Aedon Shevirah Cassiel is creating Zombie Meditations
6

patrons

A year and a half ago, I was just making long effort posts on Facebook. People kept telling me to stop writing my posts in a place where they were just going to disappear down the memory hole and get lost, because—they kept assuring me—what I had to say was worth more than that. 

At the time, I didn’t care because I wasn’t writing for anybody. I didn’t care about persuading anyone, much less building an audience. I was just sitting around, thinking. 

Finally, my friend Paweł put together the blog that became Zombie Meditations. He said something like: “Look, it’s already done. The blog is made. So copy and paste the last thing you wrote, and put it there. Or else.” This is what it took for me to finally give in and begin “blogging”.

Within a few months, Loyola economist Walter Block had used me as a formal citation in an econ journal on the topic of the war on drugs. Where no one else anywhere I could find on the entire Internet had done so, I dug through the Congressional records to find out exactly how the black members of Congress had voted in the bills that defined the beginnings of the War on Drugs (surprisingly, nearly all had voted ‘Yea’), and I thoroughly documented the fact that it was actually black victims of crime and degeneracy associated with drug use spreading through black communities, and NOT racist whites who merely used drugs as a pretext for throwing black people in jail, who fundamentally pushed for and created the war on drugs as we know it today. 

Almost exactly a year ago to the time of this writing (I’m writing in June 2017), a random coincidence led to an experiment and I ended up writing at Counter-Currents.

Suffice it to say that the experiment was a success. 

Since then, I’ve been releasing a slow stream of articles there that were mainly pulled from my extensive backlog of things I’ve already written in various places (buried in the depths of social media, etc). But even with a steady average of nearly an article a week which I kept up despite a whole hell of a lot of other things going on in my life, I never thought I would be able to make journalism my thing once I was done cleaning out my “basement” of pre–prepared material.

The last couple of months have changed that. 

At the end of May, I made my first movie in the real world acting the part of a real life journalist by flying to NYC to cover an event involving Gilad Atzmon and others and then interview Gilad at the end. The interview was extremely well–received among Gilad’s audience (which is mostly left–leaning, although it generally blends the far left and the far right side by side). I also came out of the event with the offer of a photoshoot that turned out incredible.  Then I spent the next two months traveling up and down the East Coast (aimlessly, beyond the ultimate destination of returning to Georgia), hitting whatever events or protests I could, meeting people who knew me from my writing, meeting activists and writers and people involved in the movement, getting trapped on malfunctioning subways and leading the way for people to dive over the gate where the trains are connected onto the platform since the doors wouldn’t open, chopping wood and cleaning showers to pay for my “rent”, meeting people and then passing out overnight next to them on 24 hour bus rides, hitchhiking to nearby gyms and convincing people to let me in for free as their guests…

And I loved every minute of it. 

And it started to sink in:

I really actually do want to do this. I want this to be my “thing.”
And I want to keep getting better and better at it. 


The first thing I did when I got back was list my audiophile PSB M4U 2 active noise canceling head phones for sale, because I don’t even want to own anything that isn’t as lightweight and compact as possible and durable enough to survive rough traveling. I replaced them with a pair of V–MODA Forza Metallos I found on sale and put the difference back away in savings.

I want to take this onebagging thing down to a science. 

I’m already a pretty hardcore minimalist by nature: I stocked my part of the kitchen with exactly one set of silverware and two bowls. My upstairs loft has my guitar and recorder, my desktop on an Ergo Driven industrial cardboard standing desk stand, and a Day Light Classic Plus Light Therapy Lamp from Carex. Downstairs, I sleep on a mattress on the floor. Now I want everything else I own to fit into a single backpack. 

I no longer feel timid about asking for help—and lots of it—because I know exactly what I’m doing now, and I’m completely confident now that I’m capable of it, so I know I can put it to responsible good use. I want to trade my current (weak) backpack out for a Goruck GR2, and possibly also a Loctote Flak Sack. I want to get a rugged mic and a decent rugged camera so I can make video and record audio and podcast when I’m on the road.

