, why do I dance, what is it for? What can be the benefit of all this?
Dance has been a way for me to connect to things and their movements. Things visible and invisible, past, present and future.
The question has always led me to dance related to rituals. In Japan, historically, dance has strong connections to rituals. It has been a means of communication with gods, the movement of the visible and invisible matters, affirming and emphasizing connections to these movements. And from what I know, there are many other cases in the world, where, dance is deeply rooted in rituals. In rituals dance has a concrete meaning, in this way, I find back again a meaning in my dance and dance in general.
I started Butoh (Japanese contemporary physical expression - my background in dance) because I was attracted by the way it makes appear connections to the ever-changing world and lets unfold an extreme way of existing and being present. And also how it embraces the dilemma of being torn between this modern world and traditional Japanese ways to relate to the world.
After certain years of dancing and teaching, more and more, I have learned to respect this world and its movements and all woven connections. It has already become some kind of ritual I would like to take part in and share with others.
I have begun a search for exploring this experience deeper, and on the way, I met Benjamin and Joana. I was really excited to meet these two beautiful artists who share a similar question as mine and exploring it with their honest ways. Benjamin with Arawo, where he keeps alive the connections and rituals that is concretely embedded in the life and in the community. Joana with her sincere and severe research for her own rituals in her contemporary dance field.
I am excited meet together and experience, share and gain insights into three different approaches to dance and ritual, (different but sharing a lot of spaces in common.) Those three approaches complement each other to draw a whole picture. Connecting tradition and present and excavating and reaffirming the meaning in dance.

BIOGRAPHY 
Yuko Kominami

Born in 1973, Japan. She studied butoh and dance in Tokyo. After finishing her BA in Japanese history at Waseda University, she did a Professional Diploma in Community Dance Studies and an Independent Study Programme at Laban Centre London from 1998 to 2000. She obtained her MA in Dance Cultures, Histories and Practices from the University of Surrey with distinction in 2006. She has been working as an independent dance and performance artist. She has collaborated with other dancers, choreographers, artists, musicians and theatre directors of various landscapes. She has performed her work in prominent festivals such as Festival June Events - Atelier de Paris Carolyn Carlson, Les Repérages Danse à Lille, Festivalul International de Teatru de la Sibiu, Bodyradical in Budapest, Odisha Biennale in India and so on. She has also worked and performed in countries around the world – including Luxembourg, France, Germany,Belgium, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Hungary, Romania, Latvia, Finland, Turkey, U.K. , Japan, China, India and Peru.
Her work consists of experiments with movements in-between (movements of becoming) where intensities of individuals intersect. And through these experiments she aims towards affirmations of multiple and fragmented movements of ‘a life’.
Her work includes “Ones Voices” collaboration with Steve Kaspar (2004)“Linnunrata” (2007), “reMEMBRANEce” collaboration with Catherine Richard (2009) “Project O” collaboration with Rajivan Ayyappan and Emanuela Iacopini (2010)“Mayu” (2011) “Winter Worm- Summer Grass” (2013) “Three Short Stories” collaboration with Sayoko Onishi (2015) “Dreaming Scarlet Medusa” (2017)

www.yukokominami.com

video links:
https://vimeo.com/103692772
https://vimeo.com/138799672

Dance in Ritual
By Yuko Kominami (representative of the project)

My urgent question is why do we dance, why do I dance, what is it for? What can be the benefit of all this?
Dance has been a way for me to connect to things and their movements. Things visible and invisible, past, present and future.
The question has always led me to dance related to rituals. In Japan, historically, dance has strong connections to rituals. It has been a means of communication with gods, the movement of the visible and invisible matters, affirming and emphasizing connections to these movements. And from what I know, there are many other cases in the world, where, dance is deeply rooted in rituals. In rituals dance has a concrete meaning, in this way, I find back again a meaning in my dance and dance in general.
I started Butoh (Japanese contemporary physical expression - my background in dance) because I was attracted by the way it makes appear connections to the ever-changing world and lets unfold an extreme way of existing and being present. And also how it embraces the dilemma of being torn between this modern world and traditional Japanese ways to relate to the world.
After certain years of dancing and teaching, more and more, I have learned to respect this world and its movements and all woven connections. It has already become some kind of ritual I would like to take part in and share with others.
I have begun a search for exploring this experience deeper, and on the way, I met Benjamin and Joana. I was really excited to meet these two beautiful artists who share a similar question as mine and exploring it with their honest ways. Benjamin with Arawo, where he keeps alive the connections and rituals that is concretely embedded in the life and in the community. Joana with her sincere and severe research for her own rituals in her contemporary dance field.
I am excited meet together and experience, share and gain insights into three different approaches to dance and ritual, (different but sharing a lot of spaces in common.) Those three approaches complement each other to draw a whole picture. Connecting tradition and present and excavating and reaffirming the meaning in dance.

BIOGRAPHY 
Yuko Kominami

Born in 1973, Japan. She studied butoh and dance in Tokyo. After finishing her BA in Japanese history at Waseda University, she did a Professional Diploma in Community Dance Studies and an Independent Study Programme at Laban Centre London from 1998 to 2000. She obtained her MA in Dance Cultures, Histories and Practices from the University of Surrey with distinction in 2006. She has been working as an independent dance and performance artist. She has collaborated with other dancers, choreographers, artists, musicians and theatre directors of various landscapes. She has performed her work in prominent festivals such as Festival June Events - Atelier de Paris Carolyn Carlson, Les Repérages Danse à Lille, Festivalul International de Teatru de la Sibiu, Bodyradical in Budapest, Odisha Biennale in India and so on. She has also worked and performed in countries around the world – including Luxembourg, France, Germany,Belgium, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Hungary, Romania, Latvia, Finland, Turkey, U.K. , Japan, China, India and Peru.
Her work consists of experiments with movements in-between (movements of becoming) where intensities of individuals intersect. And through these experiments she aims towards affirmations of multiple and fragmented movements of ‘a life’.
Her work includes “Ones Voices” collaboration with Steve Kaspar (2004)“Linnunrata” (2007), “reMEMBRANEce” collaboration with Catherine Richard (2009) “Project O” collaboration with Rajivan Ayyappan and Emanuela Iacopini (2010)“Mayu” (2011) “Winter Worm- Summer Grass” (2013) “Three Short Stories” collaboration with Sayoko Onishi (2015) “Dreaming Scarlet Medusa” (2017)

www.yukokominami.com

video links:
https://vimeo.com/103692772
https://vimeo.com/138799672

Recent posts by Yuko Kominami