Crucially, I need about $115 a month to afford a supplement called Qualia. It’s the difference for me between staying in a steady stream of high productivity, and just falling apart. And I’ll eventually be writing about (or, with your help, releasing video of myself discussing) the scientific benefits of it in detail, as well. 

Sad story time: I already had to spend close to this to supplement lithium and taurine (I get horrific episodes of sleep paralysis every single night if I don’t take them) and B vitamins and magnesium (I get horrific panic attacks for no apparent reason otherwise). Qualia added a whole hell of a lot of value to my life for the marginal increase over what I already had to spend just to maintain basic quality of life, and it's a huge part of the reason I was able to be as productive and constantly adaptable as I was on this trip, despite the constant stress and changing circumstances. 

I want to have rough adventures. I want to take long buses instead of fast, easy planes as often as I can handle it. I wantto know what it’s like to go train–hopping. I want to learn to sleep in an ultralight camouflage bivy and shower with a portable shower and wash my clothes with a Scrubba instead of taking hotels. I want to live without Internet (and I’m working on making the presence I do have to have as minimal as possible already—whenever I need my Facebook account turned on, I keep News Feed Eradicator turned on and I change the settings to make my front page news feed look like this.) I’m a hardcore minimalist. All I need is the one–time expense of a really rugged, durable gear set–up for vagabonding to travel around to events and record better audio and video, etc., and the ability to afford Qualia on top of my other expenses. I need a fully rugged set of gear (backpack, mic, phone, etc.) to survive the rough conditions I plan to put them through. And that’s literally everything I need to be completely fulfilled with my life and ready to take on new challenges and dedicate myself to becoming something within this scene without any distractions in my way at all. And my ultimate goal is self–sufficiency. Within three years, I want to be the guy with enough cash to spare to pledge my own cash in patronage to people whose work I respect and admire. Help me fight my way there, and you’ll have my undying gratitude. 
Rewards
Pledge $1 or more per month
My eternal gratitutude.
Goals
49% complete
At this step, I can justify spending several hours researching and writing each week. 
2 of 4
A year and a half ago, I was just making long effort posts on Facebook. People kept telling me to stop writing my posts in a place where they were just going to disappear down the memory hole and get lost, because—they kept assuring me—what I had to say was worth more than that. 

At the time, I didn’t care because I wasn’t writing for anybody. I didn’t care about persuading anyone, much less building an audience. I was just sitting around, thinking. 

Finally, my friend Paweł put together the blog that became Zombie Meditations. He said something like: “Look, it’s already done. The blog is made. So copy and paste the last thing you wrote, and put it there. Or else.” This is what it took for me to finally give in and begin “blogging”.

Within a few months, Loyola economist Walter Block had used me as a formal citation in an econ journal on the topic of the war on drugs. Where no one else anywhere I could find on the entire Internet had done so, I dug through the Congressional records to find out exactly how the black members of Congress had voted in the bills that defined the beginnings of the War on Drugs (surprisingly, nearly all had voted ‘Yea’), and I thoroughly documented the fact that it was actually black victims of crime and degeneracy associated with drug use spreading through black communities, and NOT racist whites who merely used drugs as a pretext for throwing black people in jail, who fundamentally pushed for and created the war on drugs as we know it today. 

Almost exactly a year ago to the time of this writing (I’m writing in June 2017), a random coincidence led to an experiment and I ended up writing at Counter-Currents.

Suffice it to say that the experiment was a success. 

Since then, I’ve been releasing a slow stream of articles there that were mainly pulled from my extensive backlog of things I’ve already written in various places (buried in the depths of social media, etc). But even with a steady average of nearly an article a week which I kept up despite a whole hell of a lot of other things going on in my life, I never thought I would be able to make journalism my thing once I was done cleaning out my “basement” of pre–prepared material.

The last couple of months have changed that. 

At the end of May, I made my first movie in the real world acting the part of a real life journalist by flying to NYC to cover an event involving Gilad Atzmon and others and then interview Gilad at the end. The interview was extremely well–received among Gilad’s audience (which is mostly left–leaning, although it generally blends the far left and the far right side by side). I also came out of the event with the offer of a photoshoot that turned out incredible.  Then I spent the next two months traveling up and down the East Coast (aimlessly, beyond the ultimate destination of returning to Georgia), hitting whatever events or protests I could, meeting people who knew me from my writing, meeting activists and writers and people involved in the movement, getting trapped on malfunctioning subways and leading the way for people to dive over the gate where the trains are connected onto the platform since the doors wouldn’t open, chopping wood and cleaning showers to pay for my “rent”, meeting people and then passing out overnight next to them on 24 hour bus rides, hitchhiking to nearby gyms and convincing people to let me in for free as their guests…

And I loved every minute of it. 

And it started to sink in:

I really actually do want to do this. I want this to be my “thing.”
And I want to keep getting better and better at it. 


The first thing I did when I got back was list my audiophile PSB M4U 2 active noise canceling head phones for sale, because I don’t even want to own anything that isn’t as lightweight and compact as possible and durable enough to survive rough traveling. I replaced them with a pair of V–MODA Forza Metallos I found on sale and put the difference back away in savings.

I want to take this onebagging thing down to a science. 

I’m already a pretty hardcore minimalist by nature: I stocked my part of the kitchen with exactly one set of silverware and two bowls. My upstairs loft has my guitar and recorder, my desktop on an Ergo Driven industrial cardboard standing desk stand, and a Day Light Classic Plus Light Therapy Lamp from Carex. Downstairs, I sleep on a mattress on the floor. Now I want everything else I own to fit into a single backpack. 

I no longer feel timid about asking for help—and lots of it—because I know exactly what I’m doing now, and I’m completely confident now that I’m capable of it, so I know I can put it to responsible good use. I want to trade my current (weak) backpack out for a Goruck GR2, and possibly also a Loctote Flak Sack. I want to get a rugged mic and a decent rugged camera so I can make video and record audio and podcast when I’m on the road.

Crucially, I need about $115 a month to afford a supplement called Qualia. It’s the difference for me between staying in a steady stream of high productivity, and just falling apart. And I’ll eventually be writing about (or, with your help, releasing video of myself discussing) the scientific benefits of it in detail, as well. 

Sad story time: I already had to spend close to this to supplement lithium and taurine (I get horrific episodes of sleep paralysis every single night if I don’t take them) and B vitamins and magnesium (I get horrific panic attacks for no apparent reason otherwise). Qualia added a whole hell of a lot of value to my life for the marginal increase over what I already had to spend just to maintain basic quality of life, and it's a huge part of the reason I was able to be as productive and constantly adaptable as I was on this trip, despite the constant stress and changing circumstances. 

I want to have rough adventures. I want to take long buses instead of fast, easy planes as often as I can handle it. I wantto know what it’s like to go train–hopping. I want to learn to sleep in an ultralight camouflage bivy and shower with a portable shower and wash my clothes with a Scrubba instead of taking hotels. I want to live without Internet (and I’m working on making the presence I do have to have as minimal as possible already—whenever I need my Facebook account turned on, I keep News Feed Eradicator turned on and I change the settings to make my front page news feed look like this.) I’m a hardcore minimalist. All I need is the one–time expense of a really rugged, durable gear set–up for vagabonding to travel around to events and record better audio and video, etc., and the ability to afford Qualia on top of my other expenses. I need a fully rugged set of gear (backpack, mic, phone, etc.) to survive the rough conditions I plan to put them through. And that’s literally everything I need to be completely fulfilled with my life and ready to take on new challenges and dedicate myself to becoming something within this scene without any distractions in my way at all. And my ultimate goal is self–sufficiency. Within three years, I want to be the guy with enough cash to spare to pledge my own cash in patronage to people whose work I respect and admire. Help me fight my way there, and you’ll have my undying gratitude. 

Recent posts by Aedon Shevirah Cassiel

Rewards
Pledge $1 or more per month
My eternal gratitutude.